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Silence at Baylor

A much-talked-about football player at Baylor University—whom coaches “expect back” this fall—is currently on trial for the sexual assault of a fellow student. Questions now swirl around what the program knew and when they knew it.

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AP Photo | Waco Tribune Herald, Rod Aydelotte

Editor’s note: This piece has been updated below to reflect that Samuel Ukwuachu was found guilty of second-degree sexual assault on August 20, 2015.

In early June, Baylor defensive coordinator Phil Bennett was a guest speaker at a luncheon in Fort Worth for the Baylor Sports Network. During his speech, he dropped a bit of long-anticipated information about the team’s plans: He expected defensive end Sam Ukwuachu—a Freshman All-American who transferred in 2013 from Boise State to Baylor only to miss 2014, his first eligible season with the Bears, for unspecified reasons—to finally take the field. It was a significant announcement for a program that’s a favorite pick to clinch one of four College Football Playoff spots, and it was reported by a breathless sports media eager to talk up head coach Art Briles’ program. No one questioned Bennett’s assertion that Ukwuachu was expected to play—even though Ukwuachu was due to stand trial in Waco for sexual assault in just a few weeks, and if convicted, could spend up to twenty years in prison.

No one questioned it because no one outside of Baylor knew. Ukwuachu was indicted on June 25, 2014, on two counts of sexual assault against a female Baylor student athlete, and for the next year, the legal process played out without mention of Ukwuachu’s felony charge by the press or from school officials, even though it was all in the public record.

So were the following facts: That Ukwuachu transferred to Baylor in May 2013 because he had been kicked off the Boise State team for a previous incident of violence involving a female student; that Ukwuachu claimed after the transfer was announced that Baylor’s coaches “knew everything” about what happened in Idaho; and, as indicated by court documents obtained by Texas Monthly, the two programs had some communication regarding Ukwuachu in which Boise State officials expressed reticence about supporting the player’s efforts to get back on the field.

As a player, Ukwuachu has been cast as a star in the making. As recently as August 4, CBS Sports’ BearsTruth Baylor fan blog listed the role of the DE as their top defensive storyline for the team. But the circumstances surrounding the school’s treatment of the allegations—from the nature of its disciplinary investigation and the fact that it characterized his indictment for sexual assault as “some issues” when explaining that he wouldn’t be on the active roster to start the 2014 season, to allowing him to continue doing conditioning work with the team after his indictment last June—suggest a school and a program that were, at best, very much in denial about the seriousness of the criminal charges he now faces.

Jury selection in Ukwuachu’s trial began Monday, and during in limine motions to determine what evidence would be admissible, assistant district attorney Hilary Laborde, who is prosecuting the case, told 54th District Judge Matt Johnson that Baylor’s own investigation into the accusations against Ukwuachu involved interviewing just Ukwuachu, his accuser, and one friend of each, and that the school never saw the rape kit collected by the sexual assault nurse examiner. The woman Ukwuachu is accused of sexually assaulting went to the hospital and talked to the police on October 20, 2013, the day after the encounter. But after the school’s investigation (so insufficient, according to the court, that the judge sustained a motion from the prosecution to restrict the defense from referencing it during the trial), Baylor took no action to discipline Ukwuachu, even while charges were still pending. From Baylor’s brief investigation, to its failure to consider disciplinary action, to its defensive coordinator’s statements this summer about the player’s expected return, the school’s idea of how to respond to serious rape allegations is seriously out of step with that of the courts.

***

The night of October 19, 2013, was Homecoming Weekend for Baylor. The Bears had just beaten Iowa State 71-7. After Iowa State forced a punt on the team’s first possession, Baylor scored touchdowns on every one of its next eight possessions. Iowa State only scored with 47 seconds left in the game, and Baylor even matched that touchdown with a 97-yard score on the ensuing kickoff return to close out the night. Ukwuachu, who was ineligible to play the 2013 season because of NCAA rules regarding transfer students, was celebrating nonetheless—as was an 18-year-old student whom McLennan County* Court documents refer to as Jane Doe, who went to a party at Waco’s downtown convention center, where many of her fellow students were celebrating.

The two were friendly, and shortly before two in the morning, Ukwuachu texted Doe, who replied to his message by saying that she would call him. During her testimony Tuesday, she said that she had called him moments later and agreed to go with him to get something to eat or to go to another party—but after he picked her up that night, he turned the wrong way out of her apartment complex and drove her to his apartment instead. Doe’s testimony regarding what happened in his apartment is disturbing. She described Ukwuachu as extremely agitated, getting angry with his dog and with a friend on the phone, who was in from out of town. After she resisted his initial advances, Doe testified, he began to grab her. “He was using all of his strength to pull up my dress and do stuff to me,” she said. “He had me on my stomach on the bed, and he was on top of me.” Doe testified that he pulled her dress up, pulled her underwear to the side, and forced her legs open with his toes, her head pressed between his bed and his desk, then forced himself inside of her. Doe was a virgin at the time.

Texts between Ukwuachu and Doe from earlier in the week, before the encounter, were also revealed to the jury during trial. In those messages, Doe is unambiguous that she is not interested in a physical or romantic relationship with Ukwuachu; he sent her messages like “we have unfinished business,” in reference to a previous encounter, which she characterized as Ukwuachu trying to put “moves” on her. She replied “I don’t think we need finish any business” and “let’s just chill.”

The night at his apartment, she testified, “I was screaming stop and no.” According to her testimony, after he finished, he told her “This isn’t rape,” asked her if she was going to call the police, and left her to find a ride. Two of Doe’s friends arrived in the middle of the night to pick her up, at which point she told them that Ukwuachu had raped her. The next day, Doe went to the hospital and was subject to a sexual assault nurse examination, which found vaginal injuries including redness, bleeding, and friction injuries.

This isn’t the first violent incident that Ukwuachu has been accused of. In documents from May 2013 obtained by Texas Monthly, Marc Paul, the assistant athletics director at Boise State University, recounts advising to Ukwuachu’s then-girlfriend in Boise that she stay away from the house the two shared for several nights, after he put his fist through a window while drunk. Paul also makes plans for how to get police protection for the couple’s other housemate, who received threatening text messages from Ukwuachu. Handwritten notes in a document from a Boise State source also refer to times that Ukwuachu would get verbally abusive over “small irritants” like a spilled drink, and note that the woman he lived with acknowledged that she would “probably not” admit it if the abuse were physical. It ends with the words “NOT healthy relationship!” underlined.

Following the incident with the window, Ukwuachu—just a year removed from his Freshman All-American season—was kicked off the team by Boise State head coach Chris Petersen for repeated violations of team rules.

The same month, in an interview with football recruiting website Rivals.com after he announced his transfer to Baylor, Ukwuachu talked about returning home to his native Texas. He said he had gone through “some personal problems” and that the coaching staff at Baylor “knew everything and were really supportive.” It’s impossible to know what Ukwuachu means by “everything,” but six-foot-four pass rushers who are voted Freshman All-American and win starting jobs on programs the quality of Boise State’s don’t often find themselves suddenly without a team. Regardless of whether Ukwuachu’s statement that Baylor’s coaches “knew everything” is accurate, when the program sought a waiver that would have allowed Ukwuachu to play for the Bears without waiting the mandatory one-year period required of most transfer students, Boise State informed the school that they would not be providing a letter of support.

Ukwuachu’s arrival at Baylor was met with great fanfare. Fan blogs celebrated the transfer, and his addition to the team came just as Briles’ program was heating up: the team was about to begin back-to-back 11-2 seasons, and they had just broken ground on the construction of the gorgeous, state-of-the-art McLane Stadium. But in addition to sitting out the 2013 season because he couldn’t be granted a waiver, Ukwuachu also missed the 2014 season for reasons the school never specified.

The reason that Ukwuachu missed the 2014 season is because of the indictment on two counts of felony sexual assault, a fact that Ukwuachu’s attorney, Jonathan Sibley, confirmed in the press more than a year after the indictment was issued.

Baylor officials either knew, or should have known, that Ukwuachu had a history of violent incidents at Boise State. The football program knew that even though he was a rising star and a defensive starter for the Broncos, he had been kicked off that team following a 4.5-sack, 7 tackle-for-loss season. And in August 2013, Chad Jackson, a senior associate athletic director at Baylor, was informed by John Cunningham, an associate athletic director at Boise State, that Ukwuachu’s previous school did not support any waivers to get the player back on the field. When Briles’ program brought Ukwuachu to Baylor, they did so amid media reports that the player had a disciplinary history that his previous program took seriously enough to kick him off the team.

Baylor’s treatment of the charges against Ukwuachu aren’t consistent with a program that takes those charges seriously. Coach Briles and Bennett declined comment to Texas Monthly regarding Ukwuachu’s case, but Phil Bennett, the team’s defensive coordinator, did comment in June, and his comment was that he expected to see Ukwuachu on the field in the fall. We don’t know why Bennett was publicly espousing his belief that Ukwuachu would be notching up sacks in 2015 even while he was privately aware that the player could well be on his way to a 20 year prison sentence. But this also isn’t the first instance of Baylor’s football program failing to take rape accusations against its players seriously—or of Waco law enforcement making questionable decisions when they involve accusations against Baylor football players, as well.

***

In 2012, a Baylor linebacker named Tevin Elliott was arrested for sexual assault. At the time of his arrest, Briles said only that the player would be suspended because he had “violated a team policy” and that he’d have no further comment. After Elliott’s conviction on two counts of sexual assault—in a trial that included four other witnesses who said that Elliott had raped them too—details about how the school had reacted to the victim’s claims prior to Elliott’s conviction began to trickle out. The Baylor Lariat quoted the victim’s mother as saying that the school “was not helpful in guiding her daughter during this academically stressful time,” and that the accuser lost her scholarship following the assault. The paper went on to cite the prosecutor, who claimed that “Waco Police Department detectives failed to follow through with victim interviews.”

That’s a playbook that’s familiar in Ukwuachu’s case, as well. While Jane Doe went to the hospital immediately following her encounter with Ukwuachu and spoke with an officer there, detectives suspended the case after taking a report and investigating. But it wasn’t until months later that the details made their way to a prosecutor’s desk—and once they finally did, assistant district attorney Hilary Laborde found enough in the investigation to pursue felony sexual assault charges against Ukwuachu. The incident between Ukwuachu and Doe occurred on October 20, 2013, but he wasn’t indicted until June 25 of the following year. (In Elliott’s case, it took the police two weeks from the time the victim reported the incident to the time he was arrested.)

Per testimony from her counselor at Baylor, Cheryl Wooten, Doe was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder following the encounter. When Doe sought to avoid Ukwuachu on campus, the school didn’t move him out of the classes or tutoring sessions the two shared—instead, she had to adjust her schedule. Eventually, Doe found her own scholarship reduced, and she transferred to another university after the 2013-14 school year, while Ukwuachu graduated in May. (If Ukwuachu is acquitted at trial, he’ll be playing football as a graduate student.)

It took eight months for Ukwuachu to be indicted, but that indictment also went unreported for more than a year. That’s significant when you consider that Waco is a city with a population smaller than 130,000, and the man accused of felony sexual assault is a football player for one of the nation’s top programs. Local sports media seemed curiously incurious about Ukwuachu’s suspension for a violation of team rules, though rumors certainly indicated that some people on the school’s campus knew which team rule Ukwuachu violated: Baylor fan boards included students telling each other things like “you’re hearing the same things that I’m hearing and it’s serious” and “If you like guys like Tevin Elliot[t], then you want Ukwuachu on this team.” Yet still, it would seem no local reporters on the Baylor beat managed to make the trip to the downtown courthouse to type the name “Ukwuachu” to confirm if the rumors were true.

Transparency was further muddled when Laborde filed for, and received, a gag order preventing herself, Sibley, or Ukwuachu from talking to the press. In fact, almost no one connected with the case was willing to speak on the record—multiple interview requests to Laborde, Sibley, Boise State associate athletic director Marc Paul, Baylor head coach Art Briles, Baylor defensive coordinator Phil Bennett, and Baylor Associate Dean for Student Conduct Bethany McCraw were all declined. Even a Freedom of Information Act request filed by Texas Monthly with the Waco Police Department for documents relating to the department’s investigation and Ukwuachu’s arrest following his indictment was met with a letter declaring that all information outside of the Incident Report following Doe’s visit to Hillcrest Hospital the day after her encounter with Ukwuachu was exempt from the law requiring disclosure.

Meanwhile, the details about the investigation conducted by Baylor that came out during the trial reveal one that was shockingly brief: It involved reading text messages, looking at a polygraph test Ukwuachu had independently commissioned—which is rarely admissible in court—and contacting Ukwuachu, Doe, and one witness on behalf of each of them. Ukwuachu’s roommate, Peni Tagive, is the primary witness in his defense. During opening statements, Sibley—Ukwuachu’s attorney—claimed that Tagive would be able to testify that he had been present at the time of the incident, and neither saw nor heard any signs of the struggle that Doe claims ensued. During her testimony, Doe stated several times that she doesn’t believe that Tagive was in the apartment, and prosecutor Robert F. Moody said in his opening statement that “We’re not going to call him, because we don’t believe he’s trustworthy.”Part of the reason Moody might not trust Tagive’s testimony is that after Tagive—a running back for the Bears—was subpoenaed, he spent two nights in jail for contempt of court after he failed to appear for his grand jury summons, and was required to wear an ankle monitor upon his release to ensure that he would appear to testify. Tagive’s statements may have been considered persuasive to Baylor in its investigation, but he clearly went to some lengths to avoid making them under oath.

We don’t know yet whether Sam Ukwuachu will be convicted of the charges against him—but we know that the program recently (and eagerly) expressed its intention to add the six-foot-four pass rusher to their rotation at defensive end in time for the season opener at SMU. What we do know is that Baylor took a chance on a player they had every reason to suspect had previously presented a threat to students at another campus, and let Baylor’s students assume the risk that entailed. When a student at Baylor leveled accusations of sexual assault against the player, the school’s investigation—in which the burden of proof is significantly lower than in a court of law—ended without action, despite the fact that the McLennan County District Attorney’s Office found cause to take the matter all the way to a trial on second degree felony charges. We know that officials in Baylor’s football program describe rape accusations against players on the team as “some issues” or “violating a team rule,” the same language they might use to describe a player who broke curfew—even after the player has been accused, indicted, arrested, and, in the case of Tevin Elliott, convicted. We know that the Waco Police Department took months to bring the case to a prosecutor, but that when they did present the case to the DA’s office, the DA took the felony charges all the way to court. We know that the Waco sports media, charged with covering one of the country’s most prominent football programs, failed to report on charges against a much-heralded new transfer for nearly fourteen months, even though those charges were readily accessible to anyone who searched his name at the McLennan County Courthouse. We know that when asked about Ukwuachu a few weeks ahead of his scheduled trial date, rather than acknowledge the charges or decline to comment, Baylor defensive coordinator Phil Bennett told Baylor fans that the team was expecting to have him on the field.

And we know that, when asked about Ukwuachu by the Waco Tribune-Herald after news of the charges finally broke—more than a year after the initial indictment—Baylor head coach Art Briles told reporters, “I like the way we’ve handled it as a university, an athletic department, and a football program.”

Update (8/20/15 8:31pm): Samuel Ukwuachu was found guilty of second-degree sexual assault. He is expected to be sentenced on August 21, 2015. Following the conviction, Baylor University’s assistant vice president for media communications sent the following statement:

Acts of sexual violence contradict every value Baylor University upholds as a caring Christian community. In recent years we have joined university efforts nationally to prevent campus violence against women and sexual assault, to actively support survivors of sexual assault with compassion and care, and to take action against perpetrators. We have established and fully staffed a Title IX office that employs a Title IX Coordinator and two full-time investigators. Maintaining a safe and caring community is central to Baylor’s mission and at the heart of our commitment to our students, faculty and staff.

