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R.G.’s Roundup: Trump’s Words, U.T.’s Troubles, and Dyslexia Services

Our favorite political reads of the week.

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The Trump populist lexicon

By Marc Fisher

The Washington Post

In a nation where the Beltway journalists have become obsessed with every seemingly random tweet by President Trump, there is an underlying truth: Trump and his advisers have chosen their words carefully to appeal, not to the heads, but to the guts of those Americans who feel like the present and the future are leaving them behind. This Washington Post story is an excellent study of their words:

The official said that the rhetoric of the Trump administration is designed “to be neither left nor right but a common-sense approach that shines light on a very out-of-touch small group of people in a few big cities who have been the big winners and who try to portray the mainstream of America as being abnormal.”

“A lot of the language you’re seeing is about one question: Are we reindustrializing America or deindustrializing America?” the official said. “Sometimes the language falls into a left bucket and sometimes a right bucket, but the consistent theme is that the proper role of the American nation-state is to create more prosperity for American citizens.”

Buckets? Hmm. Where have we heard about buckets in the past? Actually, Democratic Hillary Clinton nominee used the term basket, but if you read a fuller version of her quote, there were two baskets. “You know, to just be grossly generalistic, you could put half of Trump’s supporters into what I call the basket of deplorables. Right? The racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic—you name it. And unfortunately there are people like that. And he has lifted them up, “ Clinton said. “But that other basket of people are people who feel that the government has let them down, the economy has let them down, nobody cares about them, nobody worries about what happens to their lives and their futures, and they’re just desperate for change. It doesn’t really even matter where it comes from. They don’t buy everything he says, but he seems to hold out some hope that their lives will be different.”

What Fisher writes is that Trump, through his words, is offering both baskets—to borrow a phrase from The Maltese Falcon—the stuff that dreams are made of.

As president, Trump has continued to make statements that are factually incorrect or are based on opinions he heard on TV. It is a pattern he followed throughout his business career. “I play to people’s fantasies,” he wrote in his first book, “The Art of the Deal.” “People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. I call it truthful hyperbole. It’s an innocent form of exaggeration—and a very effective form of promotion.”

These selections give you just a hint of what’s in this excellent article. Though it won’t change anyone’s mind about Trump and his policies, it may make a difference in what you hear.

McRaven did not have Abbott’s support

Ralph K.M. Haurwitz

Austin American-Statesman

University of Texas Chancellor Bill McRaven may have coordinated the Seal team that took out Osama bin Laden, but his plans to expand U.T. to Houston went FUBAR. In no small part, that was because he lacked the backing of Governor Greg Abbott.

What the chancellor didn’t mention was that the shared vision also needed to be with Gov. Greg Abbott. It would be difficult, for reasons both political and practical, to succeed in such an ambitious endeavor without the support of the governor. But Abbott never expressed support publicly for the project — or opposition to it, for that matter. His silence was telling.

However, the leaderless leadership posture has become a hallmark of Abbott’s administration. Whether it is the U.T. expansion or the so-called bathroom bill in the Texas Senate, Abbott seems to prefer staying silent to see if issues work themselves out without him having to take a position.

Depinho’s tenure at MD Anderson marked by high ambition and turmoil

By Todd Ackerman

Houston Chronicle

Meanwhile, back at the ranch, here’s more University of Texas news: the president of the university’s MD Anderson Cancer Center has resigned amid ongoing financial turmoil at the research hospital.

Dr. Ron DePinho resigned as president of MD Anderson Cancer Center Wednesday, ending a tumultuous tenure that began with high ambition and a “Moon Shots” promise to cure the disease, but which soon became mired in faculty unrest, questions of conflict of interest and financial difficulties…

But MD Anderson insiders said McRaven was less impressed behind the scenes. In a meeting with faculty two years ago at which he vowed to fix the “broken” relationship between the hospital’s leadership and faculty, he categorized DePinho as neither a born leader nor “someone who will never get there” but someone he hoped to be able to work with. The meeting was scheduled in the aftermath of a faculty senate resolution that stopped just short of a no-confidence vote, citing “a climate of fear” and “pervasive dissatisfaction” at the institution.

More than just DePinho’s departure, now that Vice President Joe Biden is out of the White House, what happens to those “Moon Shots” to cure cancer?

