Would Legalizing Gay Marriage Add $180 Million to the Texas Economy?

 

Anybody who has ever planned a big wedding has probably noticed that every aspect of it is expensive: The moment caterers, venues, chair-rental companies, DJs, etc, etc, etc, hear the word “wedding,” the prices seem to spike at least 20 percent. When you multiply that by the number of people on the guest list, the numbers add up. 

Beyoncé Gave $7 Million to St. John's Downtown in Houston to Help Feed and House the Homeless

Gushing about Beyoncé has become the currency of the Internet. Queen Bey inspires passion from fans and observers that is downright religious in fervor—which, perhaps, makes the fact that she’s taken to feeding and housing the poor of Houston something to be expected. 

Is Dallas a True International City?

Earlier this month, Dallas failed once again to be considered as a potential host city for the Summer Olympics. This decision wasn’t made by the International Olympic Committee—the city’s bid never made it that far. Instead, it was rejected by the U.S. Olympic Committee, a domestic organization that helps determine which U.S. cities that want to throw their hat in the Olympics-hosting ring have the best shot at bringing the Games back to U.S. soil. The USOC dumped Dallas, and kept Boston, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., and San Francisco. 

It was a familiar tale for Olympics-watchers who’d longed to see the Games played in Big D; a similar bid for the 2012 Summer Games was rejected in 2001. The United States has hosted the Olympics Games more than any other country, with four each among the Summer Olympics and the Winter Games. Those host cities include Salt Lake City, which hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics, and Atlanta, which put on the 1996 Summer Games, as well as such locales as Lake Placid, New York; Squaw Valley, California; and Los Angeles, which has twice played host to the event.

In a report from the Dallas Morning News, staff writer Jeff Mosier lays out the reason why Dallas continues to play bridesmaid, rather than bride, when it comes to the Olympics

Local Olympic organizers in 2001 said Dallas’ perceived lack of international stature sabotaged its pursuit of the 2012 Summer Games. A statement from the U.S. Olympic Committee — after Dallas was dropped this month from consideration for the 2024 games — hinted at the same issue.

That statement said there were no doubts about Dallas’ ability to host the Olympics, and the USOC planned to work with the officials to “enhance the international awareness of the city.” For those who worked on the Dallas 2012 bid, the new wording evokes memories of the early 2000s.

“I’m not sure much has changed in the past 14 years,” former Arlington Mayor Richard Greene said about how Olympic officials view the region.

He and Ron Kirk, Dallas’ mayor at the time, both blamed the failure of the 2012 effort on the area’s lack of international appeal.

“They did say, ‘We are really looking for a city with an international profile,’” Kirk told The Dallas Morning News at the time. “We still have work to do in terms of becoming well-known around the world.”

In other words, if the world’s Olympics-attending community is going to spend 17 days enjoying a city, it appears that the USOC lacks the confidence that Dallas is where they’d like to do it. 

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