The Problem With Prop 1

I'm sorry, but I just can't get excited about voting for Proposition 1, which provides a meager amount of funding, around $1.7 billion, for new transportation projects. The amount to be spent is so small that it is hardly worth the effort of putting the proposition on the ballot.

And the Voting Begins

UPDATE: In my original post, I mistakenly referred to previous endorsements by some of the state's major newspapers, and I have corrected the errors.

This election has all the earmarks of being one of the strangest ever. First, as I have opined before, this is the weakest ticket the Republican party has put forward in decades. There is just no appeal to it, from top (Abbott) to bottom (Paxton). Second, the Democrats have better down-ballot candidates than the Republicans. Mike Collier, the Democratic candidate for comptroller, is a CPA. His opponent, Glenn Hegar, knows next to nothing about state government finance, and what he does know he learned from the current comptroller, which is hardly a recommendation. The R's candidate for attorney general, Ken Paxton, has pled guilty to violating state securities laws. His Democratic opponent is Sam Houston, a real lawyer and litigator. The Republicans' candidate for agriculture commissioner is Sid Miller, one of the churliest lawmakers ever to set foot in the Capitol. Jim Hogan, by contrast, the Democratic candidate for ag commissioner, is a salt-of-the-earth fellow.

Dallas's Ebola Road

Just before dawn Wednesday morning, more than twelve television cameramen had set up their tripods in front of the yellow police tape cordoning off the Village Bend East apartments, a sprawling complex of brown stucco and redbrick buildings between Greenville Avenue and Skillman Street, just north of Lovers Lane, in Dallas. Two news helicopters did slow circles overhead. City officials and health workers had arrived at the 330-unit complex around 4 a.m.

Victims

On Friday Wendy Davis released an ad attacking her opponent, Greg Abbott, which elicited an immediate and nearly universal backlash. Sarah Rumpf, over at Breitbart Texas, has a roundup of criticism from across the political spectrum. The entire political spectrum, including left-leaning national outlets such as Mother Jones and MSNBC.

Among the critics quoted is me. My initial reaction was that the ad was “mean-spirited and misleading”. I think most people agree with the first point, at least. The ad is, at best, weird, crass, and glib about the 1984 accident that left Abbott partially paralyzed at age 27; even Davis’s defenders were put off by the tone and framing. Some of her supporters have, however, defended the point that the Davis campaign was presumably trying to make: that after successfully suing for damages himself, Abbott has “spent his career working against other victims.” I still think it’s misleading, for reasons explained after the jump. 

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