Trio of dyslexia-related bills seek funding, help for kids

By Julie Fancher

The Dallas Morning News

This is one of those issues that hit home for me, because I am mildly dyslexic. Fortunately, I never had any trouble reading, but as a child my spelling and handwriting were terrible. There was no help available in the Dallas public schools. In second grade, a teacher threw one of my papers back at me with a disdainful, “Your handwriting is chicken scratch!” In third grade, a teacher asked me if I was stupid.

Fortunately, my parents got me help through the Scottish Rite Hospital. For five long years, I went to a small class of dyslexic kids for ninety minutes every day after school and four hours on Saturday morning. They were long hours of drawing circles and push-pulls and memorizing spelling tricks and suffering through the reading-out-loud period when those classmates who couldn’t read struggled with each and every word. As Jack Welch, the dyslexic chairman of General Electric once said, dyslexia isn’t so bad if you survive childhood.

For me, the blessing of dyslexia is that it taught me to be extra careful in my work—no name, no fact, no word is too small to avoid double-checking. So over the years, my mistakes have been few—though there was one whopper in Spanish.

Not all children have parents who can afford to pay for the extra training for their children, and in the Legislature, there has been a struggle to bring that extra effort into most classrooms:

However, dyslexia experts said that because federal guidelines to qualify for special education are so strict, many students with mild to moderate dyslexia were not being served.

“At that time, special education utilized a discrepancy model for the identification of children with learning disabilities,” said Gladys Kolenovsky, the administrative director of the Luke Waites Center for Dyslexia and Learning Disabilities at Scottish Rite Hospital, who helped write the state’s dyslexia law back in 1985. “What it meant was that particularly bright children, children whose parents worked with them every night, or children who had tutoring support did not fall far enough behind to be identified for special education — and federal dollars — until the third or fourth grade.

So in 1985, the Texas Legislature passed the nation’s first dyslexia law offering services through general education, which allowed more students to be served, Kolenovsky said.

I’m not going to be out there advocating for this funding, but it was interesting to me that the House included dyslexia training in its proposal for school finance overhaul. That funding would be directed at 154,000 Texas children. Who knows, maybe one of them, if helped, will be the next Richard Branson, Whoopi Goldberg, Kiera Knightly, Steven Spielberg, Tim Tebow or novelist John Irving.

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  • José

    OK, RG, what was that Spanish spelling error that was so memorable?

    • SpiritofPearl

      That article was written by Julie Fancher of the DMN.

    • R.G. Ratcliffe

      Check out the Bum Steer for the year 2000. The mistake actually occurred in January 1999, so it had to wait a full year before becoming a Bum Steer: http://www.texasmonthly.com/articles/the-best-bum-steers-ever/

      • José

        Garcias! (sic)

  • WUSRPH

    If you read the story in today’s A-AS you can see that the gap between the people Trump was talking to and the people holding down more of the jobs of the future is growing larger every day. They are more and more not even living in the same parts of the country. My fear is that Trump’s “talk” will turn out to be little more than that with no real improvement in the lives of those who think they are being left behind. Of course, I’ve been concerned about the development of a “Blade Runner” society for a number of years.

  • WUSRPH

    Nine trips to the golf course in seven weeks in office. No wonder he’s not getting much done.

    • SpiritofPearl

      “I’ll never play golf!”

    • WestTexan70

      I’m all for him playing golf all the time. Keep him away from any policy making at all.

  • SpiritofPearl

    “Leaderless leadership” describes Abbott perfectly.

  • WUSRPH

    I assume you have heard that State Rep. Jessica Farrar of Houston slipped a bit of satire in the form of a bill…..with the intention of making a point…into the bill hopper at the Texas House of Representatives. The bill, as described by the Houston Chronicle:

    “State Rep. Jessica Farrar, D-Houston, filed a bill Friday that would penalize men for “unregulated masturbatory emissions.”

    The satirical House Bill 4260 would encourage men to remain “fully abstinent” and only allow the “occasional masturbatory emissions inside health care and medical facilities,” which are described in the legislation as the best way to ensure men’s health.

    A man would face a $100 penalty for each emission made outside of a vagina or medical facility. Such an emission would be considered “an act against an unborn child, and failing to preserve the sanctity of life,” according to the legislation.” (Houston Chronicle)
    While some might find the bill a little weird, Farrar is clearly trying to make a point with an “if we have to, so do you” measure that, in many ways, reflects the traditional teaching of the Catholic Church on sex. (At least that of the 1950s Baltimore Catechism.)
    It reminds me of a bill filed by former Houston State Sen. Craig Washington back in the 1980s when the Dan Patrick’s of that day were trying to pass legislation that would have required the consent of the male before a woman could obtain an abortion.
    Washington’s bill would have established that a man could not obtain a vasectomy without the written permission of his female partner but it had one major exemption–it did not apply to males who had attended Texas A&M since, as Washington explained it, any woman who had married an Aggie was clearly not competent to give informed consent.

