Y’all in the Family

What Natalie Maines Learned From Her Father. What Lloyd Maines Learns From His Daughter. A Tale Of Kinship And Country Music.
Thanks, Dad: Lloyd suggested that Natalie try out for the Dixie Chicks.
Photograph by Danny Turner

“Stand straight. Keep your chin down. Relax. Quit worrying you’ll look like you’re a goober.”

For most of Natalie Maines’s life, her father, Lloyd, the potential goober, was her major influence. He was the one with the music career—the revered producer of records by everyone from Jerry Jeff Walker to Wayne Hancock, and a wicked-good steel guitar player to boot—and she obviously learned from him well, though his teachings were so low-key and subtle that she realizes today she learned most everything by osmosis. And it was he who facilitated the deal that landed her in the Dixie Chicks, her ticket to the big time. But in this East Austin photographer’s studio, before lights and cameras that are completely foreign to a behind-the-scenes player like Lloyd, she’s the one who calls the shots. She has even loaned him the makeup artist she had flown in from Nashville (standard operating procedure when you’re a chart-topping country star) and taken the time to give him a few tips on applying foundation. Natalie’s on a much-deserved break from the road right now, she has told me, turning down all requests for interviews and media ops. But since her dad is involved, she has made an exception. She’d do anything for him.

And he for her. Reflecting his laid-back approach to life, 48-year-old Lloyd patiently waits for his daughter to strike a pose before he straightens up and places his hands on her shoulders. His idea of mischief is to make devil’s horns with his fingers behind her head. For her part, 25-year-old Natalie—whose public image is that of a bubbly spitfire hardly able to contain her energy and always looking as if she’s about to burst into song—handles the session like a seasoned pro, cool, calm, and quiet, until she turns on the perky charisma and flashes a radiant smile in anticipation of the whirs and clicks.

Posing is business as usual for her. She’s used to having all eyes on her—in this case, makeup artists, publicists, photographers, and photographer’s assistants, who do what they do so she

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