Stephen Harrigan

Stephen Harrigan is the author of nine books, including the award-winning novels The Gates of the Alamo and Remember Ben Clayton. His most recent book is the forthcoming The Eye of the Mammoth, a career-spanning collection of his essays, many of which were written for Texas Monthly. He is also a screenwriter who has written many movies for television. 

Stories

Heaven & Earth

The break-up of the space shuttle Columbia was a chilling reminder that the astronauts who dare to dream and risk their lives for the benefit of all mankind are, at the end of the day, mere mortals.

My Own Private Alamo

After 164 years, what more is there to say about (or see at) the old mission church in downtown San Antonio? That depends on how you look at it.

The Gates of the Alamo

An exclusive excerpt from Stephen Harrigan's eagerly awaited novel.

His Perfect World

Growing up in Longview and Texas City, John Lee Hancock dreamed of a life in the movies. Today, he’s one of L.A.’s hottest screenwriters.

To Dive For

For breathtaking snorkeling in subterranean rivers and caverns, take the road out of Cancún and head for the Yucatán rain forest.

War Games

Finally, a toymaker that isn’t just kidding around: A new Alamo playset gets things right.

Deconstructing Willie

Carnality, Castration Anxiety, and Jouissance in Willie Nelson’s Taco Bell Commercial.

Holding the Fort

In 1731 the Spanish presidio of Los Adaes became the first capital of Texas. Today no one recognizes the name.

Some Things Never Change: A Cut Above

Eating a hunk of beef at Brenner’s is not as politically correct as it used to be. But that doesn’t stop me.

My Underwater Self

From the YMCA pool to the ocean blue, I’ve always been at peace in the deep.

Lights! Camera!

Action abounds in the new slide show at the San Jacinto Monument, but the view of history falls a bit short.

Highway 1

Retracing the trail that tamed the Texas wilderness--the Camino Real.

The Man Who Never Stops

Robert A. Caro has spent fifteen years writing his monumental biography of Lydon Johnson. He is halfway through.

Swamp Thing

Snapping turtles are cantankerous, grotesque, and savage. And those are just a few of the reasons I like them.

Wild Forever

Once the private preserve of an oil executive, the 300,000-acre Bid Bend Ranch, with all its desert grandeur, has now entered the public domain. Photography by Mark Klett

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