*Correction: A previous version of this article misspelled McLennan County. We regret the error.

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  • halaleezy

    This piece appears to be very thoroughly researched, but not entirely objective. Typically articles on a trial mention both sides – the prosecution and the defense. This one only mentions the prosecution’s case. Why the paucity of information on the defense, unless the authors are intentionally trying to slant the public perception of the case?

    Furthermore, why is the outrage about the lack of disclosure in this case directed solely at the local Waco media, when esteemed publications such as Texas Monthly had every bit of the freedom to look into the allegations that the Waco media did? If there is a gag order on the case (requested by the prosecution, I might add), why is it significant to note that all those reached for comment on this article refused to do so? The penalty for violating a gag order is to be held in contempt of court. Are you really so shocked that no one would voluntarily hold themselves in contempt for the purposes of a one-sided article? Sometimes the arrogance of the media baffles me. Others, it’s just par for the course. This falls under the latter.

    • jk

      “Why the paucity of information on the defense, unless the authors are intentionally trying to slant the public perception of the case?”

      WHAT defense? Or, rather, what defense is available for them to report? Baylor officials sure as hell aren’t talking about it. Peni Tagive, Ukwuachu’s roommate, is the defense’s primary witness, and it’s pretty obvious he’s not being cooperative, considering he ignored a grand jury subpoena. (Also, note that the trial just started three days ago. The defense may not have even presented its case yet.)

      “Furthermore, why is the outrage about the lack of disclosure in this case directed solely at the local Waco media, when esteemed publications such as Texas Monthly had every bit of the freedom to look into the allegations that the Waco media did?”

      In case you’re unfamiliar with Texas Monthly, college sports aren’t exactly its normal beat, and its entire staff is based in Austin. I would assume they didn’t look into the accusations earlier because Baylor did such an exceptionally good job of keeping them obfuscated from public view; in other words, they were just as in the dark about it as the general public until recently.

      That said, there’s a considerable difference between Austin-based general-interest magazine writers and Waco-based newspaper reporters on the sports beat; one *expects* the latter to know just about everything going on at BU, particularly in a town as small as Waco (where life quite literally revolves around Baylor football) and especially when a fairly high-profile transfer player goes two full seasons without playing (and without explanation from team officials). That’s one of the main *points* of the TM article: members of the local press likely knew the whole story, as did various Baylor officials, but actively sought to avoid mentioning it solely for the purposes of protecting its football program — and this being Texas, football is the single highest priority for many people.

      “If there is a gag order on the case (requested by the prosecution, I might add), why is it significant to note that all those reached for comment on this article refused to do so?”

      Uh, because the gag order only applies to the defendant, his counsel, and the prosecutor? (as is plainly stated in the article) There is NO valid reason — legal or otherwise — for Baylor officials to continue to not only refuse to comment, but actively STATE that Ukwuachu will likely be out on the field in a couple of weeks. That’s not just stretching the truth; it’s flat-out bullshit.

      “The penalty for violating a gag order is to be held in contempt of court. Are you really so shocked that no one would voluntarily hold themselves in contempt for the purposes of a one-sided article?”

      Are you really so quick to judge the writers for some nonexistent “hatchet job” that you can’t even bother to digest the plain facts of their article before launching an attack against them?

      “Sometimes the arrogance of the media baffles me.”

      Sometimes the willful blindness of those defending accused rapists baffles *me*.

      • halaleezy

        If you think Waco revolves around Baylor football, you obviously know nothing about Baylor football.

        • cutedog2

          Having a kid that atttended Baylor, I can assure you businesses disagree with that statement. Baylor brings a lot of money into Waco on game weekend. Hotel prices double on game weekend.

        • G_David

          Surely you jest.

        • Teddy Jack Eddy

          halaleezy come join us in realville.

    • jk

      Y’all might wanna take a look at the update above: GUILTY AS CHARGED. Halaleezy, you are *more* than welcome to offer us a comment on your thoughts in light of the verdict.

      • halaleezy

        I think that the jury had more information than you, I or anyone else commenting or writing these articles did, and they made the best decision based on the information they had. I’m not rejoicing in the fact that two young people’s lives are forever altered (hopefully not ruined, I believe in redemption for the accused, and restoration for the victim). Mr. Ukwuachu had his day in court, and the American justice system worked as it should. Those are my thoughts. Hopefully they live up to your lofty standards, Captain Kirk.

        • jk

          “I think that the jury had more information than you, I or anyone else commenting or writing these articles did, and they made the best decision based on the information they had.”

          Fully agreed that the jury had far more information than any other party — particularly outside the courtroom — but I hope I’m not misreading the latter part of your sentence. “[B]ased on the information they had” could be read as “…even though it was plainly lacking.” Again, I might just be overanalyzing.

          “two young people’s lives are forever altered (hopefully not ruined, I believe in redemption for the accused, and restoration for the victim)”

          First off, one person’s life was forever altered when she became the victim of a sexual predator. Whether her life can be “restored” is questionable, but having worked with sexual assault victims, I know that many of them end up having life-long issues when it comes to trusting their romantic partners. As for redemption for the accused, I’ll believe it when I see it.

          “the American justice system worked as it should.”

          Not entirely. It’s inexcusable that Waco police didn’t give the case file to the DA’s office for *months* after the attack, particularly given that the results of the victim’s rape-kit test clearly indicated an assault took place, and also that it took a full eight months to indict Ukwuachu.

        • The 1hyperborean

          “I’m not rejoicing in the fact that two young people’s lives are forever altered (hopefully not ruined,” …

          Nicely P.C. One is definitely going to be changed unfortunately forever.

          And the other is apparently a serial sexual assault artist or for non PC, queers a Serial Rapist. Who needs to have his nuts cut off. I am quite sure he has history all the way back to H.S. But for Baylor to sacrifice everything at the alter of winning.. I can understand it. They have been a doormat for as long as most have been alive and are desperate in seeing a legacy created. Apparently at all costs

    • Pip

      I hope you don’t have any daughters. You should forward this to your mother and see what she thinks.

      • halaleezy

        I’m not sure what whether or not I have a daughter has to do with my belief that everyone in America is afforded due process, and I wasn’t wanting to send this guy to this gas chamber prior to his day in court, but I’ll take your word for it (and apparently everyone else who has a daughter) that having one makes you willingly disregard the Constitution and openly pine for vigilante justice. I’ll make sure to lose my damn mind once my daughter is born in 4.5 months.

        • The 1hyperborean

          I am sure you will be perfectly fine in letting her date football players. You probably won’t even worry. It’s what libs do.. Ba’al is awaiting

          • LiotheMessi

            ah, awesome. no reason to bring in politics, but let’s go ahead and do it anyway.

          • Henry Ridgeway

            We’re talking about serious criminal misconduct at Baylor, a conservative Christian school run by noted right wing nut job Ken Starr. The coach, Art Briles, wrote a book about his “Christian faith,”and your comment is “It’s what libs do.” Sounds like Baylor could use a few “libs.”

          • jpf578

            If those libs are anything like Obama, Reid, Pelosi, or Billary, I’ll pass!

          • Serena Smith

            Make no mistake about this! I live in Waco. Baylor supporters are FAR FROM LIBS!! In fact, they are extremely conservative. This is the type of town in which church attendance is expected and democrat is considered a curse word. No, my friends, libs are not the problem. The problem is that Waco is under the misconception that Baylor is an almost ivy league university that has a nationally acclaimed sports program and that the “Baylor Nation” somehow is superior to other universities so that the citizens consider themselves lucky to have Baylor in their town. Arrogance? yes! Despicable? yes! Liberal? Not even close!

          • Whirlwinder

            Serena, Waco may be conservative but Baylor is a bastion of socialism.

          • rmax

            With Kenny Starr as president; I can hardly believe that!

          • Ben Johnson

            Criminal misconduct by Ukwuachu? Correct. And he is now in jail because of it.

    • Ernie Perkins

      The fact that Ukwauchu was found guilty kind of renders your argument moot, Halaleezy.

    • Thomas Lestrade

      “the next day, Doe went to the hospital and was subject to a sexual assault nurse examination, which found vaginal injuries including redness, bleeding, and friction injuries.”

      So you’re saying that the medical examination which found obvious evidence of rape was imaginary?

    • Roman Berry

      May be that the defense wasn’t mentioned because a jury looked at the evidence and found the defense to be without merit. The man was convicted.

    • Halaleezy, you take Texas Monthly to task for revealing that Baylor, a private Christian university, conducted a half-baked investigation and protected a rapist on its campus, while penalizing his victim? Texas Monthly is arrogant? Your priorities are so out of whack you can’t see straight. This man was just convicted of raping a female student and you’re criticizing the magazine for printing too little of the football player’s defense? You’re interested in his motivation?

      In one of your previous comments you called out someone for suggesting you were blinded by loyalty to the Baylor football team. OK, if it’s not the football team that’s skewing your perspective, then what is it? In this entire scenario, the only thing that gets your dander up is the way the magazune wrote the story? Where’s your outrage about the school’s shoddy investigation and the Police Department dragging its feet? About the FB coaches and athletic department allowing the rapist to remain on the team?

      In the grand scheme, you’re swatting at a gnat buzzing nearby while ignoring the giant asteroid tearing through the sky. Try to remember a young woman was raped and suffered extreme physical harm. Who gives a crap if you think Texas Monthly is arrogant? They went and uncovered the truth when no one in Waco could be bothered.

      • Whirlwinder

        Give halaleezy a break. He is just a muslim trying to undermine everything he touches.

    • rmax

      The lead writer was a female. However the local press was a little less than curious.

      • rmax

        Also even though he was convicted, he only got six months jail time plus ten years probation. Seems kind of weak for sexual assault.

    • Ben Johnson

      No, it was not thoroughly researched. Its far on opinion and few on facts.

      https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CNCMOD_UcAAyu1e.jpg
      http://www.1660espn.com/tony-heath/
      http://www.kwtx.com/home/headlines/E…vice=phone&c=y

  • scotty c

    Waco is in McLennan county fyi. I would think that Texas Monthly should know the proper name of the county.

    • 8BallD

      It’s good to see that we’re focusing on the important pieces of the article and not the police report and the other know facts mentioned in the article.

      • Garrett

        Facts made “known” upon his indictment on June 25, 2014. That’s 22 days AFTER Bennett’s sole comment. Since the indictment, really immediately following, his playing privilege has been suspended pending acquittal.

        • Garrett

          Also, alliteration is kind of important!

        • WJ

          Bennett’s comments were made in June 2015, not June 2014. If he knew of the impending trial, which seems reasonable, he shouldn’t have said it, though as I noted elsewhere he should receive the benefit of the doubt that he wasn’t intentionally commenting on the merits of the case. If he didn’t know anything about it, then that raises the question as to whether and to what extent coaches should know about these issues so that they can avoid injudicious comments.

          • Garrett

            Wow, a rash mistake on my part. Totally agree. Have a feeling media backlash on a cursory investigation may incentivize a “guilty till proven innocent” philosophy now like the NFL teams’, i.e. a preliminary release from the program until and unless the athlete’s acquitted.

          • WJ

            The article doesn’t make it clear that the comment was recent. I only knew that because I read about it yesterday trying to figure out what the case involved.

    • Henry Ridgeway

      Nobody cares where Waco is.

  • Bryan Duncan

    So rather than commenting on the immorality of a Baptist University’s handling of a player with a suspected history of violence and sexual misconduct, you two choose to pick apart the story for its perceived lack of impartiality or an incorrect county name? You two are completely missing the point. Please share your astute thoughts on this article with you mothers or sisters and see if they echo your eloquent assessment of what is discussion worthy.

    • halaleezy

      I’m sorry Bryan, I was unaware that he had already been convicted of the crime at the time this article was written. It would seem, that since this is an ongoing legal matter, that guilt and lack thereof has not yet been established. That being the case, the jury may still find that the prosecution has not proven their case beyond a reasonable shadow of doubt, and Mr. Ukwuachu is subsequently acquitted. Does either result from the trial mean everything was handled in a perfect manner? Not by any means. I’m sure Baylor will learn from this tragic ordeal, and adjust their policies and procedures moving forward.

      My main complaint is that this article seems a lot more like a hit piece on Baylor (which Texas Monthly has done a few times in the past – just look at the “related content” at the bottom of the article) than it does an actual journalistic piece. It is well-researched, and I acknowledged that in my first comment. However, it is not fair to both sides of the case. If that wasn’t the goal, that’s the authors and editors’ of Texas Monthly’s decision to make. It will, however, have some impact on the public perception of this case, no matter what the court finds, and that’s unfortunate.

      I find your inclusion of my mother and sisters in your comment to be a ridiculous ad hominem, but if that’s how you want to roll, go for it, buddy.

      • Bryan Duncan

        Again, you imply that criticism should be aimed at media rather than an institution who clearly has attempted to pull wool over the eyes of the public. While Baylor may not be able to comment directly on the details of the case, they certainly have the right to disclose the nature of the “violation of team rules” or the indictment on sexual assault charges if they wanted to, but instead they remain as reticent as possible. You can wait for the verdict on the case before rushing to judgement on the player, that is both responsible and fair, but you can’t defend a University who places more importance on protecting the accused than it does on protecting the victim or the other 14,000 students on campus. There is enough cause for concern here to act on behalf of the safety of all students prior to an actual conviction and there is a precedent for it, unfortunately there is obviously far more concern about upholding the integrity of the football program and the university’s image as evidenced by their lack of response to the issue. Also, my hypothetical inclusion of your mothers or sisters is my attempt at persuading you to look at the case from a position of sympathy for the victim, by evoking emotions about women you respect or love; rather than from your position of defense for a university that doesn’t really have a good excuse for their actions. It’s not as if I am name calling. Face it, you don’t like that Baylor is being portrayed in a negative light but are not willing to admit that if they had taken control of the story by being upfront about the issues and addressing them in the first place, public ridicule wouldn’t be nearly as big an issue. This is such a fundamental emlement of public relations, but it was ignored because with the cooperation of Waco media, Waco PD, and Baylor itself; the hope was that this would just get swept under the rug and the good times would keep on rolling. Texas Monthly covers an entire state an is printed monthly if I am not mistaken. Believe it or not, most of their readers probably don’t give a damn about Baylor, which could explain why they were less informed about the situation than they could have been. Waco media covers anything Baylor related on a daily basis but never published or aired any details because either they are ignorant or complicit with the university’s attempts to hide this story. Since many fans or students on campus seemingly knew some details about the violation, there stands a strong chance that the local media was privy to this information enough so to take a further look. They didn’t though, and if they did they decided not to run with it, which is exactly why this is a big deal.

        • halaleezy

          My assertion here is that the wool has not been pulled over anyone’s eyes. You’re acting as though there is some massive conspiracy here. Based on what…this article?

          The trial itself and the allegations have been heavily covered by the Waco Tribune Herald. They’ve even had a reporter live-tweeting the entire trial, which I’m not sure would fly in other jurisdictions. There hasn’t been an attempt to cover anything up, in my opinion. I believe it is rather incompetency on the part of the Baylor investigator, whom I believe should be relieved of her duties after failing to get all the relevant facts before she decided that the alleged victim had no case.

          I certainly have sympathy for the alleged victim. I hope she gets the help, counseling, and healing she needs to recover, and if Ukwuachu is truly guilty, I hope he is punished to the fullest extent of the law.

