Jan Reid

Jan Reid is a former senior editor at Texas Monthly and has contributed to Esquire, GQ, Slate, Men’s Journal, Men’s Health, and the New York Times. An early article about Texas music spawned his first book, The Improbable Rise of Redneck Rock. Among his ten books are a well-reviewed novel, Deerinwater, for which he won a Dobie-Paisano Fellowship; a collection of his magazine pieces, Close Calls,Rio Grande, a compilation of choice writing and photography on the storied border stream; and The Bullet Meant for Me, a reflection on marriage, friendship, boxing, and physical and emotional recovery from a deadly shooting in Mexico.

Stories

He’s About A Mover

Country, jazz, blues, R&B, polka, and conjunto—the late, great Doug Sahm was a walking encyclopedia of Texas music. An exclusive excerpt from a new biography explores how he stirred it all together and found his own sound in his first great song.

Cold Case

One year ago tejano star Emilio Navaira was nearly killed in a tour bus accident outside Houston. What are we still learning about the experimental medical procedure that may have saved his life?

Citizen Cane

Ten years ago I was shot in Mexico City by a street thug who wanted to kill me. Since then, I’ve endured unbelievable pain and learned how to walk again, and I’m thankful for what I have: a new outlook on life, time with my family, and a chance to step back into the ring.

Physician, Heal Thyself

When Sam Hassenbusch was diagnosed with a deadly form of brain cancer, the only saving grace was his own history of treating the very same affliction.

Ann

She was our governor, but she was my friend.

Seems Like Old Times

My Wichita Falls High School reunion inevitably got me thinking about the passage of time but also about memories that endure. And, of course, football.

Rocket Man

Richard Garriott wants to experience space travel because it would be cool—and because his dad did.

Me of Little Faith

All I know for certain about religion is that the one my mother tried so hard to pass on to me just didn’t take.

2. Ronnie Earle

The long arm of the law is getting longer every day—and reaching into the Capitol.

The Good Doctor

Can one of the state’s best writers change modern medicine as we know it? Abraham Verghese hopes so—one story at a time.

The Man With the Plan

You probably know that Tom DeLay spearheaded the massive—and massively controversial— congressional redistricting effort that tied Texas legislators in knots for one regular and three special sessions. What you probably don’t know is how he did it. Herein lies a tale.

The Metamorphosis

If you want to understand the shift in political power that has taken place in Texas over the past thirty years—from rural areas to the new suburbs, from Democratic control to Republican dominance—you’ll hardly find a better case study than Tom DeLay’s Sugar Land.

Rednecks, Armadillos, And Me

The Improbable Rise of Redneck Rock rises again.

The Warrior's Bride

Cynthia Ann Parker was nine when a Comanche snatched her from her East Texas home in 1836. Yet throughout her life as her captor’s wife she remained strong, brave, and devoted to her husband and children. Which is to say, she was the original Texas woman.

The End of the River

Why the mighty Rio Grande isn’t so mighty anymore: a twisted tale of international politics, water rights, and environmental reality (with a drought thrown in for good measure).

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