Evan Smith

Evan Smith is the CEO and editor in chief of the Texas Tribune. Previously he spent nearly 18 years at Texas Monthly, stepping down in August 2009 as the magazine’s president and editor in chief. He previously served as editor for more than eight years—only the third person to hold that title. On his watch, Texas Monthly was nominated for 16 National Magazine Awards, the magazine industry’s equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize, and twice was awarded the National Magazine Award for General Excellence. For eight years, he hosted the Lone Star Emmy Award-winning weekly interview program Texas Monthly Talks, which aired on PBS stations statewide. He currently hosts Overheard With Evan Smith, airing on PBS stations nationally. A New York native, he has a bachelor’s degree in public policy from Hamilton College and a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University.

Stories

Who's Next?

San Antonio's Marshevet Hooker is not just any old high school sprinter; she's an Olympic gold medalist in the making. Meet her and nine other women we're betting will lead the new Texas—and the world.

David Clyde

His post-phenom life.

FLFW Will See You Now

In a rare interview, George H.W. Bush—a.k.a. the Former Leader of the Free World—disses Newt and the Dixie Chicks, muses on the restorative powers of Maine, and (who'd have imagined?) has nice things to say about the current occupant of the Oval Office.

Clifford Antone

Clifford Antone gets back in the club.

A Few Words With Ron Kirk

Evan Smith talks with former Dallas mayor Ron Kirk about life after politics and, well, politics.

Molly Ivins

Molly Ivins goes nuts for Arnold.

Anchor Away

What Walter Cronkite really thinks about cable TV shoutfests, the length of network newscasts, and (ahem) Jayson Blair.

Barbara Bush

The former first lady on her new book, how she writes— and why she never liked Alice in Wonderland.

One Ticked-off Grandma

You'd be one too if you were Carole Keeton Strayhorn and you thought the governor was messing with you.

Joe Jamail

Joe Jamail rails against tort deform.

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