          Could Baylor have handled the entire situation better? I definitely think so. Was the Texas Monthly piece unduly harsh and biased towards one side? I also definitely think so. It has nothing to do with not feeling sympathy for the victim here. You would not have seen me make a single comment if the article’s tone had been that they hope justice is served in what is a terrible situation. Instead, they took the route that because the first we ever heard of this was at the trial, there must have been some wide-ranging conspiracy to cover it up, even going so far as to cite internet message boards for sources (because we all know those are reliable, right?).

          I’m sure changes to the policies and procedures that Baylor uses in this type of case will be adjusted in the future. I am also sure that the fact that this type of thing will likely happen again, and necessitate policies and procedures, is a travesty. What I’m not sure of is what actually happened in this case, and I’m willing to wager that even people inside that courtroom aren’t either. But Texas Monthly apparently knows, and they want to tell the world.

          • Serena Smith

            Waco Tribune Herald “heavily covered” this? When? Where? Is there a supplement that only some people get?

        • jbprice

          “Believe it or not, most of their readers probably don’t give a damn about Baylor, which could explain why they were less informed about the situation than they could have been.”

          You must have missed the cover TM ran with just last year.

          • GenX

            How Ironic. Baylor will be crushed by the NCAA one day, just like SMU. Art Briles is a win at all costs piece of trash, as evidenced by … facts.

          • jbprice

            There are no facts that prove Briles did anything that was underhanded or illegal.

          • Bugme Nomor

            Yet he clearly lied about his knowledge of the situation. Was that because he feels guilty about putting Baylor students at risk? Or does he always cover his tracks to avoid accountability?

          • Chris Johnson

            How did he clearly lie about his knowledge of the situation? After SU was indicted, he was suspended from the team. Where is the coverup?

          • bigyaz

            Briles claimed he knew nothing about the player’s past. Former Boise State coach Chris Petersen immediately and forcefully called Briles a liar and that he (Petersen) called and spoke to Briles directly. Petersen clearly wasn’t going to let Briles get away with such a blatant lie.

          • BrandonWhite116

            “After Sam Ukwuachu was dismissed from the Boise State football program and expressed an interest in transferring to Baylor, I initiated a call with coach Art Briles. In that conversation, I thoroughly apprised Coach Briles of the circumstances surrounding Sam’s disciplinary record and dismissal.”

            This is Chris Petersen’s statement. Now please tell me where in this statement he calls Art Briles a liar. This statement doesn’t even contradict what Briles said. He says nothing of why Sam was dismissed from Boise State.

            And go read the live feed from the court case:
            http://www.wacotrib.com/news/twin-peaks-biker-shooting/sam-ukwuachu-trial-live-from-the-courtroom/article_55f899a8-47b9-11e5-8b52-abcb661cdfe1.html

            As it says in the trial feed, he was not dismissed from Boise because of his relationship with his ex girlfriend. He was dismissed because of other reasons.

          • Ricky, Bubbles & Julian

            THIS RIGHT HERE. briles have EVERY reason to lie about this. petersen has no reason to lie about this. this is kind of like hillary’s server fiasco: if she has nothing to hide why would she go to those lengths to buy and install her own server farm when all she needed was a hillary.cankles@SOS.GOV email address??

          • GenX

            Baylor harbored a rapist on campus for over a year in the hopes that the freshman all American could suit up.

          • LiotheMessi

            uh, he did accept a player to his football program despite knowledge that said player had a history of abusing women, and then he lied about knowing it. that’s underhanded.

          • Ben Johnson

            So Baylor should suspect that a kid with no criminal background, who was cleared to return to Boise State per their Deans office, who was recommended by not only his high school coach but Petersen, had a history of abusing women? If so, why didn’t Petersen and Boise State do something about it?

            https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CNCMOD_UcAAyu1e.jpg

          • Ricky, Bubbles & Julian

            in a legal sense, probably, but in a moral and responsible sense, briles was absolutely lacking in both

      • jk

        “I’m sure Baylor will learn from this tragic ordeal, and adjust their policies and procedures moving forward.”

        …except they already FAILED to do just that after Baylor linebacker Tevin Elliott was convicted of sexual assault three years ago — in a case with testimony from four *additional* women who claimed he raped them. After his indictment, the only thing team officials said was that he was suspended for “violating team policy.” They then said they’d have no further comment, and indeed, they had no further comment — even AFTER he was convicted, and AFTER details of how the school effectively “blamed the victim.”

        Why on *earth* do you think they’ll do any differently this time?

        • Ed Junker

          “Baylor will learn from this tragic ordeal…”

          Handlers of Baylor athletics cannot be faulted for their learning. Twelve years ago Baylor eventually had to own up to its broad and systematic knowledge of the murder of one of its athletes, Patrick Dennehy, by another of its athletes, Carlton Dotson. The university’s media attempts to spin the case unraveled as did its thorough effort to suppress evidence that the issues preceding and surrounding the incident were known up and down the line of insiders well beyond Baylor’s athletic department (http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/28/sports/college-basketball-death-and-deception.html)

          We are left to wonder how their improved “buttoning up”, learned and successfully practiced since Dennehy, came apart. The suppression of the Tevin Elliott events was so adept as to give us all reason to question how Baylor forgot all it had learned now that the Ukwuachu affair seems to be unpeeling.

        • GenX

          exactly jk… it’s a pattern. Let’s not forget the time one BU basketball player murdered another either.

      • Ricky, Bubbles & Julian

        hit piece or not baylor already has a history: big recruiting violations in basketball mid-90s, the dave bliss mess, the CONSTANT allegations by everyone from fans to other coaches about scott drew’s recruiting practices, and now this??? instead of being MORE lax in checking into the history of potential transfers it appears baylor is being as lax as possible without openly going to prisons and trying to sign up potential players. bottom line is (and i know because i have been INSIDE a major D-1 athletic program thru 4 years of college) a player of ukwuachu’s status doesn’t end up removed from a team for a few curfew violations, especially at a school like Boise who keeps knocking on the big-time stage. those schools usually do as much as they can to keep a player eligible and in good standing, until they do something so bad that they feel they can’t move forward with a person like that on their roster. knowing that, and briles KNOWS that coming from cougar high, baylor should have done an FBI-Level presidential visit background check, and not a “hey i read some text messages and called a few friends, they say he’s A-OK” investigation. i hope the girl sues baylor for millions. because of baylor’s sheer obama-level incompetence they let loose a predator to prey on any and all women he wanted and then when she had the gall, the temerity, to report a rape they LOWERED HER SCHOLARSHIP!!!!!! go sic ’em girl!

      • Sky Mirror

        Those ” hit pieces on Baylor” were justified. They were nothing but the truth.

    • I’m not picking the piece apart for impartiality, but rather for lack of clarity as to what should have happened, since they seem to think both Baylor and Waco PD did things wrong but don’t specify a different approach, and for hypocrisy in picking on the Waco media for something this very publication did as well, which was to avoid reporting on this for over a year.

      In what way did Waco PD shirk its responsibilities here? Well, if I was a reporter, that’s probably job No. 1 to find that out. And that’s, by the bye, the lede of the piece, which should have been less fluffy and provided at least as much context about the relationship as the Trib did here: http://www.wacotrib.com/news/courts_and_trials/ex-baylor-student-testifies-football-player-assaulted-her/article_ea539beb-8160-52c2-bdf9-08483ee19c67.html

      In what way did Baylor shirk its responsibilities here? Possibly by bringing him onto the team in the first place, but after that, the article seems unclear. I’ve just reread the piece. Finding guilt isn’t Baylor’s job, here: it’s Waco PD’s job, and they’ve apparently done it. Great! If he’s guilty, he should go to jail – and, by the way, that’s exactly what’s happening. This is the system working.

      The only things that Baylor could have done differently here, from the notes in the article about Baylor’s response are: 1) not bringing him onto the team to begin with. 2) After the incident, rearranging their schedules (which, BTW, might be just as harmful to the victim, since now everyone in all of her classes would likely find out about this). 3) Doing the policing themselves.

      I’m a fan of the police doing the police work, the football coaches coaching, and if a person commits a crime, that person going to jail. That will probably happen here, and good for them.

      But what was Baylor supposed to do? Not let him play? He was already not playing. What would you have liked to see happen?

      • Frank Thomanisky

        I think the issue was that no one within the athletic department or school wanted to acknowledge that there was a serious allegation against the player. As the article mentions, “violation of team rules” and “going through some stuff” avoids dealing with the seriousness of the allegation.

        Additionally, the article mentions that it seems clear that the WacoPD didn’t exactly conduct a thorough investigation to start with, and also points out that the school’s investigation relied primarily on a fellow athlete that went to great lengths to not testify under oath. I’d say the lack of an in depth investigation was a serious issue from the school.

        • WJ

          But I think this highlights something that isn’t unique to Baylor: Are universities the proper place to conduct a sexual assault investigation? Across the country, there are plenty of examples that suggest university administrators are incapable of properly investigating such claims, ensuring due process for the accused, avoiding the appearance of impropriety when an athlete is involved, and protecting the accuser. Baylor appears to be no different, but that is not a problem exclusive to Baylor.

        • Lack of a thorough investigation by Waco PD is the most serious thing this article pointed out, and Texas Monthly got virtually no information about why the investigation was halted (hint: this should have been the lede). But this points to a problem (maybe) with Waco PD and not with the school. Police do this stuff professionally. We don’t seriously believe that schools are capable of doing serious criminal investigations, do we?

        • Chris Johnson

          I disagree with the assertion that no one within the athletic department wanted to acknowledge the seriousness of the allegation. He was suspended and not allowed to play because of the allegation. And as far as public quotes go (“going through some stuff”) what is Baylor supposed to say that doesn’t libel the player (if untrue) or hurt the victim?

          • utep2step

            What?! They wanted to get him on the field as soon as possible and keep it under raps. In trying to do so, it blew up in their face. What does the sexual assault victim get? A reduction in scholarship and hopes that she will go away. Briles is filth. I’ve been following this scum bag since his days at Houston. He would cheat during the football games just to get an upper hand during the game. Finally the CUSA coaches, at that time, had enough and called him out on it. Coaches and players do all sort of little tricks and cheats, but Briles was so bad the CUSA coaches said no more!

      • bigyaz

        How about the fact that Baylor attempted to cover the whole thing up, talking vaguely about “team rules” rather than honestly saying he was facing felony charges? Yeah, there’s something this holier-than-thou school could have done differently.

        • Because the publicity benefits no one, least of all the girl. If Baylor said that, every one of her friends, acquaintances and professors would have immediately known about it. You think that’s what she would have wanted?

          • bigyaz

            Yeah, that’s why they covered it up. Not because it would hurt the school or the program. Right. Keep convincing yourself of that; you’re not convincing anyone else.

      • Mr Mojo Risin

        Should have alerted every woman in town so they knew to avoid him so they did not get raped too.

      • Serena Smith

        “What would you have liked to see happen?” That when Baylor investigated the incident they actually found that he was a danger. The assistant coach not publicly backing his behavior by saying he was expected to play in 2015. Him NOT having a degree from Baylor due to suspension from the school…..how’s that for a start?

    • Ben Johnson

      Troll fail

      • Bryan Duncan

        Haha! Coming from someone who has “trolled” 7 commentors on this article alone… You are a troll, I on the other hand had to create an account to make my first comment ever on this site just hours ago. Which one of us is the troll?… I’m just commenting on the absurdity of a person shifting blame on a publication that actually is responsible for bringing this to public attention (regardless of timing), rather than focusing on the fact that a school with religious based principles and a student code of ethics doesn’t seem to care about being upfront with a serious issue. If there was nothing to hide, why not disclose the nature of the player’s offense at the very least. Use common sense. You aren’t going to have a smoking gun on whether they intentionally hid this or not, but a logical person can see this for what it is. They withheld the truth when asked about the player. That is a direct indication of their intent. You are entitled to your opinion, but that doesn’t make it any less wrong. Keep trolling though, that’s admirable.

        • Ben Johnson

          ” I on the other hand had to create an account to make my first comment ever on this site just hours ago”

          That is the epitome of troll.

    • Kite23

      Whats immoral, waiting for a trial as our legal system dictates they should? What a shallow partial talking point you wrote.

    • Wesley Trammel

      Spot on. So much for all the bull shit Christianity Baylor wraps itself up in. Christian girls beware. Athletes can rape you and it is your fault.

  • Well researched, but what were you expecting Baylor to do here? Any investigation they could have possibly done, you know, without police, would have been “inadequate.” It’s almost a tautology that without the police, no investigation would be “adequate.”

    What, in addition, should Baylor coaches be saying? Are they even legally allowed to comment to media about something like this? They’ve said the only thing they reasonably can, that they expect to see him back on the field.

    Your reporting on how the police department handled this (suspending the case) is the biggest place someone might have screwed up here. I wish there was detail on that, because the Baylor institutional response and the police department response are what should be looked at here, not various coaches saying that a player will likely continue playing.

    I know the Waco media fell down on the job here, from your perspective. How lucky for you guys that you’re reporters – oh, and that you cover the state where all this was happening? You fell down on the job equally here, from your own perspective; it’s bad form to call someone out when you’re equally culpable, at least without mentioning that fact.

    • WJ

      A key member of a coaching staff of a football program with national title aspirations stating that he expects a player – accused of rape – back on the field is a direct comment to potential jurors about the merits of the case. That’s not what you say. What you do is defer, punt, give a vague answer, or change the subject. You don’t send a signal – even unwittingly – that the alleged victim of a violent crime is not to be believed.

      • halaleezy

        That’s a very good point, but I think it speaks more to what the coaching staff knew/didn’t know, rather than them trying to influence the jury in one way or another. I highly doubt anyone who is on the jury panel in this case was at the fan luncheon at which Bennett made his comments. If a Baylor football fan rabid enough to attend a luncheon outside of Waco on his/her own dime was not screened out by the juror selection process, then that would have been a huge failing on the part of the prosecution. It’s much more likely that the coaching staff didn’t know the extent of the allegations, and took Baylor’s internal investigation to mean that the case was without merit.

        • WJ

          Fair enough. I don’t think Bennett intentionally tried to comment on the case. I’d be more than willing to give him the benefit of the doubt. But the timing of the comment lends itself to legitimate questions about what he knew. By the way, closing arguments just ended and the jury is deliberating right now.

          • halaleezy

            I will say that I do think that Baylor should have done a better job of both A) screening Ukwuachu’s past before admitting him on a football scholarship and, in the absence of being able to do A), B) endeavoring to make sure all the relevant facts were present before they decided the complainant’s case had no merit.

            There was clearly a breakdown somewhere in the process, but I don’t believe it was intentional or as egregious as the article states. This could have just as easily been an encounter between two non-athletes and there could have been the same breakdown, unfortunately.

          • Marilyn Rajaratnam

            As far as Baylor doing a better job of screening his past is concerned, Briles as always been one to give second chances. If in truth, what he did at Boise State was punch a window and not a person, I can see how Briles would have felt the guy should have another chance to play. I didn’t take the time to research all that happened there, nor am I justifying anything. However, as far as this accusation is concerned, yes, he should have been kicked off the team just as quickly as Tevin Elliot was. Even if after this case is over, and he gets off free, I do not see Briles allowing him to play. Not anymore anyway.

          • Ben Johnson

            He’s done regardless.

          • GenX

            He abused his girlfriend, he didn’t just “punch a window”.

          • Ben Johnson

            Any players abused and locked in closets at Tech recently?

        • GenX

          The player that raped the Baylor girl, said the Baylor coaches “knew everything” about the incident in Boise… then the Baylor staff candy coated it (to sell the transfer to the Waco Community) and let a sexual predator loose on the Baylor co-eds because the kid can play football. Those are the facts. Also, Baylor had a similar incident in 2013. Baylor learns nothing, and does not change it’s actions on it’s own.

