Author

Robert Draper

Robert Draper was a staff writer at Texas Monthly from 1991 until 1997. He is now a contributing writer at the New York Times magazine and National Geographic as well as a correspondent for GQ magazine. Draper is the author of several works of fiction and nonfiction, including the New York Times best-sellers Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W. Bush and Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives. A native Houstonian, he now resides in Washington D.C.

News & Politics |
September 30, 1993

Manhunt at Menard Creek

The death of a thief in the Big Thicket has federal officials probing the conduct of local lawmen—and local lawmen complaining about a federal vendetta against the Texas prison system.

Books |
July 31, 1993

Mean Streets

Larry McMurtry rallies Lonesome Dove’s geriatric survivors for a last perilous, meandering adventure in Streets of Laredo.

Politics & Policy |
November 1, 1992

Death of a Fixer

WHEN I WAS A SOPHOMORE AT THE University of Texas in 1977, my grandfather, a prominent Houston attorney, came to Austin to give a lecture to the university’s law students. After his speech, my grandfather told me he wanted to introduce me to someone. He led me toward a large

Music |
September 30, 1992

O Janis

Janis Joplin’s life was about music, rebellion, and excess—but she was influenced most by her tormented relationship with the people and spirit of Port Arthur.

Media |
April 30, 1992

True Stories

Fish gotta swim, birds gotta fly—and some folks don’t feel alive unless they’re staring at a blank sheet of paper.

True Crime |
July 31, 1991

A Guard In Gangland

Never before had a correctional officer been tried for the murder of an inmate—and never before had such chilling details been revealed about how our prisons really work.

Music |
April 30, 1991

Poor Willie

When the IRS seized all that Willie Nelson had, it was a case of the man who can’t say no meeting the men who won’t take no for an answer.

Law |
March 1, 1991

Pen Pal

A prisoner’s efforts at legal aid for fellow inmates could right wrongs—but is it good strategy to threaten a judge?