Jan Reid

Jan Reid is a former senior editor at Texas Monthly and has contributed to Esquire, GQ, Slate, Men’s Journal, Men’s Health, and the New York Times. An early article about Texas music spawned his first book, The Improbable Rise of Redneck Rock. Among his ten books are a well-reviewed novel, Deerinwater, for which he won a Dobie-Paisano Fellowship; a collection of his magazine pieces, Close Calls,Rio Grande, a compilation of choice writing and photography on the storied border stream; and The Bullet Meant for Me, a reflection on marriage, friendship, boxing, and physical and emotional recovery from a deadly shooting in Mexico.

Stories

Kid Gloves

Growing up in Wichita Falls, I was a skinny kid with buckteeth and a girl’s name, so I got into my share of fights. To improve my odd’s of winning-and turn my anger and fear into bravery and skill-I learned to box.

Tony Sanchez's New Deal

The 58-year-old banker and oilman from Laredo is enormously wealthy, has impeccable Texas roots, and–best of all–is Hispanic. Sounds like the Democrats’ dream candidate, right? Maybe.

Earl Campbell

He has moved from pig skin to pork sausage, but he’s still trying to score.

To Hell and Back

After he was shot by a Mexico City cab driver—and told that he might be paralyzed—Jan Reid was flown to Houston, where Dr. Red Duke and a team of therapists literally got him back on his feet. In an excerpt from his forthcoming memoir, The Bullet Meant for Me, Reid reconstructs the grueling nine weeks of recovery before he and his wife, Dorothy, finally headed home to Austin.

Return to The Gay Place

Forty years after it was published, Billy Lee Brammer’s novel about LBJ-era Austin is still one of the best ever written about American politics. Yet just as interesting is the story of Brammer himself.

A Heavy Weight

In this corner, convicted rapist Tony Ayala of San Antonio—once a rising star of pro boxing, now an ex-convict on the road to redemption. And in this corner, his past—the toughest opponent he’s ever faced.

Ladies and Gentlemen, the Next Cormac McCarthy

Meet El Paso novelist James Carlos Blake, who writes critically acclaimed literary westerns with lots of violence but few female characters. Sound familiar?

The Improbable Rise of Lyle Lovett

Twenty years ago, he was inspired by the redneck rock of Steve Fromholz and Guy Clark. On his new album, he says thanks.

Glory Days

Texas high school football may be in decline, but filmmakers still want to play.

The Contender

He may soon compete for the super featherweight championship of the world, but for now Austin boxer Jesus Chavez is in the fight of his life—with federal immigration officials.

Legends of the Fall

Texas football heroes Darrell Royal, Doak Walker, Sammy Baugh, and John David Crow are off the field, but they’re still having a ball.

Milligan’s Island

With his resounding voice and striking appearance, Austin’s Malford Milligan stands out in a sea of Texas soul singers.

Gruene Peace

A historic dance hall, the cypress-shaded Guadalupe, a couple of rustic inns: A great weekend getaway awaits you less than an hour from Austin and San Antonio.

The Cult of Keen

It took two decades of shows at honky-tonks filled with frat-boy fans and Aggie admirers, but singer-songwriter Robert Earl Keen has his first major-label record deal.

Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s Willie Nelson

Willie Nelson may not be a radio staple anymore, but a new tribute album recorded by some of rock’s coolest stars shows that his music is still moving to them.

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