Elizabeth Castro

Articles by Elizabeth Castro

TMBBQFest, “23 Pitmasters in 23 Days:” Coleman’s BBQ

Oct 17, 2011 By Elizabeth Castro

Editor’s Note: The Texas Monthly BBQ Festival is almost here! Each day until then, we’ll be talking to one of the featured pitmasters, with questions from TM staffers, esteemed BBQ experts, Twitter followers and you, the readers of this blog. Today we bring you Wayne Coleman, 43, of Coleman's in Clarksville. For more info, visit their page on TMBBQ.com. What is your heat source? We use a fire oven and hickory. It’s the trademark that we decided to use. Hickory smoke. Who did you learn your craft from? I started at Coleman’s and have been in business 39 years. I learned at probably about 10, my dad taught me. What’s your signature meat? Beef. We smoke it and put sauce on it. Pretty much a family recipe. Sauce or no sauce? Sauce. We use a thin sauce, not thick. We prefer it. A lot people like our sauce, 'cause most of the time they prefer bread. They always want more bread and more sauce. The sauce has been around for 39 years, ever since we've been here. Do you make your own sausage? No, we buy it. Slow and low or high and faster? What temperature do you generally try to maintain? I like slow and low, it cooks it better to me and it always does. It’s the way we been doing it; We cook it for 15-16 hours.

TMBBQFest, “23 Pitmasters in 23 Days:” Louie Mueller BBQ

Oct 14, 2011 By Elizabeth Castro

Editor’s Note: The Texas Monthly BBQ Festival is almost here! Each day until then, we’ll be talking to one of the featured pitmasters, with questions from TM staffers, esteemed BBQ experts, Twitter followers and you, the readers of this blog. Today we bring you Wayne Mueller, 46, of Louie Mueller BBQ in Taylor. For more info, visit their page on TMBBQ.com. What is your heat source and what type of wood do you use? We use oak wood for all of our heat sources. It’s an abundant hard wood source here in our region. It provides a smoke that isn’t overpowering—it’s subtle but distinct. It works well for us and it’s readily available. There is plenty of it, so we don’t have to constantly change what type of wood we use, which would ultimately change how our product tastes. Who did you learn your craft from? Well, I started working in the family restaurant when my father took over from his father in 1972, when I was 8 years old. I worked in the restaurant until I left town to go to college, so about 10 or 11 years. I came back in 2007, when my father was ready to retire and we wanted to insure the restaurant stayed in the family. So I divested myself from an agency in Houston and moved back to Taylor. What’s your signature meat? Brisket is our number one entrée. I don’t want to say we have a cult following because that has a negative connotation, but we also have strong following of our beef ribs and sausages. Sauce or no sauce? No, we use a dry rub. We do offer a sauce, but it’s more of a complimentary hydration fluid. It doesn’t cover the meat. It’s not a thick, viscous sauce you would find in the south or anywhere else – like a ketchup kind of covering. Instead, it’s primarily made of the rubs. So it acts like a compliment to the meat instead of covering it up in sauce.