Michael Ennis

Michael Ennis has been a regular contributor to Texas Monthly since 1977. He is the New York Times best-selling author of the historical novels The Malice of Fortune, Duchess of Milan, and Byzantium, which have been published worldwide. He earned his degree in history from the University of California, Berkeley; taught art history at the University of Texas, Austin; and is a former John D. Rockefeller III Foundation Fellow. His nonfiction writing, on subjects ranging from military preparedness and national politics to art and architecture, has won several national awards; been included in the curriculum of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point; and has been published in a number of books and anthologies as well as magazines such as Esquire, ARTnews, and Architectural Digest.

Stories

Flipping Out

When big-time gymnastics came to Fort Worth, half the contestants were steely-eyed little girls with the bodies of children and the wills of fanatics.

Flipping Out

When big-time gymnastics came to Fort Worth, half the contestants were steely-eyed little girls with the bodies of children and the wills of fanatics.

Doing the Greenville Avenue Boogie

By reputation Dallas is a staid city. But there is one strip where Dallas is fevered, excessive, and lascivious, and where every night is party night.

Doing the Greenville Avenue Boogie

By reputation Dallas is a staid city. But there is one strip where Dallas is fevered, excessive, and lascivious, and where every night is party night.

Zandra and the Laughing Elk

Al Neiman’s Fortnight the attractions varied between eccentric Americans and somnambulant British.

The Thin Man

Albert Giacometti’s sculptured figures, now at the Dallas Museum of Fine Art, are tall, emaciated, uncomprehending—and breathtaking.

The Little Red Warehouse

Institutional green walls and stuffy classrooms are not a part of Houston architect Eugene Aubry’s Awty School design.

The Little Red Warehouse

Institutional green walls and stuffy classrooms are not a part of Houston architect Eugene Aubry’s Awty School design.

East Meets Wet

The Dalai Lama encounters Houston. He finds it good.

East Meets Wet

The Dalai Lama encounters Houston. He finds it good.

The Man Who Built River Oaks

Architect John Staub, the forgotten genius of River Oaks, transformed a few nondescript Houston streets into Millionaire’s Row.

The Man Who Built River Oaks

Architect John Staub, the forgotten genius of River Oaks, transformed a few nondescript Houston streets into Millionaire’s Row.

Titles Texans

Beneath certain Stetsons lies a crown.

Titles Texans

Beneath certain Stetsons lies a crown.

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