Thanks a Million ’98

Woodward? Philllip$? McNair? You can $ay at lea$t one thing about la$t year’$ mo$t generou$ Texan$: Their gift$ were big, but their name$ weren’t.

February 1999By Comments

DESPITE A LATE-SUMMER STOCK MARKET PLUNGE that gave both donors and recipients fits, 1998 was a fine year for giving in Texas.

For one thing, two of our state’s most benevolent souls received richly deserved—and long overdue—recognition. Ruth S. Altshuler of Dallas was named the National Society of Fund Raising Executives’ Outstanding Philanthropist of the Year, and Harold Simmons of Dallas was added to The American Benefactor’s list of the most-generous Americans, joining twelve other Texans in what is a sort of Giving Hall of Fame.

For another, many new givers burst onto the scene. When we last reported on who gives and to whom (“Thanks a Million,” December 1997), the names at the top of our list were familiar: Robert H. and Nancy Dedman, Robert M. and Anne T. Bass, H. R. “Bum” Bright, H. Ross and Margot Perot. In 1998 they’re nowhere to be found (of course, even these megadoners can’t give away millions every year). Instead, the most-generous Texans were Robert R. Woodward, Daniel T. and Merlene Phillips, and Robert C. and Janice McNair. Who? Read on to find out.

Last time around, many of the gifts we chronicled went to Southern Methodist University, in Dallas, which was in the midst of a capital campaign. This time two other universities, Texas Tech, in Lubbock, and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, pop up as recipients over and over, though youth-oriented organizations like the Boys and Girls Clubs, children’s hospitals, and grade schools appear frequently as well.

A few reminders about our criteria for inclusion:
• We listed only gifts of at least $1 million made between January and December 1998. Our last list stopped at November 1, 1997, so contributions made in the last two months of 1997 fell, for our purposes, into a philanthropic black hole. Unfortunately, that means we don’t get to recognize several substantial acts of generosity, like the Hobby family’s $21.4 million gift to Rice University’s Fondren Library, which was announced in December 1997.
• We didn’t count corporate gifts, so we couldn’t salute Texas Instruments, which gave $5.1 million to Texas A&M University.
• We didn’t count gifts in which the amount wasn’t revealed or the amount was revealed but the giver’s identity wasn’t—not even generous anonymous gifts like the $6 million donated to Rice University so a new baseball stadium could be built.
• We only listed givers whose primary residence is in Texas.
• Finally, we listed only living givers. Dead ones, alas, didn’t make the cut—though we’re grateful just the same.

Robert R. Woodward

Kerrville, $26.5 million

$26.5 MILLION TO ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY, in Abilene, to support the work of its College of Biblical Studies. The money came from a trust Mr. Woodward created in honor of his mother, Grace L. Woodward, who died last year. The retired rancher’s eldest daughter is a graduate of ACU; he is also a longtime friend of John Stevens, its former president and chancellor emeritus.

Daniel T. and Merlene Phillips

Dallas, $25 million

A total of $25 million to the BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF AMERICA, which is based in Atlanta, Georgia, for education programs and general use. Mr. Phillips, the chairman and CEO of FirstPlus Financial Group, says his own experience as a child in the Boys Club inspired the gift, which he and his wife made after learning that the organization was the official charity of the Goodwill Games. “I’m a big believer that Boys and Girls Clubs can make a real difference in helping many thousands of kids overcome their negative circumstances at home and in enhancing the education they receive in school,” he says.

Robert C. and Janice McNair

Houston, $22 million

$20 MILLION TO THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA, IN COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA—the second-largest gift to the university in its history—to endow the McNair Scholars Program, a national scholarship program for outstanding students. Mr. McNair, the CEO of CoGen Technologies Energy Group, is a graduate of the university; Mrs. McNair is a South Carolina native. “Janice and I were recipients of scholarships,” he says, “and we appreciate the assistance that was provided to us when we both needed it.”

$2 MILLION to the SOUTH CAROLINA AQUARIUM, its largest gift to date, to sponsor the Great Hall, a sunlight-filled space with a tank of schooling fish.

Harold Nix, Walter Umphrey, John Eddie Williams

Daingerfield, Beaumont, Houston, $20 million

$20 MILLION to BAYLOR UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL, in Waco, to fund an endowment and the construction of a new building. These trial lawyers, all Baylor Law School alumni, were on the legal team hired by Attorney General Dan Morales to help Texas sue U.S. tobacco companies; they shared in the record $17.3 billion settlement.

