Evan Smith

Evan Smith is the CEO and editor in chief of the Texas Tribune. Previously he spent nearly 18 years at Texas Monthly, stepping down in August 2009 as the magazine’s president and editor in chief. He previously served as editor for more than eight years—only the third person to hold that title. On his watch, Texas Monthly was nominated for 16 National Magazine Awards, the magazine industry’s equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize, and twice was awarded the National Magazine Award for General Excellence. For eight years, he hosted the Lone Star Emmy Award-winning weekly interview program Texas Monthly Talks, which aired on PBS stations statewide. He currently hosts Overheard With Evan Smith, airing on PBS stations nationally. A New York native, he has a bachelor’s degree in public policy from Hamilton College and a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University.

Stories

Cliff and Lisa Sharples

The husband-and-wife co-founders of garden.com dish the dirt on their IPO.

W is for "Whew"!

The former stripper, the tabloid, and George W. Bush.

Pretty, Good

Hooray for Hollywood’s All the Pretty Horses.

Entrepreneur of the Century—Michael Dell

“Entrepreneurship is the art of the possible. Anyone with money and a good idea has what it takes to write his own ticket. The hitch, of course, is follow-through. You have to execute. You have to do it. And no one has done it as well as Michael Dell.”

Weed All About It

The knock on Matthew McConaughey’s arrest.

Gov Story

Ping-Pong balls in our governor’s past.

In Vogue

The tycoon from Texas who’s very much in Vogue.

Evitable?

How George W. could be evitable.

Bad News

Does the Dallas Morning News discriminate? Plus: Bill Clinton between the covers.

Buy George?

The book (make that books) on George W. Bush.

George, Washington

His days as a “loyalty thermometer” in the nation’s capital.

Has Gramm Had His Phil?

Is Phil Gramm out of gas (and oil)?

Legs

ZZ Top v. Chrysler

Heady Lamar

Several Sundays a year, Texans wake to find not one but two GOP presidential hopefuls inside the state’s borders.

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