    • WUSRPH

      I wonder how the LBB will write a fiscal note on the bill.

    • John Bernard Books

      You’re obsessed with sex

    • SpiritofPearl

      Of course, an invasive ultra sound procedure is required first.

      • WUSRPH

        Nope….see requires the probing of another body entrance.

        • SpiritofPearl

          Any orifice will make my case . . .

    • José

      Dang, they better have an exemption for teenagers!

  • donuthin2

    Apparently Tx A&M just hired a very elite electrical engineer that cost $9M. Not for his salary but for research tools and associates. Half came from the Gov’s fund for University recruitment and half from the University. Gov’s funding mechanism is up for consideration. Question: Is it worth it or not. I think so. In fact, I think it is much more prudent than giving incentives to industries to locate in Texas. Not sure this is the best mechanism, but recruiting top notch researchers is very competitive, especially when Texas Universities are not the typical place a star researcher would be looking to come. He apparently will work on making the electrical grid more efficient which if successful, would pay big dividends on the investment.

    • WUSRPH

      It makes perfect sense to put more into this kind of research—and even more to invest into the basic research that underlies all practical developments—but, according to Rick Perry, who had much to do with the incentive programs, that IS NOT THE PURPOSE OF THE PROGRAMS. When asked why more was not put into basic research efforts, Perry, said the program did not invest in that kind of research because it did not produce wealth. Apparently producing knowledge was not sufficient….it had to generate immediate returns.

      • BCinBCS

        The bias against basic research and general knowledge brings me to a conversation that I had with one of my most conservative friends. He recapped the desire of scientists to send small (he said “postcard” sized) space vehicles into the solar system powered by the energy of photons from laser beams on earth hitting their “sails” accelerating them outward. I told him that I had heard of the concept and it was being studied as an inexpensive form of space propulsion. It has even been proposed as a means of accelerating the spacecraft that eventually takes humans to mars.

        My friend was incredulous that the U.S. needing to spend the money to build the lasers installations that would propel these tiny spacecraft into the unknown and asked why it should be done. Since he was talking about tiny vehicles that would have no way to report back on their journey, I assumed that they would be launched as interstellar greeting cards. Even though I would be in favor of this mission, I had no practical answer as to why we should spend the money to do this.

        Can anyone justify such an endeavour?

        • WUSRPH

          It is a lot less expensive to build small prototypes to test the concept than to charge ahead to develop the full system. If we want to explore the universe we have to explore various concepts of how to get there. That’s my best explanation. Of course, that raises the basic question of whether we should be spending the money in the first place. It is sort of like the question JJ raises about the US “while we are not taking care of its own first”. But I am sure someone said the same thing the first time some human went “exploring” over the horizon.

        • José

          I read an article about those things. They actually would be equipped with microscopic cameras and sensors to record data and transmitters to send it back. Sounds unbelievable but then again just look at how technology has evolved in the last quarter century. Bottom line, if you think that deep space research has value, and I do, then these microsats are worth considering.

  • WUSRPH

    A question for you:

    What makes a public school “public”?

    Is it because they are open to the “public”?

    Because they receive “public funds”?

    Because their operations are subject to the approval of an elected board which in turn is answerable to the voters?

    Or because state law defines them that way?

    I ask that because of the fact that, even while Dan Patrick is trying to divert public tax dollars to private schools, the existing “charter schools” are making a drive for both state funding for facilities and for more funds per student.

    As you know, these schools operate outside the existing public school systems but receive state tax dollars for their operations. They are sold as being alternatives to the regular public schools who can operate without all the rules and regulations that some claim stifle innovation in the public schools. The evidence on whether they produce a better educated student is mixed. They are governed by self-appointed boards and are not responsible to the voters or even to the parents of the children who attend them.

    To me they are “not public” as I understand it….since they lack that vital element of being “answerable to the voters”…..but you may disagree. What do you think?

    • José

      This question gets better the more I mull it over. And it seems as though the answer is “all of the above, sort of”. As I understand them, charter schools are open to the public, they do receive public funding, and they are still subject to public oversight, just in a very indirect manner and and less rigidly. And that last part is the real booger. A lot of folks want to make it appear that the schools are being held to high standards when in fact they skate by with little to no accountability.

