Skip Hollandsworth

Before joining the Texas Monthly staff, in 1989, executive editor Skip Hollandsworth worked as a reporter and columnist in Dallas and as a television producer and documentary filmmaker. During his tenure with the magazine, he has received several journalism awards, including a National Headliners Award, the national John Hancock Award for Excellence in Business and Financial Journalism, the City and Regional Magazine gold award for feature writing, and the Texas Institute of Letters O. Henry Award for magazine writing.

He has been a finalist four times for a National Magazine Award, the magazine industry’s equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize, and in 2010 he won the National Magazine Award in feature writing for “Still Life,” his story about a young man who, after suffering a crippling football injury in high school, spent the next 33 years in his bedroom, unable to move. The 2011 movie Bernie, which Hollandsworth co-wrote with Richard Linklater, is based on his January 1998 story, “Midnight in the Garden of East Texas.”

Stories

Fight Club

Without the cooperation of Texas law enforcement, the dogfighting subculture will continue to thrive.

Perversion of Justice

Cathy McBroom loved working as a case manager for Samuel Kent, Galveston’s brilliant, charismatic, all-powerful federal district judge. Then he started attacking her.

Judgment Day

What really happened to Kari Baker? We may be about to find out.

193

That’s the number of times Harris County housewife Susan Wright stabbed her husband in a brutal 2003 murder that riveted the nation and landed her in prison for 25 years. But should the butcher of the burbs be freed?

Witness for the Prosecution

The shocking testimony of Vanessa Bulls against Matt Baker.

The Bucket List

63 things that all Texans must do before they die.

Patient Observation

Wichita Falls was about as average a town as you could imagine. Except within the gates of the state hospital.

Leave It To Bea

One woman’s unlikely crusade to help poor kids succeed—and what Texas can learn from her example.

On the Road—In Tents

Dad wanted us to remember our family camping getaways. After so many disasters, how could I forget?

That’s Oil, Folks!

Forget the Outer Continental Shelf. There’s a good old-fashioned boom happening in Midland, thanks to a crafty drilling technique that unlocked the secret reserves of the Permian Basin and revived the late, great West Texas oilman.

In Our Backyard

The faces—and voices—of eighteen Texans who are living the debate over illegal immigration.

Angels and Devils

CBS’s 48 Hours fills in the final chapters of the notorious Matt Baker.

Rich Man, Poor Man

The tragic culture clash that led to the murder of a governor’s son.

The Lost Boys

It was the most shocking crime of its day, 27 boys from the same part of town kidnapped, tortured, and killed by an affable neighbor named Dean Corll. Forty years later, it remains one of the least understood—or talked about—chapters in Houston's history.

A Closer Look at One of Dean Corll’s Victims

Dorothy Hilligiest's son David disappeared one day in 1971. She spent her days and nights searching for him, following leads, and eagerly awaiting his return. And then she found out about Dean Corll, one of the most prolific serial killers in U.S. history.

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