Edward H. and Janet Harte

Corpus Christi, $17.8 million

$10.8 MILLION to a variety of charities and nonprofit groups in South Texas, including $3.5 million to TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY–CORPUS CHRISTI, $1 million to CORPUS CHRISTI METRO MINISTRIES, and $1 million to the CORPUS CHRISTI MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND HISTORY.

$7 MILLION to charities outside South Texas, including historically black STILLMAN COLLEGE, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama; the NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY, in New York City, the AMERICAN FARMLAND TRUST, in Washington, D.C., the MAINE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION, in Ellsworth, Maine, and the TRUST FOR PUBLIC LANDS, in San Francisco, California.

Not all of the Hartes’ gifts were made public at first, but word got out. “We are shy about publicizing donations,” says Mrs. Harte, who has served on the boards of Planned Parenthood and the Food Bank of Corpus Christi. “But at the same time, we feel very strongly that we should share our good fortune with our community.” Initially the couple planned to make bequests, but they changed their mind late last year. “It’s more fun to watch what your money will do while you’re still alive,” says Mr. Harte, a former publisher of the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and a member of the board of directors of Harte-Hanks Communications. “It’s not much fun at all after death, I would imagine.”

Gordon A. and Mary Cain

Houston, $15 million

$10 MILLION to the Department of Chemical Engineering at LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana—the third-largest private contribution ever pledged to the university. Mr. Cain, an LSU alumnus, is the former chairman of Sterling Chemicals and the co-founder of the Sterling Group, a merchant bank that sponsors and invests in leveraged buyouts in the petrochemical industry.

$5 MILLION to RICE UNIVERSITY, in Houston, to develop writing programs for and improve the communication skills of science and engineering students.

Jack and Camille Garey

Georgetown, $15 million

$15 MILLION to SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY, in Georgetown, the largest gift it has ever received, to create an endowment for scholarships. Mr. Garey, the owner of Garey Construction Company, in Austin, and Mrs. Garey, a retired physical therapist, are University of Texas alums, but they chose Southwestern because they live nearby and wanted to make an impact on the school.

Michael and Susan Dell, Tom and Deborah Green, Tom and Lynn Meredith, Kevin and Debbie Rollins, Mort and Angela Topfer

Austin, $13 million

$13 MILLION to the AUSTIN MUSEUM OF ART from five top executives of Dell Computer Corporation and their spouses. Mr. Dell is the company’s founder and CEO. (He and his wife also gave $1 million to the CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL OF AUSTIN to upgrade its imaging center.) Mr. Green and Mr. Meredith are its senior vice presidents. Mr. Rollins and Mr. Topfer are its vice chairmen. (Mr. Topfer and his wife also gave $1 million to the seton healthcare network in Austin for the construction of the Seton Topfer Community Health Center, which will provide medical care to low-income workers without health insurance.) “Clearly, we’ve all benefited greatly from Dell’s success,” says Mr. Green, “and that carries a responsibility for us to be involved in the community.”

Joe and Lee Jamail

Houston, $12 million

$10 MILLION to the TEXAS HEART INSTITUTE, in Houston, in tribute to Dr. Denton A. Cooley, who performed bypass surgery on Mr. Jamail last year. “It’s a great honor for me and Lee to be in a position to help somebody who helps people,” says Mr. Jamail, who is a trial attorney.

$2 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN for minority scholarships. The Jamails say they hope the gift will reverse a trend of lower minority enrollment at the university and its law school.

The Family of Kathleen C. and Floyd Cailloux

Kerrville, $10 million

$10 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS M.D. ANDERSON CANCER CENTER, in Houston, for cancer research. “Our family wanted to give a gift to something worthwhile in Texas,” says Kenneth Cailloux, the couple’s son. “Genetic research could help make great strides in treating cancer.” The late Floyd Cailloux was the chairman and majority stockholder of Keystone International, a valve manufacturer.

Raymond D. Nasher

Dallas, $7.5 million

$7.5 million to DUKE UNIVERSITY, in Durham, North Carolina, to help build the Nasher Museum of Art. “I went to Duke and was on the board,” says Mr. Nasher, a banker, a developer, and an art collector. “I always thought the one thing it lacked was a cultural center.”

John and Julie O’Quinn

Houston, $7.5 million

$6 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON to fund the expansion of Robertson Stadium. Mr. O’Quinn, an alumnus of the U of H Law Center and a member of the U of H System Board of Regents, is a trial lawyer who was part of the State of Texas’ tobacco litigation team.

$1.5 MILLION to Houston’s CHILDREN’S ASSESSMENT CENTER, a facility where sexually abused children are treated and counseled.