      Is there any major public school system in the US that has realized great success with charter schools over a period of years? The track record speaks for itself. The winners are the investors who scamper off with fat wallets while everyone else is a loser—the taxpayers, the students who get left behind when their charter school fails, and the students at the traditional public schools who get yanked around when their funding and student base get raided.

      If the state wants to experiment with innovative methods in public schools they don’t need to turn to for-profit enterprises or sketchy fly-by-night operations. Public school districts already have the authorization to set up magnet schools and specialized academies, and some perform quite well. Why not put more emphasis on expanding that concept as a vehicle for innovation?

    • SpiritofPearl

      Charter schools are selective, unlike public schools which must take all students within their geographical designation.

      Charters can kick out unruly students. Public schools can do so only in extraordinary circumstances.

      Charter schools take money from the existing public school budget. They don’t receive additional funds.

      And charters don’t perform better than conventional public schools . . .

  • WUSRPH

    This story on the use of budget reconciliation in the Senate to bypass the 60 vote rule may be of interest. Cruz is calling for the Senate to, in effect, ignore the existing precedents to ram thru a bunch of stuff…..The GOP likes to claim that the ACA was passed this way but, as usual, that is only partially correct.

    http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/lawmaker-news/323668-ted-cruz-wants-to-destroy-the-senate-as-we-know-it

  • BCinBCS

    WUSRPH:
    (i) in the previous BB post you commented asking the significance of April 6th. The only thing that I can think of is the beginning of U.S. involvement in WWI. Is that it?
    (i) Did you get that e-mail? If so, please answer the question.

    • WUSRPH

      you are right about it being the date on which the US entered WW I. I got your e-mail. Read the attached….I am still digesting it…..I would like to see some numbers of what your tax would have raised.

      • BCinBCS

        I didn’t get into the amount of funding because I assumed that something that is so important is worth funding adequately no matter the percentage of sales tax needed.

  • WUSRPH

    CBO says the Ryan/Trump plan will mean 24 million more without health insurance over the next decade….but it saves money. Funny that Trump used CBO figures in his attacks during the campaign…but now his aides say you cannot trust its numbers. Funny how you see things differently when it is you who are affected.

    The analysis puts the GOP in a difficult position: How do you attack the coverage number while being happy with the cost savings? But, if anyone can get away with being a Janus, Paul Ryan and Trump certainly can.

    I wonder how much of that deficit reduction will wind up being paid by local taxpayers as the uninsured are treated at county/city public hospitals?

    Of course, the fact that it costs less may make it easier for some of the Freedom Caucus types to vote for it…..They have no problem with more people being without insurance….and they love to cut the deficit.

    • SpiritofPearl

      Freedom to die of a preventable disease . . .

      • WUSRPH

        You keep forgetting that God does not do that sort of thing to worthwhile people. The others are supposed to suffer because of their or their grandfather’s sins.

        • SpiritofPearl

          Oh, but God does that to good people all the time!

          • WUSRPH

            By definition they then cannot have been good people.

          • John Johnson

            You are so wrong. Stop the goofy comments.

          • WestTexan70

            The only goofy comments are those purporting to believe in an all-powerful Sky-Buddy.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Whose definition? Calvinists?

        • John Johnson

          Your grasp of history comprehension when it comes to the Bible seems to be lacking. The entire premise of the NT is the fact that if you believe in Jesus as “your Lord and Savior”…that he is the Son of God, that he died for the sins of believers and was resurrected, you will be afforded “ever lasting life” in Heaven…a place more peaceful and beautiful than anyplace on earth.

          You will not find this in the OT. The OT, other than portelling of the coming of Jesus, and his lineage, is moot to the Christian religion…or should be.

          The OT belongs to the Jews. Many seem to have a difficult time understanding this…including many of today’s Christian churches.

  • WUSRPH

    One of the reasons why Trump and his ilk may be attacking the CBO numbers may be because, according to a WH document obtained by Politico, their own analysis shows even more will become uninsured than the CBO’s estimate.

    • José

      I wonder if anyone has gone back and looked at CBO estimates for the ACA and compared them to the wild forecasts by Republicans. I’ll bet a dollar that the CBO was a lot closer. If Republicans were so wrong then why should we believe them now?