          • Chris Johnson

            So, you are relying on the testimony of the player that coaches “knew everything” and then calling the same guy a sexual predator. Are you really trusting a sexual predator to tell the truth? You can’t have it both ways.

            Baylor brought in a player that was involved in an investigation but had no criminal record. He completed anger management classes which are intended to restore people and help them deal with their issues. Heck, the head coach of his old school was expecting him to be back on his team. Doesn’t seem like Boise State would expect him back on campus and then warn Baylor about something bad.

            Tevin Elliot also had no criminal record prior to 2013. Are you expecting coaches to not recruit people because they “might” commit crimes with no prior convictions of anything?

          • GenX

            Look Chris, I realize your a Baylor fan and all, but look at the history of Art Briles’ recruiting record. He puts people at risk time and time again. He is a win at all costs kind of guy, and one day your University will pay for his transgressions:

            Mike Orakpo, LB – Orakpo was recruited to Baylor after being expelled from Colorado State University following an arrest for a “savage beating” that injured four people, two of them seriously, and led to a drug probe when police found evidence of drugs and anabolic steroid at his residence. According to a 90-page police report, a search of Orakpo’s and another expelled CSU’s residence yielded foil packages marked as anabolic steroids, as well as hypodermic needles, nine unmarked vials, eight of them refrigerated, and three used syringes. Possession of anabolic steroids is a felony in Colorado (but apparently not in Waco). With full knowledge of Orakpo’s issues, Briles welcomed him to Baylor.

            http://www.cbssports…chance-allstars

            Tevin Elliot, DE – Baylor player recruited by Briles who was sentenced to twenty years in prison and a $10,000 fine after being convicted in January 2014 of raping and sexually assaulting four Baylor women, including a freshman girl twice at a party at a Waco apartment complex. Prosecutor LaBorde called Elliott a violent serial rapist who can’t admit he did anything wrong because he doesn’t think he did anything wrong. Briles called Elliott a sweet young man who was a good football player and deserved a second chance.

            According to an arrest warrant affidavit, one of the victims, who was a freshman student at Baylor University, told officers she went to the party on April 15 at the Aspen Heights apartments at 3344 South 3rd St. and while there, met Elliott. At some point, Elliott asked her to go outside with him and although she said she didn’t want to go, she told officers he was persistent, the affidavit said. As they went outside, the affidavit said, Elliott “picked up the victim and took her to the pool area and volleyball court area where she was sexually assaulted twice” telling Elliott on several occasions “she did not want this.” The victim later returned to the party and told an unidentified witness about the attack. That person took her to Hillcrest Baptist Medical Center, the affidavit said, and police were called a short time later.

            http://www.wacotrib….9fe39a7d5e.html

            Josh Gordon, WR – arrested by police after being found stoned and asleep in the Taco Bell drive-thru at 3:30 am on Wed night prior to game with Tech. Briles played Gordon against Tech (but held him out of warm ups and Baylor’s first drive as punishment) and said he was sticking by him because he was his kind of player. Gordon eventually left the Baylor program because of his third arrest for drugs in Waco, transferred to Utah where he never played because of failing another drug test and ended up at San Diego State. However, Baylor claims Gordon as one of the players it has put in the NFL. Gordon was suspended from the Cleveland Browns for a year for failing yet another drug test.

            Daryl Stonum, WR – kicked out of Michigan following his third run-in with the law in three years at Michigan. When dismissed, Stonum was just coming off a season-long suspension in response to his second DUI arrest. Briles welcomed Stonum to Baylor’s progam and campus.

            Lache Seastrunk, RB – Recruited to Baylor under questionable circumstances after initially signing with Oregon after street-agent Willie Lyles was found to have accepted a $25K payment for delivering the recruit and leaving Oregon under investigation by a toothless NCAA.

            Shawn Oakman, DE – Recruited to Baylor after kicked out of Penn State’s football program (and they put up with a lot at PSU) for theft.

            Sam Ukwuachu, DE – Recruited to Baylor after being kicked out of Boise State following an arrest and an unspecified violation of team rules. Ukwuachu started in 12 games for Boise State as a freshman and was named a freshman All-American; however, he is no longer welcome at Boise State. Briles welcomed Ukwuachu to Baylor’s football program and campus.

            Ahmad Dixon, DB – Dixon was represented by a street agent during his recruitment and surprisingly decommitted from Texas to sign with Baylor, the first 4-star player to sign with Baylor during their streak of winless seasons. Dixon was arrested for criminal assault last last September during the season. According to the Waco Police Department, the 21-year-old male victim arrived at an apartment where Dixon and his friends were playing video games on the night of Sept. 16. Dixon became angry and began to assault the victim, punching him numerous times in his face and head causing pain and injury and a possible concussion. The victim waited until the next day to report the assault after Dixon made threats to the victim and victim‘s family . Waco police arrested Dixon who was subsequently bonded out of McLennan County Jail. Briles continued to play Dixon during every game that season because he was not actually incarcerated at the time of the games.

            http://dfw.cbslocal….ssault-charges/
            Antareis Bryan – Dallas police have arrested a Baylor football player. Antareis Bryan, a Dallas native, has been charged with aggravated robbery. He was booked into the Dallas County jail early Saturday morning on a $25,000 bond. Bryan is a starter who started every game for the Bears during 2009 and 2010.

            Willie Andrews, DB – A Baylor football player was arrested and charged with possession of marijuana with intent to distribute and operating an unregistered motor vehicle. Andrews was seen driving a black Ford Crown Victoria when police received a call that there was possible drug activity in the area. Police found $6,800 in cash and a 1/2 pound of marijuana in Andrews’ unregistered car.Subsequently, Andrews was arrested at his home and charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and unlawful possession of a firearm when police responded to a call that Andrews allegedly pointed a handgun at his girlfriend’s head during an argument. The handgun Andrews allegedly used was found near a dumpster at Andrews apartment complex. Andrews had previously been sentenced to 30 days in jail after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor gun charge. The gun was found in his car by Texas State Troopers during a traffic stop. At the time, Andrews was serving a two year probation.

            Robbie Rhodes, WR – Rhodes was arrested on drug charges and evidence tampering in May 2014. Because Rhodes attempted to hide the drugs after being apprehended, he was also charged with tampering with physical evidence. Briles said the matter would be addressed internally and added that he expected Rhodes, who is a starter, to start every game next fall so long as he is not incarcerated at game time. However, after Briles presented evidence to the McLennan County prosecutor showing that Rhodes had once previously passed a drug test at a prior time in his life, the prosecutor said that he was dropping all charges including the evidence tampering charge due to the fact that Rhodes was too important to Waco and to Baylor’s football program. Rhodes was a four-star member of BU’s 2013 recruiting class, rated as the No. 8 wide receiver in the country and the No. 8 player in the talent-rich state of Texas at any position. With the legal path now cleared, Rhodes is expected to be a significant contributor to Baylor’s high-octane offense in 2014.

            http://www.cbssports…-on-drug-charge.

            June 2014 Update: Unable to subsist for three weeks without narcotics, Rhodes fails yet another drug test only days after getting his May drug charges dropped and is released from the team, which raises even more questions. First, how many drug tests do you have to fail to get kicked out of Baylor? Hundreds? It should be noted that Rhodes never even passed out in the Taco Bell drive-thru, so why was he kicked off the team? But the biggest question is: knowing that when player-criminals from Michigan, Penn State, Oregon, Colorado State, Boise State, Huntsville, etc, are booted out of school they transfer to Baylor, where is it that player-criminals from Baylor transfer to? Guantanamo?

            Cordell Dorsey, Safety – An Abilene Cooper football standout who has committed to play for Baylor University was arrested Wednesday for alleged aggravated sexual assault of a child. In addition to his arrest, 18-year-old Cordell Dashun Dorsey has been suspended from Cooper’s football team “indefinitely,” Abilene ISD Superintendent Heath Burns said in a written statement. Cordell Dorsey has a verbal commitment to Baylor University and was recruited by Baylor Head Coach Art Briles.

            Also Briles turned to a known pedophile that owns a Baylor sports shop in Stephenville who happened to be J. Stidhams handler. He was fired from high school coaching because he kept having sex with high school girls. This man was on Art Briles’ staff at Stephenville and J. Stidham lived with him @ the time of his recruitment to Baylor.

            Go BEARS!

          • Chris Johnson

            Wow, that’s ALOT of research for an unbiased observer. Taking the time you have taken to address this issue makes it look like you have a serious ax to grind.

            Well, since you are clearly not an unbiased observer and I am not an unbiased observer, let’s find some unbiased information that will help us both.

            You can probably agree that every community of people has bad apples that do drugs, commit violent acts, etc. Unfortunately, this stuff happens at every university and Baylor is not immune to the world’s problems.

            So, then the question becomes, does Art Briles have a program that stands out from other universities in this regard? And the answer is unquestionably – No.

            Art Briles’ Baylor program has far fewer incidents than its peers. For sure, stuff happens, but not at the rate of its peers.

            You have probably seen the Top 25 schools by arrests. Baylor is not on the list. http://www.foxsports.com/college-football/outkick-the-coverage/the-most-arrested-college-football-teams-in-america-081815

            I’m sure because of your unbiased concern, you are doing research and making ugly comments against schools near the top of the list: TCU, Texas A&M, Oklahoma, Ohio State, pretty much every SEC school, Washington State, , , etc. You have to work your way a long long way down the list until you hit Baylor.

            I don’t know the background on all of the players you listed but I will hit the ones I know off the top of my head:

            – Mike Orakpo – Briles agreed to the transfer in June. Heard about the problems at CSU over the summer and promptly disinvited Orakpo. He never stepped foot on Baylor’s campus and instead transferred to play for TCU’s second favorite coach, Dennis Franchione at Texas State. I’m sure you would agree this was the right plan of action.

            – Shawn Oakman stole a sandwich and when a cafeteria employee tried to grab his ID, he grabbed her hand. Period. No bruise, no pain, no problem. He just scared her. Get over yourself with the PSU love. It’s undeserved. At the time, PSU had a zero tolerance policy and stealing a sandwich exceeded zero tolerance. I’m sure you would agree that stealing a sandwich does not indicate a future violent criminal.

            – Tevin Elliot had no prior arrests or issues. Are college coaches not supposed to recruit someone because they “might” be a problem? Are you suggesting we convict kids before they commit a crime?

            – Lache Seastrunk was 3rd on the roster at Oregon and impatient. He also wanted to be closer to a sick grandmother who raised him that lived 20 miles from Baylor’s campus. If you are buying into the “murky circumstances” with zero proof of anything, I think you have now self-discovered you have a deep personal bias against Art Briles and are incapable of evaluating the man in truth.

            – Robbie Rhodes – Robbie was suspended from the team after the first arrest and kicked off the team after the second arrest. I’m sure you would agree that smoking pot is not the gravest offense in the world. If so, stay off the Colorado slopes.

            – Josh Gordon – Kicked off the team after his second arrest for pot….which is legal in several states.

            – Sam Ukwuachu – If you have been following the story through the weekend and have an unbiased outlook, you can see the story on Art Briles has turned 180 degrees and there is a step by step timeline showing that he would not have known about Sam’s violent past and that Chris Petersen (who left Boise State on football probation) and his statement was a giant legal loophole written by attorneys and only approved by Petersen. The loophole of course is that Petersen’s statement never states that Petersen told Briles about SU’s violent behavior. It just leaves it to your imagination….which you have nicely filled in. The roaming email documenting the incident was from a Boise State employee to himself. It was never made public. No one knew if Petersen even knew the details, for some reason (lawsuit protection) he’s not talking.

            Heck, the coach himself was expecting SU back on the team (doesn’t sound like a guy that was worried about SU’s violence) and then called Baylor to recommend SU. SU’s high school coach confirmed that he received the exact same feedback on SU from Petersen as Coach Briles has stated. When the weight of evidence is shown, a person looks like a moron thinking Briles would have known about SU’s violent past.

            I think I’m about done. If you are still convinced Art Briles is an evil guy, then there is no helping you. Good luck in life.

      • Fair point. But the alternative is also a signal, and giving no answers or vague ones or changing the subject for a year on a supposed star athlete who’s incoming is just as much a signal, just in the other direction. Perhaps a statement saying “there’s a trial happening after a while for an issue with this player, and I’ll comment on him again once that’s finished” would have worked, but that makes it a much bigger story (and could also be viewed as a signal).

  • GoBears

    Screw you Texas Monthly

    • Pip

      Nice one einstein.

    • JKC

      Real mature comment in story concerning a rape CONVICTION.

      Keep it classy bears

      • JDA

        Atta boy GoBears, embarrass yourself and your pathetic school.

    • Disgusted

      Seems to be the standard Baylor response. Don’t want to have sex with me, well screw you. Don’t like our star recruit, well screw you. Write an article we don’t like, well screw you. Welcome to Waco.

  • Randy Flinchum

    How many more women does this guy have to attack before you guys think justice should be served? Just another of example of the willingness to take on a criminal with a record because he can rush the passer and bring glory to your school (see Florida State for further help in handling this). Art Briles and the Baylor Administration and the Waco Police Dept. should be ashamed of themselves. This girl deserves an apology for the way she was treated. Wauchuwu is the person who should have been forced to leave Baylor.

    • Well, he’s attacked one so far, if the allegations are true (the Boise State stuff alleges that he put a fist through a window, not through a person), and if it’s true he assaulted her, he should go to jail. There’s a procedure we typically use before that happens, though, called a trial, and I think that’s happening now.

      • GenX

        his violence against women goes back to high school.

        • Good of you to make that up.

          • GenX

            Google is your friend

    • ♛OG D.C.♛

      Florida State handled everything by the book. You will realize that when they are absolved of the title IX allegations. Kinsman has done nothing but lie, change her story and go after money. This Baylor case is some real bad stuff tho.

      • Sky Mirror

        The way that Fla State, the local police and DA handled that case was a disgrace to the school, the town and the state of Fla. And it appears that Waco and Baylor are all too willing to fall into the same sleazebag territory. In Baylor’s case, it is a disgrace to the school, the town, the State of Texas and to the Baptist church. What a bunch of hollow hypocrites. And if Ken Starr was ready to prosecute a president for participating in a consensual sexual act, lets see how he feels about rape.

    • Chris Johnson

      He should not be attacking any women. He has never played a down for Baylor and pending the outcome of the trial, may never play. Randy, why do you think he has attacked other women? He did not have a criminal record. And the Boise State didn’t think he was violent. Boise’s Coach Peterson stated he thought Ukwuachu would be back on his team.

      • GenX

        Boise State knew he was violent… what the hell are you talking about?

        • dave in texas

          Exactly. He was a freshman All American fer cryin’ out loud and still got kicked off the Boise State team. And the Boise State coach isn’t getting enough credit for recognizing the problem and properly dealing with it by cutting the guy loose.

          • Chris Johnson

            The Boise State head coach was expecting him to be back on his team after he completed his anger management classes. He was surprised when SU transferred. Not sure Peterson should get credit for “recognizing a problem” and then expecting to bring it back on the team.

        • Ben Johnson

          Boise State cleared him to return and stated he has no disciplinary record.

          so what the hell are you talking about?

          https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CNCMOD_UcAAyu1e.jpg

  • ♛OG D.C.♛

    Meanwhile in Tallahassee, FSU is being sued by a cleat chasing, money grabbing liar and the media has been all over it for years. Apparently sexual assault only receives attention at schools that mess with the National media’s money. I rarely see anything about other schools on this subject matter. I’ve seen a few from Tennessee, UF and Vandy but not much else and not on national news when this is happening all over the nation in different sports at different schools.

