Me and My Truck

October 1976By Comments

Me and My Truck - 0001

If Paris was indeed a Moveable Feast, Texas is currently a pickup truck, referring of course to the ultimate pickup and not the passing croissant. Accepted in the beginning for its serviceability and practicality, the 1949 through 1953 General Minors half-ton pickup truck is now somewhere between a monument to mechanized society and a true work of art. Perhaps it’s both.

Today’s owners seem to have very little in common with one another with the exception of a monolithic reverence for the truck.

None of these trucks seems appreciably altered from the original design of ballooned fenders, cozy cockpit, and a nosy grin for a grill. Conspicuous in their absence are CB radio aerials, gun racks, and bumper stickers, and as if to punctuate their worthiness almost every truck is in some stage of restoration. A product of the assembly line has become an object of affection. Why? Well, as Louis Armstrong used to say about his music. “If you have to ask what jazz, is, you’ll never know .”
— Harry Porter

"I've had this truck all my life."
“I’ve had this truck all my life.”

 

"What do you want to take a picture of this truck for?"
“What do you want to take a picture of this truck for?”

 

"They offered me fifty dollars to haul it off."
“They offered me fifty dollars to haul it off.”

 

"The house matched the truck, so naturally we bought it."
“The house matched the truck, so naturally we bought it.”

 

"People are always pulling me over trying to buy it."
“People are always pulling me over trying to buy it.”

 

"I paid fifty dollars for this."
“I paid fifty dollars for this.”

 

"It took fifteen quarters of oil to drive it here from Maryland."
“It took fifteen quarters of oil to drive it here from Maryland.”

 

"This is all I've got. This is all I want."
“This is all I’ve got. This is all I want.”

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