      • WUSRPH

        One WH mouth apparently did since he was trying to make it look like the CBO had dramatically overestimated the number who would have some sort of coverage by now. He cited a projected 20 million drop in the number of uncovered, which has not happened, as proof that the CBO’s figures are not to be trusted. Of course, he did not reveal that the 20 million figure included those who would have been covered by the expansion of Medicaid to all 50 states which was called for by the original bill. That did not happen as only 31 states expanded the care. Texas, of course, did not. The original bill, in effect, made that expansion virtually mandatory…..but the SCOTUS ruling said the states had a choice.

  • WUSRPH

    I guess the battle over whether to fix the ACA or dump it for the Ryan/Trump “cut coverage, give the rich tax cut” plan boils down to how one sees the role of government in providing such things as health care in a “safety net” for is citizens. If you believe that society should do so it could be for many reasons ranging from that you believe that human dignity requires a basic level of care to the Bismarckian view that government should provide some basic services to people to keep them comfortable and less likely to cause social unrest…..but, whatever the reason, you would oppose Ryan/Trump. If you believe that government has no obligation to do anything but provide the most basic protections and that individuals are “on their own” for anything else you would support Ryan/Trump. As for me,. I guess I take after old Otto von…

    • BCinBCS

      As I wrote in the paper that I sent you, I wrestled with whether health care is a right or a privilege for almost twenty years until it dawned on me that the answer was in the Constitution. I realized that without adequate medical care the rights granted in the United States Constitution to “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” would be impossible because one cannot exercise those three founding principles without good health.

      Besides the implicit right to health care in the Constitution, there are also moral, practical and financial reasons why everyone should have adequate health care.

      • John Johnson
        • BCinBCS

          JJ, you are absolutely right. It isn’t in the Constitution. It’s in he Declaration of Independence. I am red-faced.

          The first sentence of the second paragraph of the United States Declaration of Independence states:
          We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

          The outcome of my dilemma about health care being a right or a privilege is the same – it is a right – but the supporting document has changed from the Constitution to the Declaration of Independence.

          • José

            You’ll still find ample support in the Preamble to the US Constitution;
            “…in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity…”
            That’s a magnificently broad charter.

        • WUSRPH

          I see you are changing your stand from “get a good plan” to challenging the idea of having one….but I guess that was inevitable when you are faced with bad numbers and another Trump promise that will not be fulfilled. As to where it says that in the Constitution, I suggest you start at the general welfare clause and then read McCulloch v. Maryland . That won’t do for a pure “literalist” like Ted Cruz (and now you) but its been good enough for most Americans and the courts since 1819.

          • WUSRPH

            P.S. Where does it say in the Constitution that the federal government can engage in “internal improvements” (roads, bridges, canals, air ports), regulate air and water pollution of even have an air force. Let’s take literalism all the way.

          • WUSRPH

            BYW, before you go off on one of “your being goofy” binges, you might check the Constitution.. You will find that there is nothing in Article I, Section 8 of the US Constitution that sets forth the powers of Congress that gives it any duty or right to engage in “internal improvements” or to regulate air and water pollution……In fact, there was a battle over internal improvements for most of the first 50 years of the Republic. Even Madison, “the father of the Constitution”, had doubts about internal improvements and as president vetoed a bill providing for them. But, the federal government sure does it…….. just like it does a lot of other things of which Cruz, Abbott and Paxton disapprove.

  • WUSRPH

    I presume that the CBO has estimates for the impact on the various states. It would be interesting to see Texas’. We already are number one in the nation in both the percentage of our population and the number of people who have no health insurance—-both if you include ALL residents, including illegals AND if you leave them out. We have been reducing the numbers thanks to the ACA, but doing away with most of the subsidy that helps people buy insurance at the same time cutting Medicaid is sure to send us zooming up again. But, as Rick Perry said, “we like it that way.”

  • John Bernard Books

    More bad news for dems…
    “Section 1. Purpose. This order is intended to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and accountability of the executive branch by directing the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (Director) to propose a plan to reorganize governmental functions and eliminate unnecessary agencies (as defined in section 551(1) of title 5, United States Code), components of agencies, and agency programs.”
    https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/03/13/presidential-executive-order-comprehensive-plan-reorganizing-executive

    Just got worse….it is snowing in DC and PRESIDENT Trump said, :its a no snow day”……

  • SpiritofPearl
    • WUSRPH

      Details of the deal sound like a “bailout” of someone who may have gotten a little overextended. I guess it is nice to relations in high places.

      • SpiritofPearl

        Overextension seems to be a family trait.

