Gary Cartwright

Gary Cartwright received his B.A. in journalism from Texas Christian University. He has had a distinguished career as a newspaper reporter and as a freelance writer, contributing stories to such national publications as Harper’s, Life, and Esquire. He was a senior editor at Texas Monthly for 25 years until his retirement in 2010 at age 76. Cartwright was a finalist for a National Magazine Award in 1986 in the category of reporting excellence. He has been the recipient of a Dobie-Paisano fellowship and has won the Texas Institute of Letters Stanley Walker Award for Journalism and the Carr P. Collins Award for nonfiction. He won the 1989 Press Club of Dallas Katie Award for Best Magazine News Story. He also won the 2005 Headliner Club of Austin award for best magazine story. Cartwright has written several books, including Blood Will Tell, Confessions of a Washed-up Sportswriter, Dirty Dealing, and Galveston: A History of the Island, published in 1991. He has co-written three movie scripts, J. W. Coop (Columbia, 1972); A Pair of Aces (CBS-TV, 1990), which he also co-produced; and Pancho, Billy and Esmerelda, which he co-produced for his own production company in 1994. In addition, he co-produced Another Pair of Aces for CBS. Blood Will Tell was filmed by CBS-TV as a four-hour miniseries in 1994. In 1998 his book, HeartWiseGuy, was published.

Stories

Total Hit

One morning last August, a San Antonio patrolman told his superior officer that his best friend was a killer cop. By that afternoon, the killer cop was dead, the patrolman was claiming self-defense, and a city infamous for strange killings was in the midst of one of the strangest of all.

Home Ain’t Where My Heart Is

When I was growing up, Arlington didn’t have air conditioning or Six Flags. But it did have Albert’s Pool Hall and twenty-cent Jax beer, and that made all the difference.

The Longest Ride of His Life

When Randall Adams was sentenced to death ten years ago, the Dallas community thought a cop killing had been put to rest. But it hasn’t.

Clint Murchison, Jr.

He was one tycoon who enjoyed the hell out of his money.

The Sleaziest man in Texas

The rich and eccentric heir to a rich and Galveston family, Shearn Moody, Jr., craved an empire all his own. But his lack of self-restraint cost him his bank, his insurance company, his fortune, and now, perhaps, his freedom.

I, Piscivore

How I learned what to do with the one that didn’t get away.

Paradise Lost

Las Colinas was supposed to be Can-Do City. So why couldn’t it?

Every One a Victim

The parents of a confessed killer went to jail rather than testify against their son. Now the murder conviction has been reversed, and the family of the deceased must endure renewed anguish.

Spur of the Moment

San Antonio put a full-court press on basketball superstar David Robinson in hopes that he wouldn’t forget the Alamo City.

An Old Five-and-Dimer

My Mad Dog days behind me, I’ve found contentment with young jackanapes at my feet and the girl of my dreams beside me.

Search and Destroy

An employee’s vandalism by computer might have gone unpunished but for a rookie prosecutor out to test a new law.

Poisoned With Love

They were elderly people, flattered by the attention of a nice young man. But sometimes it’s a mistake to depend on the kindness of strangers.

The Work of The Devil

The disappearance of a University of Texas student in Matamoros led police to the discovery of a drug-dealing cult whose rituals were not only unholy but unthinkable.

How George Foreman Finally Beat Muhammad Ali

It took him a decade to throw the punch that knocked out his toughest opponent—his own obsession with getting another shot at Ali. Now he wants to take on Mike Tyson.

Old Salts and Ancient Mariners

In which a landlubber chronicles the saga of getting his sea legs aboard the good ship Elissa.

Pages