Jan Reid

Jan Reid is a former senior editor at Texas Monthly and has contributed to Esquire, GQ, Slate, Men’s Journal, Men’s Health, and the New York Times. An early article about Texas music spawned his first book, The Improbable Rise of Redneck Rock. Among his ten books are a well-reviewed novel, Deerinwater, for which he won a Dobie-Paisano Fellowship; a collection of his magazine pieces, Close Calls,Rio Grande, a compilation of choice writing and photography on the storied border stream; and The Bullet Meant for Me, a reflection on marriage, friendship, boxing, and physical and emotional recovery from a deadly shooting in Mexico.

Stories

Running Rabid

Five years ago, rabies was rare in South Texas. Now nearly three hundred animals have died and the epidemic is not abating.

Running Rabid
Profile: Return of the Native Son

For years he renounced his Texas ties. Now Larry McMurty is once again calling Archer City home.

Scarred

Not long after she made her trek from Texas to New York, Marla Hanson saw her modeling career end at the hands of a razor-wielding thug. Six years later, the cuts on her face have healed, but the emotional wounds remain.

Showdown at Maverick Ranch

With bulldozers poised to plow through their family’s historic spread, three San Antonio sisters are waging war against the state department.

Armed and Considered Dangerous

The only thing scarier than facing a great pitcher is facing a hothead like Roger Clemens.

Mood Indigo

Head for the hills: Texas has a bumper crop of bluebonnets this year.

That Mojo Season

An outsider exposes the hidden risks in Odessa’s bigger-than-life brand of football.

Texas Primer: The Runaway Scrape

In early 1836, after the fall of the Alamo, a small episode in Texas history revealed an aspect of our character we’d just as soon forget.

Compadres De La Revolucion

Though the leaders of Mexico’s revolution all lived short and violent lives, a handful of those who rode with them have survived to a ripe old age in Texas.

The Meanest River

Yes, it’s muddy, it’s treacherous, and it smells bad enough to gag a skunk; but it’s also the only thing between us and Oklahoma.

Character Flaw

A tour of the Texas psyche, with guides like Sam Houston, Katherine Anne Porter, and John Henry Faulk; a novel of adolescence addresses carnal knowledge and fundamentalist religion.

The Soft Sell

Once, the term “paperback original” was reserved for second-rate work. Now, thanks to an innovative editor, two Texas novelists are proud to see their books in softcover.

Novel Approach

Three novelists discover that a Texas connection need not be a tie that binds.

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