Gary Cartwright

Gary Cartwright received his B.A. in journalism from Texas Christian University. He has had a distinguished career as a newspaper reporter and as a freelance writer, contributing stories to such national publications as Harper’s, Life, and Esquire. He was a senior editor at Texas Monthly for 25 years until his retirement in 2010 at age 76. Cartwright was a finalist for a National Magazine Award in 1986 in the category of reporting excellence. He has been the recipient of a Dobie-Paisano fellowship and has won the Texas Institute of Letters Stanley Walker Award for Journalism and the Carr P. Collins Award for nonfiction. He won the 1989 Press Club of Dallas Katie Award for Best Magazine News Story. He also won the 2005 Headliner Club of Austin award for best magazine story. Cartwright has written several books, including Blood Will Tell, Confessions of a Washed-up Sportswriter, Dirty Dealing, and Galveston: A History of the Island, published in 1991. He has co-written three movie scripts, J. W. Coop (Columbia, 1972); A Pair of Aces (CBS-TV, 1990), which he also co-produced; and Pancho, Billy and Esmerelda, which he co-produced for his own production company in 1994. In addition, he co-produced Another Pair of Aces for CBS. Blood Will Tell was filmed by CBS-TV as a four-hour miniseries in 1994. In 1998 his book, HeartWiseGuy, was published.

Stories

Spur of the Moment

San Antonio put a full-court press on basketball superstar David Robinson in hopes that he wouldn’t forget the Alamo City.

Paradise Lost

Las Colinas was supposed to be Can-Do City. So why couldn’t it?

I, Piscivore

How I learned what to do with the one that didn’t get away.

The Sleaziest man in Texas

The rich and eccentric heir to a rich and Galveston family, Shearn Moody, Jr., craved an empire all his own. But his lack of self-restraint cost him his bank, his insurance company, his fortune, and now, perhaps, his freedom.

Clint Murchison, Jr.

He was one tycoon who enjoyed the hell out of his money.

The Longest Ride of His Life

When Randall Adams was sentenced to death ten years ago, the Dallas community thought a cop killing had been put to rest. But it hasn’t.

Home Ain’t Where My Heart Is

When I was growing up, Arlington didn’t have air conditioning or Six Flags. But it did have Albert’s Pool Hall and twenty-cent Jax beer, and that made all the difference.

Total Hit

One morning last August, a San Antonio patrolman told his superior officer that his best friend was a killer cop. By that afternoon, the killer cop was dead, the patrolman was claiming self-defense, and a city infamous for strange killings was in the midst of one of the strangest of all.

Touch Me, Feel Me, Heal Me!

I was curious when I found that three of my friends had delved into the mysteries of psychic surgery. After three “bloody operations” of my own, I knew what it was all about. About $30 a minute.

Behind the Lines

The solution politicians fear.

The Snootiest Neighborhood in Texas

The residents of San Antonio’s King William Historic District saved their neighborhood from bums, bulldozers, and bogus bay windows. Now, if they can only save it from themselves.

Swamp Gas

When Jimmy Lee, an unrepentant troublemaker, felt he had taken one insult too many from the powerful Fredeman family, he called in the law. The results of that action have exposed decades of larceny and corruption in Port Arthur and threaten a Gulf Coast empire.

Texas Monthly Reporter

A turf battle over shrimp on the coast; a nominee for the meanest man in Houston; a former Cowboy’s reflections on why athletes go broke.

The Final Gun

In a small East Texas town a black principal and a white coach loved the same woman. First came the gossip. Next came the strange letters. And then there was a murder.

An Aggie’s Revenge

Starting with his alma mater and using little more than charm, Robert Hicks conned the college fund-raising industry out of hundreds of thousands of dollars. His name is mud at A&M.

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