Stephen Harrigan

Stephen Harrigan is the author of nine books, including the award-winning novels The Gates of the Alamo and Remember Ben Clayton. His most recent book is the forthcoming The Eye of the Mammoth, a career-spanning collection of his essays, many of which were written for Texas Monthly. He is also a screenwriter who has written many movies for television. 

Stories

Angle of Reflection

Wallace Stegner’s love of the West and respect for its history make his works as distinctive as the region that inspired them.

Angle of Reflection

Wallace Stegner’s love of the West and respect for its history make his works as distinctive as the region that inspired them.

Gonna Take a Sedimentary Journey

Roadside Geology of Texas makes traveling a rocky road fun. In the Shining Mountains finds nature tarnished, but The Spawning Run shows it unspoiled.

On the Edge of Texas

For hundreds of years man—from the Comanche to the backpacker—has tried to conquer Big Bend. Still, it remains wild, stark, and pristine.

The Secret Life of Chester Seltzer

Gordon Baxter’s Village Creek is just barely navigable. Amado Muro was a bohemian before it was fashionable.

Down in the Depths

The intricate underwater passages and pristine water of Jacob’s Well fascinate drivers. Too often, the fascination proves fatal.

Down in the Depths

The intricate underwater passages and pristine water of Jacob’s Well fascinate drivers. Too often, the fascination proves fatal.

The Baby Factory

At Houston’s Jefferson Davis Hospital, the wonders of modern medicine collide with the raw realities of birth, poverty, neglect and hope.

Dr. Updike

John Updike’s problems are our pleasures. Mean Scrooge McDuck returns in a nostalgic comic-book collection.

Dr. Updike

John Updike’s problems are our pleasures. Mean Scrooge McDuck returns in a nostalgic comic-book collection.

The Baby Factory

At Houston’s Jefferson Davis Hospital, the wonders of modern medicine collide with the raw realities of birth, poverty, neglect and hope.

Memoir of the Soil

A.C. Greene’s singular, exquisite vision of West Texas; a thriller that’s better than it should be; and a historical novel with too much history.

Memoir of the Soil

A.C. Greene’s singular, exquisite vision of West Texas; a thriller that’s better than it should be; and a historical novel with too much history.

The Right Wings

In his new book Tom Wolfe poses this question: were the Mercury astronauts men or monkeys? Thomas Thompson changes his journalistic setting from Houston to the far East to produce a book about an astonishing criminal.

Say, Have You Heard the One About Cactus Pryor?

Don’t look now, but the rather odd gentleman with the suspicious accent and outlandish military getup may not be exactly what he seems.

Pages