Stephen Harrigan

Stephen Harrigan is the author of nine books, including the award-winning novels The Gates of the Alamo and Remember Ben Clayton. His most recent book is the forthcoming The Eye of the Mammoth, a career-spanning collection of his essays, many of which were written for Texas Monthly. He is also a screenwriter who has written many movies for television. 

Stories

Twisting the Night Away

South Texas went into a frenzy preparing for Hurrican Allen, then the guest of honor never showed up.

Capote Changes Coler

In Music for Chameleons it’s hard to tell whether Truman Capote is telling the whole truth or nothing at all of the truth; Conspiracy ferrets out much of the truth about John F. Kennedy’s murder.

The Crime and the Pity

Michael Mewshaw reopens the case of a boyhood friend who murdered his parents’ Rober Shattuck reexamines the story of the Wild Boy.

The Secret Life of the Beach

Along the silent, lovely beach, tiny armies fight in the tide, fierce battles rage in the sky, and nocturnal marauders slither across the sand.

Lawn Boy

Here’s how to achieve inner peace, perfect serenity, spiritual calm, and a nice, neat lawn.

Lawn Boy

Here’s how to achieve inner peace, perfect serenity, spiritual calm, and a nice, neat lawn.

Angle of Reflection

Wallace Stegner’s love of the West and respect for its history make his works as distinctive as the region that inspired them.

Angle of Reflection

Wallace Stegner’s love of the West and respect for its history make his works as distinctive as the region that inspired them.

Gonna Take a Sedimentary Journey

Roadside Geology of Texas makes traveling a rocky road fun. In the Shining Mountains finds nature tarnished, but The Spawning Run shows it unspoiled.

On the Edge of Texas

For hundreds of years man—from the Comanche to the backpacker—has tried to conquer Big Bend. Still, it remains wild, stark, and pristine.

The Secret Life of Chester Seltzer

Gordon Baxter’s Village Creek is just barely navigable. Amado Muro was a bohemian before it was fashionable.

Down in the Depths

The intricate underwater passages and pristine water of Jacob’s Well fascinate drivers. Too often, the fascination proves fatal.

Down in the Depths

The intricate underwater passages and pristine water of Jacob’s Well fascinate drivers. Too often, the fascination proves fatal.

Dr. Updike

John Updike’s problems are our pleasures. Mean Scrooge McDuck returns in a nostalgic comic-book collection.

Dr. Updike

John Updike’s problems are our pleasures. Mean Scrooge McDuck returns in a nostalgic comic-book collection.

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