Stephen Harrigan

Stephen Harrigan is the author of nine books, including the award-winning novels The Gates of the Alamo and Remember Ben Clayton. His most recent book is the forthcoming The Eye of the Mammoth, a career-spanning collection of his essays, many of which were written for Texas Monthly. He is also a screenwriter who has written many movies for television. 

Stories

Texas Monthly Reporter

Looking for the essence of Texas in El Paso, the soul of Dr. Red Duke in Houston, the secrets of status in Dallas, and a quirky West Texas empire in Balmorhea.

Main Street

It’s Houston’s driveway, a twenty-mile kaleidoscope of bankers, punkers, strippers, surgeons, students, grackles and cars.

Mr. Hannah’s Rocket

His first spacecraft blew up on the pad and his primary investor died, but the first free enterprise rocket finally flew from Matagorda.

Mr. Hannah’s Rocket

His first spacecraft blew up on the pad and his primary investor died, but the first free enterprise rocket finally flew from Matagorda.

What Texas Means To Me

God created Texas, and then He created people who would love it.

Let’s Get Serious About Toys

They used to be virtuous and wooden and they were good. Now they’re commercial and plastic and they’re great.

Let’s Get Serious About Toys

They used to be virtuous and wooden and they were good. Now they’re commercial and plastic and they’re great.

Child’s Play

A brief but opinionated guide to the world’s best toys, from the Alpha Porbe to the telephone.

Child’s Play

A brief but opinionated guide to the world’s best toys, from the Alpha Porbe to the telephone.

The Perfect River

From giant freshwater prawns to bikini-clad coeds, from ancient Indian artifacts to swimming pigs, there’s something for everyone on the San Marcos River.

The Governor’s New Clothes

Bill Clements, unmasked at last.

The Governor’s New Clothes

Bill Clements, unmasked at last.

Grin and Bear It

Camping gets you back to the basics: blisters, chiggers,
and, yes, deep satisfaction.

Grin and Bear It

Camping gets you back to the basics: blisters, chiggers,
and, yes, deep satisfaction.

Paper Cowboys

Southwest Fiction might make you think that the region is
mostly metropolis and no mesquite. The Guadalupe
Mountains of Texas hits a lot of high spots.

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