Donald J. and Linda J. Carter

Dallas, $7 million

A total of $7 MILLION to the TEXAS SCOTTISH RITE HOSPITAL FOR CHILDREN, in Dallas, to create the Christi Carter Urschel Family Resource Center, which is named for their daughter. Half of the gift came directly from the Carters; the other half came from the Donald J. and Linda J. Carter Fund of the Communities Foundation of Texas. Mr. Carter is the chairman emeritus of Home Interiors and Gifts, which was founded by his late mother, Mary C. Crowley.

John P. McGovern

Houston, $6.5 million

$6.5 MILLION to DUKE UNIVERSITY’s School of Medicine to help fund the McGovern-Davison Children’s Health Center. Dr. McGovern, a Duke alumnus, made the gift in tribute to his mentor, the late Dr. Wilburt Cornell Davison, who was the first dean of Duke’s School of Medicine. “When I was in medical school and throughout my medical career, Dr. Davison was my hero, benefactor, and best friend,” says Dr. McGovern, the founder of the McGovern Allergy Clinic, the largest private allergy clinic in the U.S. “He remains so.”

Harold Riley

Austin, $6 million

$6 MILLION to SOUTHWESTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, in Fort Worth, the largest gift in its history. Mr. Riley’s father, the Reverend Ray Riley, studied at the seminary in the forties. Mr. Riley is the chairman, founder, and CEO of Citizens Insurance.

Jack S. and Laura Lee Blanton

Houston, $5 million

$5 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN’S JACK S. BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART. “The University of Texas desperately needs and deserves a museum that will support its mission of excellence in research and teaching,” says Mr. Blanton, who is the president of Eddy Refining Company and a past chair of the University of Texas System Board of Regents.

Paul B. Loyd

Houston, $5 million

$5 MILLION to SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY, in Dallas, for the construction of an all-sports center. The building will be named for Loyd, an SMU alumnus and the chairman of R&B Falcon Corporation, which specializes in oil and gas offshore drilling.

Ellison Miles

Dallas, $3.5 million

$3.5 MILLION to the DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT FOUNDATION for the construction of the Ellison Miles Geotechnology Institute at Brookhaven College, in Farmers Branch. Mr. Miles, an oilman, is the foundation’s director emeritus.

Jeff Condit, Jim Condit, John and Tina Condit

San Antonio, $3 million

$3 million to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY, in Lubbock, to fund programs at its colleges of business administration and home economics. Messrs. Condit, who are brothers, co-own Domicile, a property management company; they and Mrs. Condit all graduated from the university.

John L. and Anne W. Marion

Fort Worth, $3 million

$3 MILLION—the value of Georgia O’Keeffe’s home at Ghost Ranch and twelve surrounding acres—to the GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The Marions (he, the former chairman of Sotheby’s; she, a Tandy heiress) bought the home and land and donated them to the museum, which they founded in November 1995.

John J. and Rebecca Moores

Houston, $3 million

$2 MILLION to SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY, in San Diego, California, to fund the construction of its new tennis facility. Mr. Moores, who founded BMC Software in 1980, is the majority owner of the San Diego Padres.

$1 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN DIEGO to help fund its proposed college-prep charter school.

Margaret McDermott

Dallas, $3 million

$3 MILLION to the HOCKADAY SCHOOL, in Dallas—the largest gift in the private school’s 85-year history—to establish the Eugene McDermott Headmistress Chair. Mrs. McDermott’s late husband was a co-founder of Texas Instruments. Their daughter attended Hockaday; their granddaughter is enrolled there now.

Harold Simmons

Dallas, $2.19 million

$1.2 MILLION to SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY to endow four full-tuition scholarships in the President’s Scholars program. Mr. Simmons, a banker, has served on the executive boards of SMU’s Edwin L. Cox School of Business and Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. $990,000 to the PARKLAND HEALTH AND HOSPITAL SYSTEM, in Dallas, to fund the creation of a violence intervention and prevention center.

Perry R. and Nancy Lee Bass

Fort Worth, $2 million

$2 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN’s JACK S. BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART. Mr. Bass, a UT alumnus, is the president and director of Perry R. Bass, Inc., an investment company.

Nancy Hamon

Dallas, $2 million

$1 MILLION to renovate the fifth floor of the downtown DALLAS PUBLIC LIBRARY and to create the Nancy and Jake L. Hamon Oil and Gas Resource Center. “My husband was a friend of the library from way, way back when he first came to Dallas,” says Mrs. Hamon. “And he worked with them a lot and he read prodigiously, and that was one of his favorite charities.”

$1 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER AT DALLAS to expand the Southwestern Center for Breast Care. She originally pledged $500,000. When she received a thank-you letter with her name misspelled as “Hammon,” she sent a note to the executive director of the center pledging another gift. “If one ‘M’ is worth $500,000,” she wrote, “two ‘M’s should be worth $1 million.”

