Witness to an Execution

Stephen Lich was a college student when his father, Glen Ernst Lich, 48, was murdered in October 1997 by Ramiro Hernandez Llanas, a 28-year-old Mexican laborer. The crime took place at the family’s home, near Kerrville. In 2000 Hernandez was found guilty and sentenced to death. When, early this year, the convict was given an execution date, Lich, now a professor of economics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, chose to attend.

Zink Collection

ABOUT US

The ZINK story is that of the voyager.

We explore the world to find exceptional materials that have been handcrafted by artisans for generations. Each discovery adds cultural character to the classic heritage of ZINK design.

Whether you’re traveling across town or around the globe, our designs define the chic adventurer.

The Checklist

Art

“Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin & Bones, 20 Years of Drawing” (Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, April 26–August 3)
Houston resident Hancock has spent years creating art, inspired by comic books and abstract expressionism, that tells the story of mythical creatures called the Mounds. This exhibit, the first to focus on his drawings, includes samples of a cartoon strip he drew for his college newspaper at Texas A&M–Commerce. 

Answering the Call

In 2007, when Robert Jeffress became pastor of Dallas’s First Baptist Church, few people noticed. First Baptist, which was once regarded as the country’s most influential Southern Baptist church, was no longer packing in the crowds. But Jeffress, who grew up attending the church, had grand ambitions, including a $135 million fund-raising campaign to build a new downtown campus covering six blocks.

First Class All the Way

When the incomparable Washington power broker Robert Strauss died in March at the age of 95, the major obituaries trotted out the same stories about his sharp tongue and high self-regard that people had told for years. Like the one about the time he was serving as the administration’s special trade representative in the seventies and Jimmy Carter asked him if he would abide by a rule that members of the president’s staff fly coach instead of first class. “Mr.

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