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Cowgirl Migas

By March 2007Comments

This recipe is one of several included in the Texas Monthly article From Husks Till Dawn by Patricia Sharpe, [March 2007]

3 corn tortillas
6 egg whites plus 2 whole eggs (or 8 eggs)
kosher or sea salt to taste
freshly ground black pepper to taste
hot sauce such as Tabasco or Cholula to taste (optional)
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 small red onion, chopped
2 serrano chiles, seeded and sliced lengthwise, then cut into half-moons
3 plum tomatoes, seeded and diced
1 yellow, orange, or red bell pepper, chopped
1/2 cup fresh nopalitos (optional; see note)
1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro (leaves and tender stems), plus additional sprigs for garnish
2 ounces (about 1/2 cup) finely grated cotija or other aged Mexican cheese (queso añejo)
4 large limes or 8 Mexican limes, cut into wedges
Salsa Verde or Horse Trader Salsa, or both.

Toast tortillas over a gas flame until charred and blistered but not too dark. If you don’t have a gas range, toast them in a dry skillet over medium-high heat. Cool slightly, then tear or coarsely chop into K-inch squares. Combine egg whites and eggs in a small bowl, season with salt, pepper, and hot sauce, and beat lightly with a fork. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat and swirl to coat. Add onion and chiles and sauté until softened, 4 to 5 minutes. Add tomatoes and bell pepper and cook until the tomatoes begin to break down, about 4 minutes. Add tortillas and cook, stirring, until they are moistened and have absorbed any juices. Add eggs and nopalitos and cook, stirring with a rubber spatula. Add chopped cilantro when eggs are still liquid but getting firm. Cook just until eggs are set.

Serve immediately with a dusting of cotija cheese. Put small plates of lime wedges and cilantro sprigs and bowls of Salsa Verde and Horse Trader Salsa on table so guests may add their own. A squeeze of fresh lime juice really brightens the flavor. Serves 4.

Note: If you want a hotter scramble, don’t seed the serrano chiles. Fresh nopalitos can often be found in plastic bags in the produce section of Whole Foods, Central Market, and Fiesta Mart (among others). To prepare, empty the packet into a colander and rinse (the paddles will be coated in a gooey, okralike liquid). Blanch in boiling water, then rinse again. Pat dry with paper towels before coarsely chopping and adding to the migas.

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