Michael Ennis

Michael Ennis has been a regular contributor to Texas Monthly since 1977. He is the New York Times best-selling author of the historical novels The Malice of Fortune, Duchess of Milan, and Byzantium, which have been published worldwide. He earned his degree in history from the University of California, Berkeley; taught art history at the University of Texas, Austin; and is a former John D. Rockefeller III Foundation Fellow. His nonfiction writing, on subjects ranging from military preparedness and national politics to art and architecture, has won several national awards; been included in the curriculum of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point; and has been published in a number of books and anthologies as well as magazines such as Esquire, ARTnews, and Architectural Digest.

Stories

Cult of Self

Young Mexican artists look inward for magic, menace, and machismo.

Buried Treasures

Sifting through stored collections, the Dallas Museum of Art discovers a tradition of spiritual subtlety among Texas artists.

Double Visions

Melissa Miller’s latest paintings are a dark departure from her past; a Rauschenberg retrospective examines his youthful eye.

Then and Now

Two San Antonio shows examine how Texas artists interpret the state’s past and present.

Long Shot

Bert Long comes to Houston’s Contemporary Arts Museum by way of the Fifth Ward, the Marines, haute cuisine—and the Prix de Rome.

Southern Exposure

At Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts, Mexican photographers portray their culture with rare empathy and a sense of wonder.

Raw Visions

A Houston show introduces new black Texas artists in works that range from personal vision to political agitprop.

Focus: Local Color

With the suddenness of a revolution, Texas changed from a cultural colony to a hot spot for homegrown artists.

Moving Pictures

A provocative San Antonio exhibit captures the flash and fervor of the Chicano movement in art and politics.

All American

The Dallas Museum of Art spent $55 million on a splendid new wing—and redefined itself in the process.

When Worlds Collide

A Houston art exhibit juxtaposes spirit and science with family photos, Tylenol caplets, and gigantic blood cells.

We Are the World

An ambitious new exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston suggests Texas is becoming less like itself and more like everyplace else.

The Mod Squad

Long mocked for making unrecognizable pieces of junk, Texas Modernists strike back in a superb exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

In the Red

Texas artists versus Texas galleries.

On With the Shows

Now that both its building and its mission have been renovated, Houston’s Contemporary Arts Museum is ready to win back the public and reestablish its eminence.

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