William W. and Margot Winspear

Dallas, $2 million

$2 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS, in Denton, the largest gift in its 108-year history. $1.4 million will go to the university’s new performing arts center to help fund the construction of the four-hundred-seat Lyric Theater. The remainder will be used to endow music scholarships. Mr. Winspear is the CEO of Associated Materials, a home-improvement company.

John Ferris

Dallas, $1.5 million

$1.5 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY for scholarships at its College of Business Administration. Mr. Ferris, a Texas Tech alumnus, is a senior vice president of Everen Securities.

Roy M. Huffington

Houston, $1.5 million

$1.5 MILLION to SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY’s Edwin L. Cox School of Business to endow a chair in finance in honor of Mr. Huffington’s wife, Phyllis Gough Huffington. Mr. Huffington, an SMU alum, is the chairman and president of Roy M. Huffington, Inc., an international petroleum operations company.

William P. Clements, Jr.

Dallas, $1.25 million

$1.25 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER AT DALLAS to help recruit outstanding young scientists in response to a $25 million challenge by an anonymous donor in 1997. A two-time governor of Texas, Mr. Clements is the founder of Southwestern Drilling Company.

Thomas O. Hicks

Dallas, $1.25 million

$1.25 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER AT DALLAS to help recruit outstanding young scientists in response to a $25 million challenge by an anonymous donor in 1997. Mr. Hicks, a co-founder, the chairman, and the CEO of the investment firm Hicks, Muse, Tate, and Furst, is a member of the UT System Board of Regents.

Jeffrey A. and Nancy Cain Marcus

Dallas, $1.25 million

$1.25 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER AT DALLAS to help recruit outstanding young scientists in response to a $25 million challenge by an anonymous donor in 1997. The gift is in recognition of the care one of Mrs. Marcus’ friends received at UT-Southwestern. Mr. Marcus, the founder and chairman of Marcus Cable, the ninth-largest cable TV company in the United States, is a member of the Southwestern Medical Foundation’s board of directors.

W. A. “Tex” and Deborah Moncrief

Fort Worth, $1.25 million

$1.25 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER AT DALLAS to help recruit outstanding young scientists in response to a $25 million challenge by an anonymous donor in 1997. Mr. Moncrief, an oilman, is a past donor to UT-Southwestern.

Michael L. Rosenberg

Dallas, $1.25 million

$1.25 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER AT DALLAS to help recruit outstanding young scientists in response to a $25 million challenge by an anonymous donor in 1997. Mr. Rosenberg, who formerly owned a wholesale wine and liquor business in New York, is a member of the board of UT-Southwestern’s private referral hospital, Zale Lipshy University Hospital.

Alex and Patti Munson

Lubbock, $1.1 million

$1.1 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY. $500,000 will fund undergraduate scholarships for women’s basketball, $400,000 will create an endowment to pay the salary of the women’s basketball coach, $100,000 will be used for the athletic academic-services building, and $100,000 will pay for programming at KOHM, the campus classical music station. Dr. Munson is a child psychiatrist and the vice president of the Canyon Lakes Residential Treatment Center, a private adolescent psychiatric hospital.

William E. Armentrout

Dallas, $1 million

$1 MILLION to SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY to establish an endowed scholarship fund at its Edwin L. Cox School of Business. Mr. Armentrout worked for most of his career as a supervisor at SEDCO, the world’s largest drilling contracting firm.

Robert and Laura Kyle Baker

Lubbock, $1 million

$1 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY’s Museum of Texas Tech to pay for the creation of scientific publications. Mr. Baker is the museum’s director of natural sciences and its curator of mammals and vital tissues. Dr. Baker, a Texas Tech alumna, is an associate professor of patient care in the Department of Community Medicine at the university’s Health Sciences Center.

Ed and Nelda Benninger

San Antonio, $1 million

$1 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY to fund programs at its colleges of business administration and arts and sciences. Mr. Benninger, a Texas Tech alum, is the former president and chief financial officer of Valero Energy Corporation.

Jane O. Burns

Lubbock, $1 million

$1 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY to create the Jane O. Burns Endowment, which will fund scholarships and a professorship in accounting at its College of Business Administration. Mrs. Burns is a professor emeritus of accounting at Texas Tech.

William P.Hobby

Houston, $1 million

$1 MILLION to SOUTHWEST TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY, in San Marcos, to endow a public service academy and a professorship in public service that will bear his name. “I’m familiar with what the various schools offer in this area,” says Mr. Hobby, a former lieutenant governor of Texas, “and I think Southwest Texas State University is an excellent program. I’m glad to have the opportunity to support it.”

