At CPAC, Rick Perry Delivers Second Speech Since Ending Campaign

Three weeks to the day after Perry ended his presidential campaign, he tried to reclaim some of the spotlight with a speech to a packed room at the Conservative Political Action Conference.
Fri February 10, 2012 8:05 pm
Associated Press | J. Scott Applewhite

Three weeks to the day after Governor Rick Perry removed his hat from the (presidential campaign) ring, he tried to reclaim some of the spotlight with a speech to a packed room at the Conservative Political Action Conference.

While Perry mentioned didn’t mention Newt Gingrich (whom he endorsed as he dropped out of the race) or Mitt Romney, the governor did use his speech to urge conservative Republicans not to “settle,” the Los Angeles Times’ Michael Memoli recounted. Perry said:

We do the American people no great service if we replace the current embodiment of big government with a lukewarm version of the same. What 2012 offers us is the chance to offer a starkly different vision for America. We can’t tinker our way to victory. We’ve got to be bold.

Perry seemed to reprise many of the lines he used on Monday at his Reagan Day speech to the Williamson County Republican Party, including, “Aggies never lose. We just run out of time … So you could say that my presidential campaign just ran out of time,” he said at CPAC, according to the Washington Post’s David Fahrenthold. (The Right Scoop has video of the full speech.)

The presence of Perry, Michele Bachmann, and Herman Cain led NPR’s Ari Shapiro to liken this year’s conference to the reunion show at the end of a reality series. ABC News’s Matt Negrin noted that with Perry and Bachmann both drawing cheers with their speeches Thursday, CPAC “seemed to lurch into a time warp.” For many conservatives in the audience, “the blast from the past was a bittersweet glimpse at what could have been had Bachmann and Perry managed to stay in the race,” Negrin wrote.

Now free from the stressful, day-to-day grind of the campaign, these appearances suggest that Perry hopes to burnish his image, with his eye perhaps on another presidential bid in 2016.

“As you say in Texas, you have to get back up on the horse,” Tim Hagle, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, told the Houston Chronicle’s Richard Dunham. “He couldn’t just sit in Austin

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