Payback’s a Glitch

The five members of the Dallas County Commissioners’ Court unanimously voted for a resolution commemorating Juneteenth without realizing that it also endorsed reparations for slavery. Aside from Commissioner John Wiley Price, who put forth the resolution, none of the other commissioners had bothered to find out what was in the proposal before voting for it.

 

Asylum Politics

In a small visitation room with painted cinder-block walls and one-way mirrors inside an El Paso immigration detention center, Gurbinder Singh sits at a metal table fiddling with his blue ID bracelet. Printed on the plastic band are the 26-year-old’s grainy mug shot, his birth date, and, perhaps most important, his “date of arrival,” May 20, 2013. That was when Singh walked north across a bridge that spans the Rio Grande and, in the little English he knew, asked a border guard for political asylum.

Start Making Cents

Texas,” says Jeremy Kandah, “is the most Bitcoin-friendly state in the union.” Kandah, a member of the Austin venture capital group Bit-Angels Network, has his reasons for asserting that the Lone Star State is bullish on the headline-making virtual currency. BitAngels, after all, is in the business of convincing Bitcoin-related start-ups that Texas is where they should be turning for capital.

Sam Rayburn’s Bates List Finder

Sam Rayburn was one of the most powerful Texans of the twentieth century. A Democrat, he was first elected to Congress in 1912, and he represented the Fourth Congressional District, a slice of the blackland prairie of North Texas, for 48 years. He was speaker of the House in every Democrat-controlled Congress from 1940 until his death, in 1961, making him the longest-serving speaker in American history.

Bill Powers's Exit

UT president Bill Powers has been under pressure from UT regents for months, if not years, but the outcome of the debate over his future is now clear. Powers was the winner, and Rick Perry was the loser.

Powers got everything he wanted:

State Readies for Second Phase of Redistricting Trial

The U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas is going to reopen the redistricting case left over from 2011. The first phase of the case involves the maps for the Texas House of Representatives; the second involves the U.S. House maps for 2011. The case comes at an inconvenient time for Attorney General Greg Abbott, who will be spending considerable time on the campaign trail.

Asleep at the Switch

Wendy Davis is asleep at the switch again. The Obama administration has opened a new front on the battle over Medicaid expansion. By 2016, says the White House, states that have adopted expansion will have saved $4.3 billion. In addition, expansion states would have experienced 3.3 million annual physicians' visits, 176,000 more cholesterol screenings, 44,000 more mammograms, and 97,000 fewer people experiencing depression. This ought to be a heaven-sent opportunity for Davis to distinguish herself from Abbott. Expansion would have saved Texas $3.1B in 2014, $10.4B by 2017. And yet, the state's Republican leaders are willing to allow their hatred for Barack Obama to get in the way of improving Texans' health, not to mention providing billions of dollars for doctors and hospitals.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Politics