Articles by Texas Monthly

Touts

Mar 31, 1974 By Texas Monthly

PEYTON PLACE COMES TO DALLAS Bill Peyton’s antiques, ranging from the most elaborate Louis XIV or Napoleonic pieces to funky wine presses, Coca-Cola mirrors, church pulpits, and pump organs, come from all over Europe in 40-foot containers, or from estates in Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana. For 15 years he…

Touts

Feb 28, 1974 By Texas Monthly

DEGAS IN DALLAS Better known for his paintings, the French Impressionist artist Edgar Degas saw only one of his seventy-three sculptures exhibited in his own lifetime. Admirers of his work today are more fortunate. Seventy pieces, on loan for the first time from New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art,…

Touts

Jan 31, 1974 By Texas Monthly

Everybody, Sing! If you always wanted to sing with an orchestra but no conductor ever asked you, plan to be at “The Sing,” Houston’s bright new community sing-along. “The Sing” is for anyone who wants to sing the world’s great choral favorites (yes, of course, the Hallelujah Chorus is…

Touts

Jan 1, 1974 By Texas Monthly

Modern Art In Houston Since its establishment in Dallas 6 years ago, the Janie C. Lee Gallery has been known for showing the most celebrated of contemporary American artists. In mid-December, they opened a Houston branch that promises more of the same. The initial show is a group exhibition…

Why Dallas?

Dec 1, 1973 By Texas Monthly

When John Neely Bryan built his cabin he didn't know what would happen to Big D as it grew, or why it would happen. A. C. Greene searches through old photographs and records to give us the answer.

Touts

Dec 1, 1973 By Texas Monthly

Future-Shocking Exhibition Houston’s Contemporary Arts museum takes the prize again for the new and different in experimental art. Beginning sometime in mid-December (the opening date had not been selected at press time) the museum will present the combined efforts of the futuristic-oriented Ant Farm, NASA, and the Texas Medical Center,…

Touts

Jul 31, 1973 By Texas Monthly

The Real Thing While billows of smoke encircle the Holmes Road dump, the City of Houston atones somewhat for its ecological sins by its production of Hou-Actinite, a remarkable 100 per cent organic fertilizer which is recycled at the Northside Waste Water Control Facility from city waste water and raw…

Briar Patch

Jul 31, 1973 By Texas Monthly

THE SPACEMAN’S LAST GASP CRAIG RASPBERRY IS NINE YEARS OLD and strikingly reminiscent of Mr. Peabody’s pet boy Sherman on the old Bullwinkle show, down to an air of scientific detachment which seems to be a trait he shares with his fellow citizens of Aurora, Texas, of whom there are…

Touts

Jun 30, 1973 By Texas Monthly

Fiddle-Faddle Fiddler’s festival? A hillside field and a lake would be the perfect setting. But now they’ve covered it over with a shopping center and a parking lot. Seminary South isn’t country heaven, but it’s all right for a shopping center—it has lots of grass and flowers and trees…

Texas Music Source

Dec 31, 1969 By Texas Monthly

Texas music is as diverse as its people. Nineteenth-century immigrants to Texas from the American South, from Mexico, and Europe, shaped a variety of sounds unmatched anywhere else in the United States. Southern blues and ragtime, Mexican orquesta, the waltzes and polkas of Central Europe, all took root, thrived,…

Feature
Blood Simple (1984)

Dec 31, 1969 By Texas Monthly

Director: Joel and Ethan CoenPlot: Bar owner hires hit man to kill his wife and her lover. Double-crossing ensues. Excerpts from our roundtable discussion: BLOOM: I like Blood Simple too. But it’s very cinematic. It is based on images and ideas of Texas from film history and…