Michael Ennis

Michael Ennis has been a regular contributor to Texas Monthly since 1977. He is the New York Times best-selling author of the historical novels The Malice of Fortune, Duchess of Milan, and Byzantium, which have been published worldwide. He earned his degree in history from the University of California, Berkeley; taught art history at the University of Texas, Austin; and is a former John D. Rockefeller III Foundation Fellow. His nonfiction writing, on subjects ranging from military preparedness and national politics to art and architecture, has won several national awards; been included in the curriculum of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point; and has been published in a number of books and anthologies as well as magazines such as Esquire, ARTnews, and Architectural Digest.

Stories

Change of Art

Just over forty years ago, Texas was the kind of place dismissed as hopelessly provincial and culturally mediocre. But then came the Kimbell Art Museum.

The 10 Best Buildings in Texas

A tour of our greatest architectural master-pieces—from the Alamo to the World Birding Center—shows how the collision of the Old World and the New forged a unique style on the Texas frontier.

He Was A Camera

Russell Lee’s rarely seen Texas photographs reveal an artist at the peak of his powers of observation.

Art • Joseph Havel

Breaking the mold.

Northern Exposure

With Fort Worth’s Michael Auping as a curator and nine of the state’s artists participating, this year’s Whitney Biennial puts a New York spotlight on the art of Texas.

ART • Luis Jimenez

Sculpting a legacy.

The Return of the Native

With a major retrospective of his work at three Houston museums, Robert Rauschenberg is once again the talk of Texas. What’s he been up to? A portrait of the artist as an old man.

Folks

The boom in “outsider” art that began in New York, Chicago, and Atlanta has finally come to Texas, driven by true visionaries whose images conjure worlds that may have never existed but are invariably inhabitedby penetrating psychological truths.

Shock Therapy

By employing stereotypes like Sambo and Aunt Jemima, Austin painter Michael Ray Charles hopes to master the art of racial healing.

Looking at Mexico

Visitors may suffer from culture shock upon seeing the artistic riches of “Mexico: Splendors of Thirty Centuries.”

Cult of Self

Young Mexican artists look inward for magic, menace, and machismo.

Parish the Thought!

FYI: The Houston Post’s new society sleuth has great connections, a phone in her purse, and the complete attention of Houston’s haut monde.

Learning to Love the Bomb

Can a Texas publisher of technical books make a difference in the nuclear powers’ arms race? You bet.

Wonder Plane

Up in the sky, it’s a plan, it’s a helicopter—no it’s a tiltrotor, the Texas hybrid that will soon revolutionize air travel.

Solace in the Desert

With dogged independence, amazing endurance, and a rugged romantic vision, photographer Laura Gilpin helped create the way we see the West today.

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