    • Disgusted

      Explain to me how you can say, “I rarely see anything about other schools on this subject matter.” And then follow that up with, “…when this is happening all over the nation in different sports at different schools.” If you rarely hear about it, how do you seem to know it is happening everywhere?

  • John Jakubik

    Well Baylor had a basketball coach try to cover up a murder of one of his players by another, why does this story of coaches trying to cover up a rape not surprise me at all?

    • jbprice

      Really? You’re gonna go there John? You’re going to bring up a basketball coach who is no longer at the school and hasn’t been at the school involving an incident that occurred over 10 years ago on a campus that had a different president. Let’s not forget, the subject “Baylor University Football Player” has never played a down of BU Football in his life.

      • oddibe

        Sam U was brought to campus and given a free education by Baylor University Football because he had the potential to be a superior football player.

        • halaleezy

          And that potential went unfulfilled because of his own stupid decisions. I fail to see how Baylor benefited in any way from this. If he was playing the entire time, as Jameis Winston did, then I can see where the outrage would come from and it would be well justified. As it is, he never even practiced with the team, much less suited up for a game. I know it’s the internet and we’re supposed to express our righteous indignation over everything, but Baylor football handled this about as well as they could. Baylor University, particularly the investigative portion of the administration, did not. There will be a price to pay, and rightfully so.

          • oddibe

            Kind of like a securities call option, Sam’s potential held value for BU’s football program. BU’s AD paid for it in tuition, and BU’s students paid for it in exposure to physical risk. I guess since the option ended out of the money, there’s nothing to see here. Go Bears Football!

          • Independent Texan

            Very good analogy.

      • GenX

        There is this thing called lack of institutional control… you know when a university keeps “not controlling” player on player murder and rape… over and over again year after year.

      • Sky Mirror

        It is a systemic problem that apparently has not been addressed

    • Ben Johnson

      He isn’t on the team. So what were you saying?

    • Andrew D. Crews

      Don’t go full Aggie, John. Never go full Aggie.

    • Chris Johnson

      Are you suggesting the Baylor administration has a culture of coverups? Remember that Baylor fired the coach when they found out what was happening and then self-reported NCAA violations.

      • GenX

        Yes. Yes they do. They also have a history of downplaying Baylor football players raping co-eds as recently as 2013. Waco stinks, one day it will catch-up to them, just like SMU.

        • dave in texas

          You’d think the university’s president, Kenneth Starr, who chased Bill Clinton through the legal system for years (at a cost of tens of millions of taxpayer dollars) over consensual sexual activities would be more responsive to accusations of sexual assault.

          • GenX

            yeah, you would. these are actual convicted felony rapists and not mere accusations to top it off.

        • Chris Johnson

          How did they downplay another rapist? By not publicly commenting on it? Why would they? Tevin Elliot was kicked of the team and out of school. What more is Baylor supposed to do?

          • Sky Mirror

            Fix the problem..Stop giving scholarships to known sexual predators. How much more simple could it be?

          • GenX

            They downplayed it by letting a man indited by a grand jury for rape kick it on campus for over a year in the hopes he could suit up.

  • Ben Johnson

    He is not on the roster and has never played a down for the school.

    • srobertson

      They were prepared for him to play this year had he been found not guilty. Did you not read the article? He graduated from the school. On full scholarship. Good Lord.

      • Daniel Youngblood

        And if he had been found not guilty in a court of law, which he obviously was not, how would that have been wrong? We’re now punishing folks simply for being accused?

        Sexual assault is a heinous crime, and those convicted (like this guy) should rot in prison for whatever the maximum sentence allows. But if we’re going to pretend the presumption of innocence exists in this country, we can’t roast the Baylor football program for its handling of this situation. They shouldn’t have referred to his indictment as “an issue he’s working through” or talked about him like a future contributor. But actions speak louder than words, and Ukwuachu never played a down for the team and was removed as soon as he was indicted.

        • Sky Mirror

          If the trial had been delayed until February, he would have played. See Fla State

      • Ben Johnson

        “They were prepared for him to play this year had he been found not guilty.”

        So if he was found not guilty, they should have kept him suspended? Do you know how stupid that sounds?

    • Independent Texan

      Ben, the issue isn’t whether he was on the roster or played. The issue — the reason an 18 year old virgin was raped — is that he was BROUGHT on that campus to play football, notwithstanding a background that caused Florida to take a pass. You seem to think that the fact he didn’t play a down is the key fact. WRONG! The fact that he was brought there to play is the key fact. That’s what led to this tragedy (you can call it “unfortunate”, but it’s a tragedy). When is someone at Baylor going to APOLOGIZE for the damage that was done to this innocent girl?

      • Ben Johnson

        “is that he was BROUGHT on that campus to play football”

        He didn’t have a criminal record and he had no discipline record at Boise. There is no way a school can predict a students behavior, let alone be responsible for it. Baylor suspended him immediately after he was indicted and he was booted off the roster. Not sure what else is supposed to be done before the legal process takes place.

        Fact is, Ukwuachu is responsible for his behavior, not the school.

      • Ben Johnson

        “The fact that he was brought there to play is the key fact. That’s what led to this tragedy”

        No school can look into the future, but what you are saying is that Baylor should have been able to predict Ukwauchus behavior? Nonsense.

        My cousin was killed by a drunk driver up in Washington. The drunk was a UW student. Should we sue the school for letting a student onto campus that later killed someone? UW should have known better, right? Do you know how ridiculous that sounds?

  • Chris Johnson

    The author notes over and over, as if it is some kind of evidence, that Coach Bennett said Ukwuachu would be playing for Baylor in 2015. But, the author never mentions that Ukwuachu’s old coach at Boise State said the same thing after dismissing him from the team saying “Yeah, he’s just handling some personal stuff,” and then went on to state that Ukwuachu would be back in the Spring or Fall.

    http://www.idahopress.com/blogs/sports/ukwuachu-dismissed-from-boise-state-football-team/article_ebc116fc-b749-11e2-a426-001a4bcf887a.html

    Did Boise State really think (and pass on to Baylor) that Ukwuachu would be violent if their head coach thought he would be back on their own team?

    By the way, the link above took about 20 seconds to find. I’m not sure why they author would deride the Waco press when he/she couldn’t be bothered to spend an extra 20 seconds looking at another side of the story.

    If the author can’t be bothered with another 20 seconds of research, it gives the impression that he/she made up their mind first and then went to look for facts to justify their opinion including sources such as out of context message board references.

    Also, Ukwuachu has never played a down for Baylor and in spite of the author’s assertion that he was a key component of Baylor’s defense, Ukwuachu had no chance of starting and was sitting behind much more talented DE’s including Shawn Oakman and Jamal Palmer.

    • If this is the Chris Johnson who’s Baylor’s third-string quarterback, you probably shouldn’t be commenting here. Otherwise, very well said, and I agree completely.

      • halaleezy

        Haha! Fortunately, both Chris and Johnson are rather common names.

        • I imagine it’s not. I know two other Chris Johnsons, one of whom went to Baylor with me.

      • Chris Johnson

        Not the same. There are so many Chris Johnson’s in the world, I have to check my credit report frequently because of mix ups.

    • jbprice

      I think what we’re seeing here Chris is Baylor having a target painted on its back now that we’ve got one of the most coveted programs in the country. That’s what this really boils down to.

      • GenX

        Baylor’s stadium is 45k… lol “most coveted program in the country”. Not even in Texas.

        • jbprice

          By that logic UofM and Penn State should be the top 2 programs in the country right now. Since when did seat counting equate to a superior program? So let’s get back down to earth shall we? Most schools will build a stadium approx. double the size of their total enrollment. For instance, UofM and Penn State both have stadiums that are just over 100K with a student enrollement of around 50K. Baylor having only about 15K students puts 45K on the high side actually. Furthermore, building an oversized stadium when you play the largest school in the country about an hour south of you would be rather stupid IMO.

          • GenX

            What traditional college football powerhouse would trade everything they have for what Baylor has? ANSWER: NONE. Baylor is not “one of the most coveted programs in the country”. They were an a$$hair away from being left out of re-alignment a few years ago and left out of the power 5 completely. What other football program has had two football players rape 2 different co-eds in less than two years: ANSWER: NONE. Things stink in Waco and have for the past half decade. This is just the latest example. One day it will catch up to them.

            I still can’t believe after a few good seasons Baylor faithful think they are “one of the most coveted football programs in the country”. What a knee slapper. Texas, Texas A&M, TCU and Texas Tech would not trade everything they have for what Baylor has as an overall football program, and that is just in Texas.

          • Chris Johnson

            “What football program has had two football players rape 2 different co-eds in less than two years:” University of Texas, Vanderbilt, Naval Academy, U of Montana, Univ of Oklahoma, Colorado, Nebraska and the list goes on and on.

            Baylor is not even in the top 25 in college programs with numbers of arrests.

          • GenX

            This is the same Baylor that was almost left out of re-alignment and the power 5 a few years ago right? The same Baylor with 2 football players raping 2 different girls in less than 2 years, both players being convicted? Baylor deemed him innocent after their investigation and took away the girl’s scholarship. Thankfully the DA and a jury stood up for the girl.

            FACTS: Texas, Texas A&M, TCU, and Texas Tech would not trade everything their football programs have for what Baylor has. Baylor is far from “one of the most coveted football programs in the country”… they aren’t even coveted in Texas except by the likes of SMU and Houston lol. Sounds like you are the one needing to come back down to earth.

            I mean people second guessing a football program and the coach with 2 convicted rapist in 2 years is something any program should see coming once it happens. Especially since one of the rapist has had a long documented history of violence against women since high school, and Briles welcomed him with open arms and 2nd chances, then later Briles claimed he knew nothing about the kid’s past and was told the kid was just “homesick”. Next, the kid raped an 18 year old virgin while she screamed “NO”, and then the kid informed the girl “this was not rape”. That is disgusting. It has nothing to do with Baylor being good for a few years. It has to do with morals, and right from wrong.

          • jbprice

            You can’t state opinion and label it as a fact. But I guess your perception of reality is the only one that counts and surely no one else’s opinion matters or couldn’t possibly be right unless it aligns with your beliefs?

            It’s likely you represent another Big 12 school or Texas program that has been getting whooped on for the last several years by the Bears and now you’re bent on taking out the pinned up aggression on BU by kicking us while we’re down.

            Keep spreading your vitriol hate.

          • GenX

            Baylor being the envy of any real college football powerhouse is your opinion that is clearly false. Name one powerhouse that would trade Baylor programs straight up…

          • jbprice

            Let me copy and paste my exact words for you: “…we’ve got one of the most coveted programs in the country”. No where did I use the term “real college football powerhouse”, and furthermore I have no idea what the definition is of a “real college football powerhouse”.

            And to refute that we’re not a coveted program is laughable. Instead of bickering with you on a chat board, I’ll let the results on the field speak for itself just like it has for the last two seasons prior and would explain our Top 5 ranking.

    • Ben Johnson

      Why are you trying to use facts around here?

    • Pip

      You’re an embarrassment to your family.

    • Sky Mirror

      Happy to see that you upvote your own comments.

  • Jcp311

    Paging…Paging Texas Monthly, Rolling stone is on the phone for you…

  • Miranda

    Sign my petition to stop funding Baylor as long as they let this jerk stay on their roster: https://www.change.org/p/texas-baptists-needs-to-stop-funding-baylor

    • He’s not on the roster. So, mission accomplished!

    • Ben Johnson

      He isn’t on the roster. But don’t let facts get in the way.
      http://www.baylorbears.com/sports/m-footbl/mtt/bay-m-footbl-mtt.html

      • FullCommunism

        Fighting for victims, real or imagined, and against “rape culture” means never having to say you’re sorry, or check your facts. She honestly just doesn’t care.

        • Miranda

          I’m sorry for saying roster, instead of team or student (he should be expelled for raping another student). Fact: the coach wants him on the roster. Opinion: you’re a fucking asshole who doesn’t seem to care that women are raped and assholes like this football player get away with it. Fact: I don’t give a damn about football, but I do care about human lives and morality. Fact: I was raped and a Baptist church didn’t give a shit. Fact: victims are real.

          • Chris Johnson

            He is not on the roster which means he is not on the team. If he is found guilty then according to Baylor policy, he will be expelled. If for some reason he is found guilty but not expelled, I will be happy to sign your petition and convince others to join as well. As far as your response to FC, what happened to you breaks my heart. I think people who would do something like that are monsters that deserve to be locked away in jail. Rape victims should be listened to and protected. It breaks my heart that a pastor was more concerned about his church than a victim. The best I can do is pray that you will be healed and that you have real counseling that can help.

          • GenX

            but he got some free college from the Baptists.

      • GenX

        facts: 2 Art Briles coached players convicted of co-ed rape in less than 2 years… and Baylor found the guy not guilty during their internal “investigation”.

        • Ben Johnson

          he never played for the school and was found guilty of a crime in a court of law. He is in jail.

          What different outcome would you look for?

    • Kite23

      Baylor is private, the tax payer doesnt fund squat

      • Chris Johnson

        Kite, Miranda is asking that the Texas Baptist Convention drop their funding of Baylor.

    • Jed

      how about we stop funding baylor as long as they are a *private school*?

    • Ben Johnson

      he was never on the roster. Any more brilliant ideas?

  • dfw63

    You can trust justice in McClennan County.
    Just ask the bikers and the Branch Davidians.

    • Andrew D. Crews

      Hardy har har. Branch Davidian jokes are so funny. Idiot.

      • dfw63

        You think incinerating women and children is something to laugh at?
        Maybe your reading comprehension is lacking today.

        • halaleezy

          Pretty sure that was the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, and not McLennan County, but I could be wrong. You are the king of reading comprehension, after all.

          • dfw63

            Looking at some of your other comments in this thread, I’ve amended my response to say that justice in McClennan County seems to swing on a pendulum. Only God knows if it was served today or not, but the women and children at Mt Carmel did not get justice and the Twin Peaks bikers have not yet either.

          • halaleezy

            Well, it’s spelled McLennan, for one. Two, lots of terrible things happen in lots of places that are not terrible. Just because something tragic happened someplace at one point in history does not mean it should be forever defined by it. I fail to see the connection between trusting justice in McLennan county and laughing at the deaths of innocent people.

          • dfw63

            Congrats, you win the spelling bee.

          • Andrew D. Crews

            Is the grand prize that you will stop posting?

          • dfw63

            I will, if you will stop breathing.
            Everyone wins!

          • GenX

            2013 Baylor football player raping a different girl?

        • Andrew D. Crews

          McLennan County had very little to do with that. That was the federal government.
          And my comment was sarcastic. Guess you missed it.

          • dfw63

            /s or /sarc
            Are good ways to close your sarcasm tags.
            But Mt Carmel was Janet Reno running a Clinton operation, but why did that happen and then Twin Peaks happen in McLennan?
            Something is wrong there.

  • Part of the problem is that colleges and universities across the country have a vested interest in downplaying any and all rape allegations. It doesn’t matter if it is the alleged rapist is a member of a football team or a frat boy, or just another guy on campus, rape allegations are bad publicity and bad publicity can lead to lower enrollment which leads to less money.

    This crap have been going on for decades. It was happening when I was in college 30 years ago and we got the same treatment then as now. Shame the victim, sweep it under the rug, and pretend it didn’t happen.

    • Ben Johnson

      “It doesn’t matter if it is the alleged rapist is a member of a football team or a frat boy, or just another guy on campus”

      Rape is terrible. Nearly as many boys/guys are raped as women. For guys, it just goes unreported due to the shame factor.