Edmund and Adelyn Hoffman

Dallas, $1 million

$1 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER AT DALLAS to endow a professorship. Mr. Hoffman, the former co-chairman of the Southwest Coca-Cola Bottling Group, is a trustee of the Southwestern Medical Foundation. One of the Hoffmans’ sons, Dr. Richard Hoffman, graduated from UT-Southwestern’s medical school.

J. L. and Sydney Huffines

Dallas, $1 million

$1 MILLION to the UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER AT DALLAS to support cancer research. Mr. Huffines, who owns five automobile dealerships, is a trustee of the Southwestern Medical Foundation. “This contribution might help the quality of life of some people in the future,” he says.

James R. “Buzz” Hurt and Betsy Triplett-Hurt

Odessa, $1 million

$1 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY to fund programs at its School of Medicine. Mr. Hurt is a rancher. Mrs. Triplett-Hurt is a former journalist and a national chair of the university’s capital campaign.

Ronald and Carole Krist

Houston, $1 million

$1 MILLION to the SHRINERS BURNS INSTITUTE, in Galveston, to establish the Krist-Mlakar Endowment for Burned Children. Mr. Krist, a Houston attorney, represented a three-year-old boy who was badly burned when his family’s pickup was involved in a crash. The boy’s doctor was Joseph Mlakar, of the Shriners Burns Institute. “We were so moved by his God-like love for the children that we wanted to do what we could,” Mr. Krist says.

John Muse

Dallas, $1 million

$1 MILLION to BIRDWELL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, in Tyler—one of the largest donations ever made to a public school in the U.S.—for capital improvements. “I went to school there, and there are still great kids and great teachers there,” says Mr. Muse, a co-founder and the chief operating officer of Hicks, Muse, Tate, and Furst, “but the building is woefully inadequate, and the temporary buildings made the playground inadequate.”

Gary Petersen

Houston, $1 million

$1 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY’s College of Business Administration. Mr. Petersen, a Texas Tech alumnus and a member of its Chancellor’s Council, is a managing director and co-founder of EnCap Investments.

Phil and Victoria Price

Lubbock, $1 million

$1 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY to be split between its School of Mass Communications and its Vietnam Center. The Prices are Texas Tech alums and members of its Chancellor’s Council. Mr. Price is the president of Price Communications Group, an advertising agency.

E. M. “Manny” and Rosalyn Rosenthal

Fort Worth, $1 million

$1 MILLION to the BASS PERFORMANCE HALL, in Fort Worth, to fund construction of the sky-blue Rosenthal Great Dome. Mr. Rosenthal was the CEO of Standard Meat Company, which his father founded in 1937. In 1983 the company merged with Consolidated Foods, which later became Sara Lee.

Deion Sanders

Dallas, $1 million

$1 MILLION to his church, the POTTER’S HOUSE, in Dallas, to build a youth center. Mr. Sanders plays for the Dallas Cowboys.

Tom III and Dottie Swift

Dallas, $1 million

$1 MILLION to the SHELTON SCHOOL AND EVALUATION CENTER, in Dallas, where their sons are enrolled. The Swifts own Swift Property, a real estate investment firm.

Robert Dan “Heavy Cat” and Ann Thompson

Lubbock, $1 million

$1 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY to fund graduate fellowships in the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources. Mr. Thompson, an alum, is an agent at Massachusetts Mutual Insurance.

Eugene and Susan Vaughan

Houston, $1 million

$1 MILLION to VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, in Nashville, Tennessee, to pay for the expansion and renovation of the Sarratt Student Center. Mr. Vaughan, a Vanderbilt alumnus, is a founding principal of the investment counsel firm Vaughan, Nelson, Scarborough, and McCullough.

John and Lisa Walker

Houston, $1 million

$1 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY to endow a chair at its College of Business Administration. Mr. Walker, an alum, is the president of EnerVest Management.

Dennis and Cindy Wall

Lubbock, $1 million

$1 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY to endow a chair at its College of Education. Mr. Wall is the regional manager for Aetna Life Brokerage, an insurance and financial services agency. The Walls’ daughters are graduates of Texas Tech, as is Mr. Wall.

Harry and Kayla Weitlauf

Lubbock, $1 million

$1 MILLION to TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY to endow scholarships and a chair in the Department of Cell Biology and Biochemistry. The Weitlaufs (he, chair of the department; she, an alum of the university) are doctors.

Ann Castle compiles the Slate 60, a quarterly list of the nation’s sixty largest individual gifts, for the online magazine Slate.

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