Furry Friday: A Mason County Rancher's Dog Is the Most Loyal Pooch You'll Read About This Week

When JR Nicholson, a rancher from Mason County,* started feeling dizzy, he told his ranch hand he wanted to go to the hospital. Little did the 85-year-old know that what turned out to be a minor visit to the ER would evolve into an absolutely heartwarming tale of pet loyalty for the ages.

Meanwhile, in Texas . . .

  • Identical twin sisters from Houston bought identical Sears Craftsman housesright next door to each otherin Galveston.
  • After getting plunked by a pitcher, a man in a pickup baseball game near Elsa shot and wounded one of the opposing players.
  • An Austin girl who was kidnapped by her mother and taken to Mexico was reunited with her father twelve years after her abduction.
  • The SAT math scores of the state’s high school students hit a 22-year low.
  • At their wedding ceremony, a neuroscientist gave his ne

The Texanist

Q: I read your response to “Displaced Derek in Portland” in the July issue with interest. You see, I recently made my own return to the blessed land following twenty years in exile among the tree-hugging set. During my hiatus, much has changed: Bonfire has been tamed, microbrews are rampant, and I seem to have less endurance now than in my youth along the Brazos. What should be on my bucket list so that I can reconnect with Texas in the time that remains to me

Far From the Madding Crowd

This academic year, the University of Texas at El Paso is celebrating its centennial, and Diana Natalicio, the school’s president, is marking her twenty-sixth anniversary in the school’s top job. That’s a remarkably long tenure, but even more remarkable are the changes UTEP has undergone during her administration. In 1988 the school offered one doctoral program; today it has twenty. In 1988 annual research expenditures were about $5 million; last year the number was $84 million.

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