Gregory Curtis

Gregory Curtis was born in Corpus Christi and raised in Kansas City, Missouri. He received a BA in English from Rice University and a master’s in English from San Francisco State College. While in San Francisco, he ran a very small printing and publishing company. He became a staff writer for Texas Monthly in 1972, just as the magazine was launched, and was promoted to editor in 1981, a position he held until 2000. In addition to Texas Monthly, he has written for the New York Times, New York Times magazine, Rolling Stone, Fortune, and Time. Curtis is the author of The Cave Painters and Disarmed: The Story of Venus DeMilo. He lives in Austin and is an adequate equestrian and aspiring magician.

Stories

The New Facts of Life

Is doing what comes naturally good enough these days?

The Dream House of H. Allen Smith

When a noted American humorist retired to Alpine, the joke was on him.

The White Shoe

Sole food for Middle America.

Star Struck

Star light, star bright, will the computer work tonight?

Man Bites Dog

How the Dallas SPCA got itself indicted for cruelty to animals, and other shaggy dog stories.

The Truth about Tequila

From machismo to counterculture in one decade.

Being Single: A True-life Adventure

The loneliness of the long distance bachelor.

Retreat from Liberation

A different sort of women’s movement has this basic belief: give in and ye shall receive.

This Man Loves Car Wrecks More than Anyone Else in the World

For A.O. Pipkin, happiness is a head-on collision he wasn’t in.

Mike Newlin Has Something on His Mind

One of pro basketball’s smartest players thinks about everything but the game.

Pomp and Circumstance

The private life of a public high school.

From Fellini to Deep Throat

For a theater owner, money has redeeming social value.

Disaster, Part One: Lubbock

West Texans are going to have to figure out what they’re going to do when the well runs dry.

The Fastest Gun in the West

Being a straight shooter is its own reward.

The Strange Power of Fred Carrasco

He left a police department, a mayor, and fifty bodies in his wake.

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