Jake Silverstein

Jake Silverstein is the editor in chief of Texas Monthly. He attended Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, and also received degrees from Hollins University, in Roanoke, Virginia, and the Michener Center for Writers, at the University of Texas at Austin. In the late nineties, he worked as a reporter for the Big Bend Sentinel, a weekly newspaper in Marfa. In 2005 he became a contributing editor to Harper’s Magazine. His first book, Nothing Happened and Then It Did: A Chronicle in Fact and Fiction, was published in 2010 by W.W. Norton. His work has also appeared in the anthologies Best American Travel Writing 2003 and Submersion Journalism (2008). He joined the staff of Texas Monthly as a senior editor in 2006. In 2008 he was named the fourth editor of the magazine. During his editorship, the magazine has been nominated for eleven National Magazine Awards (the industry’s equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize) and won two, for General Excellence and Feature Writing. He lives in Austin.

Stories

Evolution of a Dish

Paul Qui's Rabbit Seven Ways.

The Food Issue

We are what we eat, and everything we eat has a story.

The Artist and the City

For thirty years, when she wasn’t writing books or winning genius grants, Sandra Cisneros has been pushing and prodding San Antonio to become a more sophisticated (and more Mexican) city. Now she’s leaving town. did she succeed?

The Truth About Texas: Water = Life

As last year’s historic drought reminded us, Texas has always lived life by the drop, just a few dry years away from a serious crisis. With our population expected to nearly double over the next fifty years, this situation is about to become more, not less, challenging. This month we look at the past, present, and future of water and drought in Texas and explore the solutions that give us hope.

Trials and Errors

Over the past two decades Texas has exonerated more than eighty wrongfully convicted prisoners. How does this happen? Can anything be done to stop it? We assembled a group of experts (a police chief, a state senator, a judge, a prosecutor, a district attorney, and an exoneree) to find out.

The Great Campaigner

After eleven contested elections dating back three decades, Rick Perry remains undefeated. Is he brilliant? Lucky? Ruthless? We asked the people who know best—his vanquished opponents.

Night of the Living Ed

With public education facing an estimated $7 billion in cuts, the question on everyone’s mind is, Are Texas schools doomed? So we assembled a group of dinner guests (a superintendent, advocates on both sides, an education union rep, and the commissioner of the Texas Education Agency) to find out. Check, please?

The Immigration Dinner Party

We invited four lawmakers who disagree vehemently on the subject and a couple of experts to keep things friendly. Pull up a chair for a round of table talk you won’t soon forget.

The Gentleman From Texas

Only a few years after arriving in Washington, John Cornyn has become the capital’s most powerful Texan. Can he lead the Republicans back to power in the Senate?

Boy’s Life

They may disagree on just about everything, but Rick Perry and Bill White have one thing in common: a Texas childhood.

Boy’s Life—Rick Perry

Before Rick Perry was fighting for the governorship of the second-largest state in the country, he was just a kid from Paint Creek.

Spurs of the Moment

These practical accessories of the cowboy lifestyle are some of the world’s most-sought-after Western collectibles—and every pair has a story.

Stories