  • donuthin2

    What happened to the evidence that the White House was supposed to send to DOJ on the Obama wiretapping accusations? Thought the deadline for delivering was Monday?

    • WUSRPH

      Trump says he needs more time. And, as you’ve probably seen, his minions are now saying he really didn’t mean wiretapping but “wiretapping” in quotation marks.

      • donuthin2

        Yeah, he did not intend to be taken literally. I don’t quite understand how some during the campaign who spoke of Clinton’s misrepresentations have so much tolerance for Trump’s outright lies.

    • BCinBCS

      What happened to the evidence…?

      It’s time for Inspector Gadget!

    • SpiritofPearl

      They’re checking out all the microwaves in the WH residence.

  • John Bernard Books

    Trump sends HHHHHHUUUUUUUGGGGGEEEEE message to dems in DC…..
    “No snowday get your azzes to work.”

    “President Trump signed an executive order Monday aimed at cutting waste in the federal government.
    Trump signed the measure in the Oval Office, telling reporters it requires a “thorough examination of every executive department and agency” to find out “where money is being wasted [and] how services can be improved.”
    http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/323772-trump-signs-executive-order-to-cut-government-waste

    No more 47%ers posting on blogs all day while drawing tax payer funded chedks……

    • WestTexan70

      You are a truly disturbed person.

      • John Bernard Books

        You’re point is that anyone who opposes a bloated federal government is disturbed? how disturbing…….

        • WestTexan70

          No — I’ve seen your work in the past — you’ve got some serious problems. Your hatred of your fellow man shows that you need lots of psychiatric assistance. Please go get it before your fellow goopers make it too expensive to get.

          • John Bernard Books

            don’t be hater….you’ll enjoy life more.

          • dave in texas

            Boy, that’s ironic coming from you.

          • John Bernard Books

            not at all, I use humor to expose the looters. I’ve never seen such a meltdown as the one on display by the Trump haters.
            I chuckle when I remember dems picked Trump to run against Hillary. How stupid…….hahaha
            Dave how does it feel knowing the bored state gig is ending…..

          • dave in texas

            As always, you completely missed the point.

          • WestTexan70

            Very funny coming from the man who wants to hurt everyone who isn’t a wild-eyed “conservative”.

      • SpiritofPearl

        Booksie is the president the Low I.Q. Club.

  • WUSRPH

    Here is The Economist’s analysis of the impact of the Ryan/Trump plan. As a non-American outfit they are less likely to be accused of “bias”….

    http://tinyurl.com/htzytkt

  • WUSRPH

    The Texas Senate is spending this afternoon following Dan Patrick into women’s bathrooms.

  • WUSRPH
  • BCinBCS

    I tend to be fairly level emotionally. I don’t get overly sad and I don’t get overly happy. Funny things will make me smile and very funny things usually get a single chuckle out of me. But, Stephen Colbert of CBS’ The Late Show has me howling out loud with laughter. Among other topics, he nightly points out the absurdity of the current political situation. If you haven’t seen his opening monologue, watch at least the first 30 minutes of his show for some exceptionally funny comedy.

  • WUSRPH

    Today’s history quiz:

    What is Oct. 31 the 500th anniversary of? An event that changed the world.

    • BCinBCS

      The first nail of the Lutheran church was hammered.

  • John Bernard Books

    MSNBC’s Rachel Madcow illegally obtains PRESIDENT Trump’s 2005 tax return and publishes it proving he paid a higher tax rate than The Clintons, Obama and Bernie…..
    “What should be scary to everyone is operatives in the government might have leaked information we pay them to protect and it was leaked to attack a political opponent.
    These lawbreakers are the same people who complain about Trump ordering law enforcement to follow the law.”
    http://www.independentsentinel.com/maddow-publishes-trumps-illegally-obtained-2005-tax-return-proving-pays-taxes/

    The dem meltdown is hilarious……

  • John Bernard Books

    Great news….
    “The budget, which will be released on Thursday, is expected to drastically decrease the size of government, cutting jobs in sectors such as housing, foreign aid, and environmental protection — and instead prioritizing areas such as the military and homeland security.”
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/03/13/trump-budget-could-cut-federal-bureaucrats-by-highest-levels-since-end-of-world-war-two/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social

    Trump to downsize federal bureaucracy…..

  • John Bernard Books

    Sorry I’m falling down on the job This should been posted days ago….
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/362585d5e21db6ad3d5f2ecc7c9da539c88b8cd3fff25b0625b75612245d46ac.jpg