      • Over 50% of women who are raped do not report it either. Rape is like homicide, but instead of killing the body, the soul is what is mortally wounded. Rape is a crime that leaves ripples of devastation in its wake, from the victim, to the victim’s family & friends, and then the greater community.

        People who have never been sexually assaulted simply do not comprehend the weight and magnitude of shame that one feels as a rape victim. If it is so difficult to report that less than 50% of women can report it, then it is no wonder that the rate of reporting for men who have been assaulted is barely measurable.

  • Ben Johnson

    Baylor has not allowed the guy to play, they’ve not drug the accuser through
    the mud, and they’ve taken an innocent until proven guilty approach to the player . Compare that to Florida State, where Jameis Winston got to
    play every down and win the Heisman while under investigation for rape
    (among other things), Florida State gets a national championship, and
    they attacked the victim ferociously in the media during the process.

    I
    think Baylor has done OK here. If he’s found guilty, he’s
    punished and Baylor hasn’t profited in any way from his being in the
    program, while the victim maintains a degree of anonymity. Not to mention he isn’t on the roster.

  • Clay

    If all true Baylor deserves a big dose of criticism, legal accountability and anything else that comes with that. And Sam U deserves hard time. If not all true Texas Monthly deserves the same as Baylor. I would like to hear the other side to this story which is strangely missing from such a scathing article.

    Keep in mind this kid never played a down at Baylor. Baylor apparently had reason to believe his side of the story. I think they need to explain why.

    • FullCommunism

      For one Waco PD didn’t think there was enough evidence to charge to kid.

      • GenX

        but the DA did… does not compute.

      • Sky Mirror

        Neither did the Tallahassee PD in the Winston case. Of course the chief gets free season tickets.
        The Waco PD didn’t even ask for the rape kit from the hospital. They were part of the cover-up from the beginning.

        • Ben Johnson

          What cover up is needed for a guy who was suspended from the team?

  • oddibe

    Take note parents of prospective female Baylor Bears. Your daughter will assume the risk of exposure to Art Briles’ well-vetted, and in the cases of Sam U. and Oakman, imported prior incident, scholar-athletes.

    • Chris Johnson

      I’m not sure what you are getting at here. Oakman stole a $10 sandwich. Are you concerned that Oakman will steal my daugther’s sandwich?

      • oddibe

        If you truly believe Oakman was booted from Penn State over no more than a $10 sandwich, I don’t think I can help you. Enjoy your Baylor football.

        • halaleezy

          If you have more information, please, feel free to share it.

          • oddibe

            I don’t have anything in my CSI lab to offer. I’m just thinking analytically about Penn State being in critical need of football talent and BU demonstrated rigorous vetting’s efficacy in mitigating risk to the general student population.

          • Chris Johnson

            Penn State had a zero tolerance policy at the time. Oakman stole a sandwich and that went beyond zero tolerance. That’s all there was.

      • GenX

        He assaulted the lunch lady dumbass

        • Chris Johnson

          See, this is what makes you biased. You already have a predetermined conclusion about something and then you build your opinion with false facts to justify a screwed up outlook.

          The “assault” was grabbing a store clerk’s hand to get his ID card back. He didn’t grab it hard enough to bruise or hurt her wrist. He’s just a giant dude and scared the crap out of her. Here’s the story from a Philadelphia CBS source.
          http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2012/07/02/life-after-penn-state-for-shawn-oakman/

          At the time, Penn State was going through the Sandusky scandal and had instituted a zero tolerance policy. Stealing a sandwich and grabbing a wrist were greater than zero. So, he was out.

    • Let’s be fair, Baylor is not the only university to have an issue like this, remember Case McCoy and his troubles in San Antonio? This situation happens at every university in the US. The only unique thing is that the victim was smart enough to go to the hospital and file charges through WPD rather than Baylor’s PD.

      Covering cases like these is tricky for the media, they don’t seem to know where the middle ground is. Either they over report and lose objectivity like in the Rutgers and UVA cases, or they under report erring on the side of being overly cautious as in this one.

      • GenX

        Name another university that has two convicted felony rapists on their football team in the last 2 years… Name another university that had one player murder another in the last decade…

        But man, those Bears can Ball.

        • At the time of my comment, the conviction had not come down from the jury. Most of these cases, by the time they get to the local PD, have had the evidence compromised or disposed of, so that they become a “he said, she said” that are almost impossible to prosecute and get convictions on. University’s in general, should not have police departments – they are beholden to the university, not the students they claim to protect and serve. There are very few exceptions to this rule. This is why you don’t see these cases prosecuted very often; much less have them publicized like this one has been.

          To be honest, I would rather know that there is a convicted rapist who is being watched, than the unknown rapist still victimizing students.

        • Ben Johnson

          “Name another university that has two convicted felony rapists on their football team in the last 2 years”

          Both those guys were immediately suspended when charged. When convicted, they were not on the team.

  • Keep Looking

    Peni Tagive is an Australian that was a former professional rugby player before coming to Baylor. He was
    Ukwuachu’s roommate, but it is probably safe to assume the two aren’t life-long friends. So why would he risk perjury charges or jail time for contempt of court to defend someone who is just his roommate? You think a guy up with this plan all on his own? Would he be deported if he lost his scholarship and therefore student visa?

    From August 2014: http://www.wacotrib.com/sports/baylor/football/drango-unchained-baylor-tackle-on-mission-to-make-up-for/article_bd73a7da-6bcd-56d4-a891-7dac99248414.html

    “Former Australian rugby player Peni Tagive, who played defensive end for Baylor last year, is no longer playing due to health issues. However, he is still with the football program helping out the strength staff while working toward his degree. “He’s a good, mature guy to have around, and everybody respects him,” Baylor coach Art Briles said.”

    Maybe it’s just coincidence that after he spoke to Baylor’s internal investigation he no longer was forced to play football to stay at Baylor, presumably on some sort of scholarship.

    • Sky Mirror

      According to his cell phone records, he lied to the police about his whereabouts during the rape. He might have not wanted to jeopardize his scholarship, especially if he was being pressured.

  • Matthew Harmon

    Good to see Baylor fans on here defending their guy. In Texas football is everything, right?

    • Garrett

      A guy not on the roster, whose playing privilege has been rescinded (as of the day of the indictment), and who’s pending trial?

    • Jay M

      I’m not defending the guy. From the way the trial sounded, he’s guilty and I hope he goes to jail. I’m defending Baylor’s right to not play this out in the media and have it decided in the court instead.

    • Chris Johnson

      Did you miss the part where Baylor fans applauded Baylor for suspending Ukwuachu before the trial? And that he has never played a down for Baylor?

      • GenX

        Did you miss the part where Baylor failed to protect their student body AGAIN, after letting the 2013 Baylor Football Player Rapist loose on the co-eds? Or the part where they took away the girl’s scholly!!! Sick’em.

        • Chris Johnson

          You lack some critical reading and thinking skills. Baylor did not ‘take away’ the girl’s scholarship. She struggled emotionally after the assault and her grades slipped. As a result she lost her scholarship. Baylor absolutely failed her in that they did not support her appropriately; did not provide enough counseling, did not provide enough pastoral care, and did not provide enough grace. Baylor should absolutely be derided for not caring enough for the victim.

          But letting a rapist loose on co-eds? You are one sick guy if you believe anyone is like that just for football. SU was not talented enough to start and had more talented people in the 2 deep.

          GenX, what do you propose Baylor should do in the future? Not let someone play because they “might” be a bad person, even if that person has no convictions and no criminal record?

          • Ben Johnson

            “You lack some critical reading and thinking skills.”

            that is pretty damn funny

  • Liberaltarian

    ” after the school’s investigation (so insufficient, according to the court, that the judge sustained a motion from the prosecution to restrict the defense from referencing it during the trial),”

    Your statement that the judge restricted reference to Baylor’s investigation because it was so insufficient is a factual error that should be corrected. The judge’s decision had nothing to do with the sufficiency of Baylor’s investigation. The judge did not rule, as you wrongly state, that Baylor’s investigation was insufficient in any way. As a matter of law, what someone else decides happened is simply not relevant, regardless of how detailed the investigation is. Deciding what happened is the job of the jury. That’s the reason for the judge’s decision. Your bias is revealed by such a blatantly and factually incorrect statement.

    • Spaghetti Rules

      Well if is Michael Stryker on facebook. Now we know who you are putting your face with you user name.

  • Faylor Baylor. Of course it would be like Baylor to cover this up, but let the kid get caught with weed like Josh Gordon and he would be gone.. Gordon transferred to Utah without a scholarship,where predictably, coach Kyle Whittingham would not put up with dirty drug tests. So Gordon was gone. Art Briles, take note.

    • oddibe

      Kyle Whittingham is a good man.

    • Ben Johnson

      cool story

  • thomas waterdog

    So let me get this correct: people are angry that Baylor let this guy transfer , that something happened, and that the justice system did its job and worked.

    He has never and will never play a down for Baylor. He will be removed from school and spend time in Prison.
    And is not on the Baylor team Roster………………………………….

    • Pip

      I think you may have ‘some issues’, if you can’t see why this is a problem. I guess if reading comprehension was your forte, then you might not have had to go to Baylor.

      • thomas waterdog

        ok, read the clean bill of health given by Boisie state.
        his transfer papers said he was NOT under disciplinary action

        • Ben Johnson

          that would require being able to read. Most on here are still learning to read.

  • Pip

    The poor thing had her V-card pulled by a serial rapist only to be f—-ed by Art Briles, Baylor University, Waco police, and the Waco “media”. Go Bears !

    • halaleezy

      Classy.

    • Chris Johnson

      And what did Baylor do wrong in allowing him to transfer? SU had no criminal record, no convictions of anything, just a police report. Boise State was expecting SU to be back on their football team after he completed anger management classes and their head coach was surprised when he transferred. Clearly Boise State is not going to warn Baylor of something when they were expecting the guy back on their team.

      What SU did is absolutely horrible. And, I’m sorry to say but horrible happens in every large grouping of people. What humans do to each other is absolutely disgraceful.

      But, what should Art Briles and Baylor have done differently?

      • GenX

        The NCAA will let you guys know soon enough

        • Ben Johnson

          cool story

  • Kendall Davis

    If “maintaining a safe and caring community” is so central, then why bring Ukwauchu to campus, knowing his history? Not buying it, Baylor.

  • Pip

    The Baylor statement is amazingly inept. Baylor Law has a portfolio of extraordinarily successful trial lawyers and the best they can come up with is Title IX staffing and compliance arrangements. Are you kidding me ? Go Bears !

  • Planopam

    Excellent detailed write up. The local Waco media still doesn’t seem to get it. The jury verdict of guilty just came in. Guess they saw the truth despite all the stonewalling by the university, police and press. Justice will be served.

    • Ben Johnson

      he was suspended and not allowed to play or practice. She went to the police and they had an investigation. He is now in jail. What else do you want?

  • kd

    just a savage animal that happens to play a game… and Baylor is complicit… disgusting

    • Ben Johnson

      didn’t play a game at baylor

  • Bill

    Baylor->Penn State, Central Texas

    • Ben Johnson

      that’s a brilliant comparison

  • sports_medic

    No word yet if Baylor is going to end their reprisal against the victim and restore the young lady’s scholarship because she had the audacity to not joyfully accept a rape from a member of the Baylor Bears football team.

    • GenX

      Well Baylor has a history of their football players raping girls in 2015 and 2013, why would she go back to Baylor?

    • Ben Johnson

      Rape is terrible and I hope he rots in jail. But he was not a member of the football team.

  • cutedog2

    After reading this article sic’em has turned to sickens. No championship is worth the disclosure of such actions.

    • Ben Johnson

      cool story

  • Rick Sharfman

    Guilty. Art Briles and Baylor are both culpable…they knew the type of individual that they were bringing in…

    • Ben Johnson

      So Baylor should suspect that a kid with no criminal background, who was cleared to return to Boise State per their Deans office, who was recommended by not only his high school coach but Petersen, would commit a horrible crime in the future?

      https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CNCMOD_UcAAyu1e.jpg

  • ActaNonVerba

    Wow baylor WOW! Anything to be good huh? Id be depressed too if i suited scum with a record only for him to commit another crime.
    baylor beat your girlfriend bears

    • Ben Johnson

      Has tech locked any players in closets this year?

      • ActaNonVerba

        Not that I’m aware of. Wait was that a jab? I’d gladly take locking a pansy in a shed over any kind of misconduct like this! Baylor is an example of good players with terrible morals and of a coach that doesn’t care. Must have taken a page out of the Washington DC play book!!! Haha

      • ActaNonVerba

        Has baylor broke any bylaws this year? Douches.

  • Tom Wilson

    To everyone suggesting Baylor was right to let justice take its course: change the word “rape” to “murder,” and then ask yourself if you would feel comfortable having an attempted murderer roaming among your sons and daughters. The University has a duty to protect its students. Based on the medical evidence presented at the hospital, it would seem appropriate to suspend Sam U from campus while the investigation was ongoing. This allows justice to take its course without compromising the safety of the students. Why this is not apparent to all baffles me, unless there are people who truly don’t understand how rape ruins lives. A University must be proactive not reactive to this issue.

    • GenX

      Hasn’t Baylor had a murderer roaming campus? He sure could ball though.

  • Manuel Labor

    Briles was dirty at the high school level. Zebras don’t change their stripes. Phil Bennett apparently didn’t learn anything from Gary Patterson, either.

    • Wack-o

      Yes, let’s drag Gary Patterson into this. That makes sense

      • Manuel Labor

        Bennett wasn’t dishonest when he left TCU. What he should’ve learned from Patterson apparently didn’t stick. Maybe the SMU influence did it. It still comes back to Briles. Remember when cheating was about money? Remember the Pony Express and Kenneth Davis? Now, it’s about keeping the criminals on the field, and out of jail.
        “Waco 911. What is your emergency?”
        “I’m being attacked!”
        “All our units are busy right now. Write down his jersey number and we’ll get back with you.”

    • Ben Johnson

      Patterson recruits known drug users, rapists and kids with assault rap sheets. Not sure that is the example you want to use.

      http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/sports/college/2011-02-24-tcu-lawsuit_N.htm

  • Sean Siberio

    The problem with all the dingbats who keep repeating, ad-nauseum, “innocent till proven guilty” is they fundamentally misunderstand not only our justice system, but the point of internal review systems such as the exceedingly poor one Baylor had. By the logic of these other commentators, no one should ever be held on bail without bond, or held on bail at all, since hey, they are only accused of a crime. Nonsense. Our justice system, based off an initial reading of the evidence, makes a determination very early on as to the risk of the defendant repeating their crimes. It is why people accused of capital crimes are often remanded, have very high bails, and/or must agree to temporary house arrest or wearing of an ankle monitor. I’m sure if an accused killer murdered again while he was out on bail, none of these people would be arguing FOR the bail system.

    As to Baylor’s system of internal review, the allegations are serious and substantial enough (especially when picked up by the DA) to warrant a suspension of the student pending an outcome. Again, in almost any other situation, this is exactly what organizations do. That is why officers are reassigned to desk duty following a shooting, why nurses are removed from their rounds when an allegation of abuse has been made, or a pilot removed if accused of being intoxicated. Again, in all those situations the person is removed prior to guilt being determined. Why? Because the risk is too high to the credibility of the organization, and to the public at large, to allow for someone to continue doing their job under such a serious allegation.

    • Ben Johnson

      fascinating. You know she went to the police right?

