Paul Burka

The dean of the Capitol press corps, senior executive editor Paul Burka joined the staff of Texas Monthly one year after the magazine’s founding, in 1973. For nearly forty years he has led the magazine’s political coverage and spearheaded its storied roundup of the Best and Worst Legislators each biennium. A lifelong Texan, he was born in Galveston, graduated from Rice University with a B.A. in history, and received a J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law.

Burka is a member of the State Bar of Texas and spent five years as an attorney with the Texas Legislature, where he served as counsel to the Senate Natural Resources Committee.

Burka won a National Magazine Award for reporting excellence in 1985 and the American Bar Association’s Silver Gavel Award. He is a member of the Texas Institute of Letters and teaches at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also a frequent guest discussing politics on national news programs on MSNBC, Fox, NBC, and CNN.

Stories

Can't Hardly Wait

The Legislative Follies 2003.

Altered State

Why Texas politics will never be the same.

Map Quest

The battle lines over redistricting.

Rice and Shine

Rice guys finish first.

Sizzle and Stakes

Dallas mayor Laura Miller is hungry to take on the big problems facing the city.

Metro Editor

Senior executive editor Paul Burka talks about this month's special issue on Dallas.

Greatness Visible

The dream of a first-rate university rising out of the prairie north of the Colorado River is almost as old as Texas itself. Which prompts the question, When will UT finally live up to its potential?

Horns Aplenty

Senior executive editor Paul Burka talks about this month's cover story, "Greatness Visible."

Judging Priscilla

Priscilla Owen judged.

Ruthless People

Yes, I don't get it.

And Then There Were None

Call it Perrymandering. Call it Tomfoolery. But whatever you call redistricting, call it successful (for now). And call the white Democrats dead.

A Giant Void

Master of the Senate.

The Man Who Isn't There

In word and deed, the George W. Bush now residing in the White House bears little resemblance to the Texas governor I gladly sent to Washington. That's why I'm so ambivalent about reelecting him.

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