  • Timo Clark

    This could be wishful thinking, but maybe the coaches and the university wanted to hold off on releasing information until the player had actually been convicted of a crime. If the school had prematurely released information and then the football player was found NOT guilty. His name, college career and the majority of his life
    would have been ruined. Why does the school have to release information before an individual has been convicted?
    Anytime something is released to the media, it turns into a firestorm and people automatically jump to conclusions. Why does the media think they have a right to receive information that doesn’t concern them, just so they can manipulate the story in favor of their own opinion.

    Maybe the school wanted to save face, but maybe they wanted to protect their student until he had actually been convicted of a crime. Now that the player has been convicted, I think it’s perfectly ok for the school to release information.

  • Super Keith

    Was Ukwuachu a Baylor student at the time of the incident? If so (and it sounds like he was), why was a Title IX investigation not started? Why was he allowed to continue with conditioning, etc.?

  • GO FROGS!

    I would expect nothing less from a Briles led team. I lived in Stephenville during his tenure as high school football coach. Not sure he cares about the law as long as he’s winning.

  • K F

    To me it’s just wrong when college players the likes of OU player Joe Mixon get a slap on the wrist for punching a person so HARD that it KNOCKED HER OUT and BROKE HER FACE, and he is charged with a misdemeanor????? Had that been Public Q Citizen THEY would have been ARRESTED AND CHARGED with felony assault!!! The judge orders that MIXON be suspended from ALL OU sport activities yet Coach STOOPS and OU’s CASTIGLIONE chose to ignore that part of the court order as is obvious by the later recording of an OU sports function! OU may expel racist students but not students that are VIOLENT football players.

  • Brandon Mahan

    W.e’re A. C.riminal O.rganization

  • Tully

    I saw where this guy received his degree from Baylor in May of 2015. That would be about 11 months after he was indicted for sexually assaulting a Baylor student athlete.

    To me this sounds like Art Briles and the Baylor brain trust chose not to pull his football scholarship, even after being indicted.

    • Ben Johnson

      Its obvious Baylor should have done a better job with this. However, he was not on the team and was immediately suspended once the incident was reported. He hasn’t played in two years. He’s now in jail.

  • McCracken10

    I’d like to know when we can expect the esteemed Baylor program to publicly apologize to Coach Chris Petersen for their outright dishonestly while trying to deflect their own shameful actions throughout this incident. We’ll all be waiting Art Briles……

    • nick8345

      It doesn’t look like BSU was honest as they stated Ukwuachu was eligible to play at BSU and was not subject to disciplinary proceedings. http://imgur.com/n3bKPta

    • Ben Johnson

      “Baylor officials released a copy of its transfer information request Friday, which was completed by Boise State director of compliance Jenny Bellomy. On the form, Bellomy indicated that Ukwauachu hadn’t been “suspended or disqualified” from Boise State because of disciplinary issues, and indicated he would have been eligible to return to the Broncos.”

      So Ukwauache wasn’t suspended or disqualified by Boise State and was eligible to return. But then Peterson told Briles about the kids violent history? So either Boise State didn’t care about his violent history, or Peterson is lying. You can’t say that you told another coach of a players violent past when your own school says he was never suspended or disqualified. Pretty sure that closes any arguments in support of Peterson here

  • Agent Michael Scarn

    The school previously tried to cover up the murder of one athlete by another, and then tried to blame it on the victim when discovered. Baylor is fully culpable in once again placing a game above a life.

    • Ben Johnson

      The basketball coach tried to label the deceased kid as a drug dealer, which is terrible. A baylor assistant coach couldn’t believe what he was hearing and reported it. That is not covering up anything. That is a Baylor employee reporting a serious issue.

  • J. Jason Jonas

    I can still remember the fiasco that was Dave Bliss. Now Art Briles? Get in front of it. Be honest. And let Briles go immediately.

    • Ben Johnson

      Critical thinking is not your forte.

  • thomas waterdog

    sadly Briles did not know about any sexual assualt,,,the player never went on the field at baylor…
    was not on this years roster…
    yet people want Briles fired??
    Jamies Winston did what? how many times? and played a whole season?

  • TTU RHIM ’09

    Oh you know for a fact that Briles knew nothing? You mean there aren’t any emails from Petersen to Briles detailing his violent past? Because I’m pretty sure those emails are floating around online. You, my friend, are a little too presumptuous. Check your facts.

  • arlington neiswander

    The really sad thing is this predator only got 6 months in jail plus probation. While the victim lost her $40,000 scholarship and will have PTD for more than 6 months I’m sure. So the justice system did not work. In fact it let every other predator know the worst thing that can happen is a 6 month vacation! You watch I guarantee the NCAA won’t do a thing about this to Baylor but if you had given him $50 bucks they would loose half their schollys and lord knows what else

    • Ben Johnson

      it is quite sad he only received 6 months of jail. I don’t get that at all.

      The NCAA can’t do anything about it because Baylor suspended the player, the player never stepped onto the field.

  • piteus

    Ukwuachu is guilty. End of story. He forcibly raped a girl in his bedroom after texts showed she was not interested, “finishing business.” It only gets worse as Ukwuachu had his roommate lie for him. His roommate was not in the apartment … his cell phone was pinging all over WACO that night.

    The University of Baylor should be ashamed. Their investigation was so insufficient, the judge ordered that there would be no mention of it in his court. Baylor cleared a sociopath so he could play football. They gave him a degree after the sexual assault allegations even though they knew about Ukwuachu’s troubled history at BSU. They reduced the victim’s scholarship while they enrolled a monster at their graduate school (on a full ride). Boise State called Briles a liar. Deam McCaw decided to believe the accuser, his now discredited witness, a biased polygraph, and some texts. McCaw was too lazy to obtain the rape kit, talk to the victim’s psychologist, and call BSU (a history that she probably already knew).

    This is far bigger than Art Briles. Baylor turned their back on a rape victim and tried to exonerate a monster. Shame on Baylor. They have some explaining to do.

    • Ben Johnson

      You have 1 or two facts mixed in with about 8 or 9 pieces of fiction. Don’t confuse the two.

  • Yuri Kurylo

    Baylor is willing to take anyone–rapists, murderers, anyone, AND pay them to come–if they are good at sports. #KenStarrSituationalMorality

    • nick8345

      The stats don’t back up your sweeping assertions. Compare the number of arrests that Baylor football players have had to either UT or A&M or any of the Top 25. Baylor compares very favorably.

    • Ben Johnson

      you aren’t too bright

  • Patrick Division

    “From Baylor’s brief investigation, to its failure to consider disciplinary action… the school’s idea of how to respond to serious rape allegations is seriously out of step with that of the courts.”

    Dude got a sentence of 180 DAYS. Maybe the school’s response wasn’t that different than the court’s, after all. Disgusting.

  • Chance Neel

    Thoroughly researched?!? They quoted an anonymous poster on BaylorFans message board. This piece is wrong on so many levels and poor journalism.

  • Greg Gardner

    Pretty one sided. Leaves out Boise State signed paperwork saying no discipline issues. Doesn’t mention McLennan County had subpoena power and BU didn’t. Leaves Boise State repeatedly offered no comment. And this common sense:

    Peterson version: I called Briles and told him “EVERYTHING.” Ukwuachu is a maniac. He attacked his girlfriend twice, punched out a window, fought with teammates, and broke many team rules. So, Art, do you have a scholarship for him?

    Briles version: Peterson called and said Ukwuachu is basically a good kid. However, he broke up with his girlfriend, is homesick, misses Texas, and is depressed. It just hasn’t worked out at Boise State. So, Art, do you think you might be interested?

    Which sounds more likely if Boise State wants to avoid legal action and find a new place for Ukwuachu?

  • Wesley Trammel

    Very sad to see that Christian morality takes a back seat to sports. Such is Baylor.

    • Ben Johnson

      you are a failure as a troll. But I do like your effort

  • sanford943

    So he was sentenced to ten years of probation, 180 days in jail and community service. Pretty weak sentence.

  • irishbrother

    hedindonuffndoh

  • Ben Johnson

    While it appears that Baylor could have handled the situation better, the article contains so many falsehoods that its hard to take the subjective writing seriously.
    “The reason that Ukwuachu missed the 2014 season”

    Ukwuachu didn’t “miss” the 2014 season. He was suspended and not allowed to play a down for the school or step onto the field pending the outcome of investigation(s). He never played a down and was completely removed from the program.

    “Baylor officials either knew, or should have known, that Ukwuachu had a history of violent incidents at Boise State.”

    False. Boise State’s Office of the Dean stated that Ukwuachue was in good standing with the school.
    Boise states coach, Petersen called Briles and recommended Ukwuache to him.

    “When Briles’ program brought Ukwuachu to Baylor, they did so amid media reports that the player had a disciplinary history that his previous program took seriously enough to kick him off the team”

    This is false. Boise States office of the dean stated “We have no student conduct records for Samuel and he is in good standing with Boise State”.

    “they had every reason to suspect had previously presented a threat to students at another campus”

    False. See above comment.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CNCMOD_UcAAyu1e.jpg

    • Ben Johnson

      With those things said, I feel the sentencing on this guy was too light and I was surprised to see such a light sentence. I hope the victim is able to piece things back together and find happiness and fulfillment now and in the future.

  • Joe

    Great article. Absolutely sickening what’s going on at baylor and then using my religion as the scape goat. It disgusts me that some people still take baylors side in this even after the kid was convicted of rape. Baylor is not a Christian university.

    • Ben Johnson

      The article is littered with falsehoods. The student had no criminal record, Petersen recommended him to Briles and he was cleared to return to Boise State. Baylor took a chance and suspended him once he was charged/indicted. It is terrible what happened to the girl, no doubt. But what happened to accountability? The problem is Ukwuachu, not Briles or Baylor.

      • Independent Texan

        “Unfortunate”? Is that what you call it, Ben? Is that what you would call it if it had been your virgin 18 year old daughter that he raped?

        Unfortunate is when you are struck by lightning. What happened here is willful negligence in allowing a monster to remain on your campus, while running off the victim who had the courage to report that she had been raped by a varsity football player.

        • Ben Johnson

          He wasn’t on the team, how is he a varsity football player?
          And if he was a monster, why didn’t Boise State say or do anything about it?

          • Ben Johnson

            It’s hard to reply when someone calls out your bs, isn’t it?

  • davids

    So many comments…. sorry if I am repeating. I am truly only concerned with how this was handled and discussed from Oct. 13 to this past week. The transfer does not make Baylor less guilty. To save face, I think Ken Starr needs to release or reassign Bethany McCraw that investigated for the university. I don’t know if anyone will force continued investigation to see if and what McCraw may have shared with Briles or Starr. This could be the response by Baylor.

  • GenX

    Mike Orakpo, LB – Orakpo was recruited to Baylor after being expelled from Colorado State University following an arrest for a “savage beating” that injured four people, two of them seriously, and led to a drug probe when police found evidence of drugs and anabolic steroid at his residence. According to a 90-page police report, a search of Orakpo’s and another expelled CSU’s residence yielded foil packages marked as anabolic steroids, as well as hypodermic needles, nine unmarked vials, eight of them refrigerated, and three used syringes. Possession of anabolic steroids is a felony in Colorado (but apparently not in Waco). With full knowledge of Orakpo’s issues, Briles welcomed him to Baylor.

    http://www.cbssports…chance-allstars

    Tevin Elliot, DE – Baylor player recruited by Briles who was sentenced to twenty years in prison and a $10,000 fine after being convicted in January 2014 of raping and sexually assaulting four Baylor women, including a freshman girl twice at a party at a Waco apartment complex. Prosecutor LaBorde called Elliott a violent serial rapist who can’t admit he did anything wrong because he doesn’t think he did anything wrong. Briles called Elliott a sweet young man who was a good football player and deserved a second chance.

    According to an arrest warrant affidavit, one of the victims, who was a freshman student at Baylor University, told officers she went to the party on April 15 at the Aspen Heights apartments at 3344 South 3rd St. and while there, met Elliott. At some point, Elliott asked her to go outside with him and although she said she didn’t want to go, she told officers he was persistent, the affidavit said. As they went outside, the affidavit said, Elliott “picked up the victim and took her to the pool area and volleyball court area where she was sexually assaulted twice” telling Elliott on several occasions “she did not want this.” The victim later returned to the party and told an unidentified witness about the attack. That person took her to Hillcrest Baptist Medical Center, the affidavit said, and police were called a short time later.

    http://www.wacotrib….9fe39a7d5e.html

    Josh Gordon, WR – arrested by police after being found stoned and asleep in the Taco Bell drive-thru at 3:30 am on Wed night prior to game with Tech. Briles played Gordon against Tech (but held him out of warm ups and Baylor’s first drive as punishment) and said he was sticking by him because he was his kind of player. Gordon eventually left the Baylor program because of his third arrest for drugs in Waco, transferred to Utah where he never played because of failing another drug test and ended up at San Diego State. However, Baylor claims Gordon as one of the players it has put in the NFL. Gordon was suspended from the Cleveland Browns for a year for failing yet another drug test.

    Daryl Stonum, WR – kicked out of Michigan following his third run-in with the law in three years at Michigan. When dismissed, Stonum was just coming off a season-long suspension in response to his second DUI arrest. Briles welcomed Stonum to Baylor’s progam and campus.

    Lache Seastrunk, RB – Recruited to Baylor under questionable circumstances after initially signing with Oregon after street-agent Willie Lyles was found to have accepted a $25K payment for delivering the recruit and leaving Oregon under investigation by a toothless NCAA.

    Shawn Oakman, DE – Recruited to Baylor after kicked out of Penn State’s football program (and they put up with a lot at PSU) for theft.

    Sam Ukwuachu, DE – Recruited to Baylor after being kicked out of Boise State following an arrest and an unspecified violation of team rules. Ukwuachu started in 12 games for Boise State as a freshman and was named a freshman All-American; however, he is no longer welcome at Boise State. Briles welcomed Ukwuachu to Baylor’s football program and campus.

    Ahmad Dixon, DB – Dixon was represented by a street agent during his recruitment and surprisingly decommitted from Texas to sign with Baylor, the first 4-star player to sign with Baylor during their streak of winless seasons. Dixon was arrested for criminal assault last last September during the season. According to the Waco Police Department, the 21-year-old male victim arrived at an apartment where Dixon and his friends were playing video games on the night of Sept. 16. Dixon became angry and began to assault the victim, punching him numerous times in his face and head causing pain and injury and a possible concussion. The victim waited until the next day to report the assault after Dixon made threats to the victim and victim‘s family . Waco police arrested Dixon who was subsequently bonded out of McLennan County Jail. Briles continued to play Dixon during every game that season because he was not actually incarcerated at the time of the games.

    http://dfw.cbslocal….ssault-charges/
    Antareis Bryan – Dallas police have arrested a Baylor football player. Antareis Bryan, a Dallas native, has been charged with aggravated robbery. He was booked into the Dallas County jail early Saturday morning on a $25,000 bond. Bryan is a starter who started every game for the Bears during 2009 and 2010.

    Willie Andrews, DB – A Baylor football player was arrested and charged with possession of marijuana with intent to distribute and operating an unregistered motor vehicle. Andrews was seen driving a black Ford Crown Victoria when police received a call that there was possible drug activity in the area. Police found $6,800 in cash and a 1/2 pound of marijuana in Andrews’ unregistered car.Subsequently, Andrews was arrested at his home and charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and unlawful possession of a firearm when police responded to a call that Andrews allegedly pointed a handgun at his girlfriend’s head during an argument. The handgun Andrews allegedly used was found near a dumpster at Andrews apartment complex. Andrews had previously been sentenced to 30 days in jail after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor gun charge. The gun was found in his car by Texas State Troopers during a traffic stop. At the time, Andrews was serving a two year probation.

    Robbie Rhodes, WR – Rhodes was arrested on drug charges and evidence tampering in May 2014. Because Rhodes attempted to hide the drugs after being apprehended, he was also charged with tampering with physical evidence. Briles said the matter would be addressed internally and added that he expected Rhodes, who is a starter, to start every game next fall so long as he is not incarcerated at game time. However, after Briles presented evidence to the McLennan County prosecutor showing that Rhodes had once previously passed a drug test at a prior time in his life, the prosecutor said that he was dropping all charges including the evidence tampering charge due to the fact that Rhodes was too important to Waco and to Baylor’s football program. Rhodes was a four-star member of BU’s 2013 recruiting class, rated as the No. 8 wide receiver in the country and the No. 8 player in the talent-rich state of Texas at any position. With the legal path now cleared, Rhodes is expected to be a significant contributor to Baylor’s high-octane offense in 2014.

    http://www.cbssports…-on-drug-charge.

    June 2014 Update: Unable to subsist for three weeks without narcotics, Rhodes fails yet another drug test only days after getting his May drug charges dropped and is released from the team, which raises even more questions. First, how many drug tests do you have to fail to get kicked out of Baylor? Hundreds? It should be noted that Rhodes never even passed out in the Taco Bell drive-thru, so why was he kicked off the team? But the biggest question is: knowing that when player-criminals from Michigan, Penn State, Oregon, Colorado State, Boise State, Huntsville, etc, are booted out of school they transfer to Baylor, where is it that player-criminals from Baylor transfer to? Guantanamo?

    Cordell Dorsey, Safety – An Abilene Cooper football standout who has committed to play for Baylor University was arrested Wednesday for alleged aggravated sexual assault of a child. In addition to his arrest, 18-year-old Cordell Dashun Dorsey has been suspended from Cooper’s football team “indefinitely,” Abilene ISD Superintendent Heath Burns said in a written statement. Cordell Dorsey has a verbal commitment to Baylor University and was recruited by Baylor Head Coach Art Briles.

    Also Briles turned to a known pedofile that owns a Baylor sports shop in Stephenville who happened to be J. Stidhams handler. He was fired from high school coaching because he kept having sex with high school girls. This man was on Art Briles’ staff at Stephenville and J. Stidham lived with him.

  • Mr Mojo Risin

    This is the definition of Christian in how most Christians live life. Sinful. Ungodly

    • Mr Mojo Risin

      And they’re the only ones not going to hell. – says them and literally no one else in the world.

  • Mr Mojo Risin

    Should have alerted every woman in town so they knew to avoid him so they did not get raped too. Baylor endangered every female living in the region. Shame on them. Who else did he rape?? No telling. Baylor loves having rapists around. Virgin no more, huh baylor. Just sick!

  • SNR

    Texas Monthly school of journalism

    • jbprice

      More like Texas Monthly School of Reality Distortion.

  • SNR

    Pretty interesting stuff coming out today TM. I think these reporters and about five others at ESPN, Yahoo, and CBS should be fired, or sued, for libel.

  • Ben Johnson

    Here are the top 25 FBS schools based on arrests and criminal issues with players over the last 5 years.
    http://collegesports.blog.statesman.com/2015/08/18/a-top-25-ranking-based-on-arrests-_-did-your-team-make-the-list/

    • jbprice

      Go easy on the facts Ben. You’ll scare people.

  • Ricky, Bubbles & Julian

    what seems very clear here is if you’re a female on baylor’s campus, you damn well better have your tuition already figured out. if you’re an athlete on scholarship, and you have the gall to report a sexual assault, you WILL have your scholarship reduced or revoked while the accused (and later convicted) will get to graduate and most likely go to grad school on full scholarship

  • Ricky, Bubbles & Julian

    i mean, what the hell is wrong with these coaches??? i get a second chance if the kid was kicked off for marijuana or cheating on a test or something relatively tame. ANY TIME a man lays hands on a woman (assuming the woman doesn’t literally have a gun to his head) he’s done. no second chances, none. someone who hits women or attacks women deserves no second chances, even if he could guarantee you a national championship. i’d rather work at the local dump than be known as the guy who makes $3M but lets loose sexual predators onto a campus full of young ladies

    • Ben Johnson

      Do you know how to read?

      He was given a second chance after having no history of violence, no arrests and no discipline record at Boise State.

      But nice attempt at some fake phony outrage

      • Ricky, Bubbles & Julian

        a girlfriend coming all the way from boise to testify against him sure seems like a history of violence. maybe i’m wrong, maybe she deserved it because he’s a baylor football player, which is really the most important thing about this sordid story

        • Ben Johnson

          After the fact, yes. Prior to that, he had no criminal or discipline record.

          If he did have a history of violence towards women, Boise State was pretty good about covering it up.

          • Ricky, Bubbles & Julian

            prior to finally being caught in santa monica, whitey bulger didn’t have a bad criminal record. doesn’t mean people didn’t know about it, but choose to look the other way because they were getting something in return

          • Ben Johnson

            Ukwuachu didn’t have a criminal record at all. Boise State said he was eligible to return to school and was in good standing. Boise State’s coach called and recommended him to Baylor. Not sure what Baylor was looking away from.

            And we both know the school didn’t get something in return – he never played a down, nor did he step onto the practice field.

          • Ben Johnson

            It’s obvious that we disagree, which in itself is fine. You have your opinion and I have mine. I just use facts. You use…well who knows what you use.

          • Ricky, Bubbles & Julian

            I just use common sense. Ted bundy didn’t have a criminal record when he was first arrested but it doesn’t mean that he wasn’t a bad guy and that someone should have known

          • Ben Johnson

            Common sense is not a fact, that is a person’s opinion. Intuition is not a fact. No coach or school can know what a student’s future behavior is going to be. You are saying that Baylor should have known Ukwuachu was a bad guy..based on no evidence but your opinion. That lacks logic.

            How about this:

            Joe Mixon: OU. Punched a women, broke 3-4 bones in her face. Sat a year and is now playing again at OU. Why is he on the team?

            He is clearly a bad guy who is going to rape someone on campus, right?

          • Ben Johnson

            Sweet

  • PatrickHenry2016

    I am disgusted to be an alumni. Briles, Bennett, and Bethany McCraw should all be fired immediately. My daughters will not attend a school that condones and protects rapists.

    • Ben Johnson

      cool story bro

  • douglas gray

    According to one district attorney:

    “Sexual assault in the second degree (see Table 1) is a class C felony punishable by a prison term of up to 10 years, a fine of up to $10,000, or both. By law, anyone convicted of this offense must serve a prison term of at least nine months. The court may suspend all or a part of the balance of the sentence. A defendant is usually placed on parole or probation to serve the suspended portion of his sentence. He can be returned to prison if he violates the terms of the placement.”
    He got off with no sentence and 10 years probation? Did that occur because he was a high profile athlete?
    I wonder what would have happened had he been a poor black guy with no athletic skills? I suspect he would have gotten substantial prison time.

    • Ben Johnson

      Jameis Winston is a high profile athlete, one who was allowed to play the entire season after being accused.

      Ukwauchu hadn’t played in two years. He was a bench player at best.

  • Independent Texan

    Well done Texas Monthly. Whether or not Baylor’s higher ups are negligent to the point of deserving to be fired can be debated for awhile. What appears to be beyond debate is that Baylor University, this Christian university, made egregious errors (“things done and things left undone”) and have yet to confess, repent and atone. Jesus’ forgiveness is of course available once those things are done. It kind of blows my mind that Baylor hasn’t yet been able to utter an apology. Oh, and keep in mind that Baylor did everything they could to sweep this under the rug — they cut the girl’s scholarship, effectively running her off as a result while they protected this monster who we now know to be a serial abuser of women. I’d say that something much, much more important than football is at stake here. I wonder if Ken Starr will recognize it and follow God rather than the advice of counsel here.

    • Ben Johnson

      Did it occur to you that her scholarship was reduced because of grades from the previous semester? She was put on probation before the incident.

  • Dante Woods

    As has been clear *since the trial* the violence toward the ex-girlfriend was unknown to Briles until last week, because she never told anyone. So after Texas Monthly prints a follow-up, I’ll be happy to count the hours until every damn one of the commentators (here and in the media) who ignorantly asserted over and over that Baylor and Briles “knowingly brought an abuser” to campus posts an apology and retraction. Again, anyone actually paying attention to the facts has known this for 5 days…and yet all we’ve heard is preening b.s. from self-righteous trolls whose own accusations prove their stupidity. Talk about disrespecting the real victim and crime – the victim only mattered to most of these commentators as ammo against Baylor or Baptists or Christians in general or “college athletics.” Pathetic.

    • jbprice

      Well said Dante.

      I cancelled my subscription to Texas Monthly over this and will never buy another TM magazine.

  • Tully

    In just looking at the fact the defendant was indicted for a second degree felony, it is stunning to see Baylor fans rally behind an in-house sham COC procedure. A proceeding that trail court found to be unreliable.

    When a prosecutor files a case, seeks an indictment, that prosecutor must have a reasonable belief they can prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the accused committed the crime he has been indicted for.

    I have yet to see anything Baylor did right once the defendant was indicted.

    I wonder if the DA’s Office wanted a gag order to try to protect the case from interference by Baylor University?

    • Ben Johnson

      It makes sense that Baylor would try to protect someone that had never played and that was not on the team.

  • Whirlwinder

    Baylor needs to drop the “caring Christian community” act. They have been a secular school for so long that Christianity is not in the mix there. You will find as many socialist professors there as at any other university and the Muslim student association is cow-towed to with vigor.

    • Ben Johnson

      cool story

  • Whirlwinder

    Well, the 21st sentencing day has come and gone. Did he get his 20 years?

  • Ben Johnson

    This is the google avatar of Dan Solomon, the co-writer of this piece. Tells you all you need to know.
    http://i1219.photobucket.com/albums/dd439/schoolbum/avatar%20of%20daniel%20solomon%20TM_zpsvryvmxoy.png

    https://plus.google.com/102867101266845638465/posts

  • Headley Jones

    Not out to defend Baylor, but the authors of this article seem to be missing some very basic ideas related to sexual assaults and criminal justice. First, the victims of sexual assault very often do not want their cases to become high-profile public affairs. This is not for any shadowy nefarious reason – it’s just their preference, and a well established fact. The authors write with approximately zero apparent understanding of this fact. They try to suggest that Baylor is hiding information – when in reality, the victim herself has clearly requested (through the gag order) that her name and case be kept as low-profile as possible. For Baylor, Briles or anyone else to go against her wishes would have been a travesty – a second violation.

    Beyond that, it’s extremely hard to see what Baylor did wrong here. The rapist never played football for Baylor. The sum total of grievance against Baylor seems to be that one of their coaches thought the rapist would play this year. Well, he thought that, but he was wrong. He could have helped himself out by saying nothing about the (then just accused) rapist, sure, but is it a crime for him to be wrong?

    Bottom line: No one protected this kid. Here in America, he was innocent until proven guilty. Now that he’s been found guilty by a jury of his peers, he’s being convicted. And along the way, he never played football for Baylor.

    What else could Baylor have done? They were not, legally or morally, in a position to speak publicly about the nature of the accusations against the player – that would have violated the gag order requested by the prosecutor (no doubt with the victim’s request or consent). The criminal case was filed in court. Was Baylor supposed to put up a billboard telling everyone that this kid was alleged to have committed a crime? That’s ridiculous. People are still innocent until proven guilty in America.

    This witch-hunt to blame Baylor is real nanny-state run amok stuff.

    • Ben Johnson

      Why are you trying to be logical around here? This is vigilante justice at its finest!

  • KristiM

    Demand Resignation of Baylor Coach Art Briles, Dean Bethany McCraw Re: Sexual Assault Cover-up
    Sign Petition: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/673/744/988/demand-resignation-of-baylor-coach-art-briles-dean-bethany-mccraw-re-sexual-assault-cover-up/
    As a graduate of Baylor University, I am deeply ashamed of Baylor’s appalling abdication of responsibility to student safety in the case of sexual assault perpetrated by football player Sam Ukwuachu. (Sam Ukwuachu was convicted of felony sexual assault as of August 20, 2015). Baylor’s woefully inadequate internal investigation into Ukwuachu’s actions, the university’s decision to turn a blind eye, the resulting lack of appropriate disciplinary action, and Ukwuachu’s continued presence on campus (nearly a year after being indicted for sexual assault and two years following the assault) all point to an administrative attitude that values football success over student safety. To add to this, Sam Ukwuachu transferred to Baylor after being dismissed from Boise State’s football team for disciplinary reasons including incidents of violence. It is hard to understand why a private university whose mission statement includes “Christian commitment within a caring community” would unquestioningly welcome a football player who was kicked off another university’s football team for inappropriate and violent behavior. The victim of this sexual assault was victimized not only by her attacker, but by Baylor’s administrative failure to prioritize student safety. Associate Dean/Judicial Officer Bethany McCraw failed in her duty to thoroughly investigate and fully gather evidence in this case. McCraw determined “that there was not enough evidence to move forward” regarding internal disciplinary action although she later admitted that she never reviewed the nurse’s medical report/rape kit (including evidence of vaginal injuries) or Ukwuachu’s prior disciplinary records from Boise State. The response from Coach Art Briles and the Athletic Department has been one of casual indifference at best and complacence at worst. As recent as June 3, 2015, public statements were made by Baylor coaching staff that they expected Ukwuachu to join the team for the upcoming season when they knew he was facing trial for sexual assault in the coming months. I find the comment ( August 6, 2015) by Coach Art Briles regarding this case –“I like the way we’ve handled it as a university, an athletic department, and a football program.” — absolutely morally repugnant. In the Alumni updates I receive from Baylor, there are many references to Baylor’s deep Christian values and education in the context of a caring Christian community. If Baylor intends to live up to these values, the dismissal/ resignation of Art Briles, Bethany McCraw, and others directly responsible is the minimum act of restitution acceptable to restore a sense of dignity and safety to Baylor’s campus.

    Please join me in calling for the resignation of Art Briles, Football Coach, Bethany J. McCraw, Associate Dean for Student Conduct, and others directly responsible………. –From a Deeply Disappointed Member of the Baylor Alumni

    (Facts stated here may be verified by multiple reputable news outlets)

    • Ben Johnson

      Pretending you are a graduate of a school, to slam a school is about as shady as you can get.

  • KristiM

    As a graduate of Baylor University, I am deeply ashamed of Baylor’s appalling abdication of responsibility in responding to this sexual assault in the context of campus safety. The victim of this sexual assault was victimized not only by her attacker, but by Baylor’s adminstrative From Baylor’s woefully inadequate initial investigation, the university’s decision to turn a blind eye, the resulting lack of appropriate disciplinary action, and Sam Ukwuachu’s continued presence on campus (nearly a year after being indicted for sexual assault and two years following the rape) all point to an administrative attitude that values football success over student safety. I find Coach Art Briles comments regarding this case –“I like the way we’ve handled it as a university, an athletic department, and a football program.” — absolutely morally repugnant. In the Alumni updates I receive from Baylor, there are many references to Baylor’s deep Christian values and education in the context of a caring Christian community. If Baylor intends to live up to these values, the dismissal/ forced resignation of Art Briles and others directly involved would be a minimum act of restitution remotely acceptable to restore a sense of dignity and safety to Baylor’s campus.

    • Ben Johnson

      I guess we should believe that you graduated from Baylor, huh?

      Nice try.

  • Ben Johnson
  • Ben Johnson

    Minnesota looks like it has been covering up sexual assaults for a couple of years now and they admit there is a culture of sexual assault at the campus

    http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/13897172/minnesota-golden-gophers-players-accused-sexual-harassment-assault