Author

William Broyles

William Broyles is a native of Baytown and was the founding editor of Texas Monthly. He then went on to create the television show, China Beach, and to write scripts for a number of films, including Cast Away, The Polar Express, Jarhead, Unfaithful, and Apollo 13, which he co-wrote with Texas Monthly writer Al Reinert. Broyles graduated from Rice University and has an M.A. from Oxford University. He also served with the Marines in Vietnam, was the editor in chief of Newsweek magazine, and is the author of Brothers in Arms. He lives in New Mexico.

The Stand Up Desk |
April 30, 1974

Behind the Lines

On a warm March morning we went looking for the grave of my great-great-grandmother Nancy Daugherty. My mother had visited the grave more than 40 years before, and remembered only that it was near the capitol and that a small iron fence encircled the plot. We found the grave amid

Politics & Policy |
March 31, 1974

Behind the Lines

We Texans have always seemed to drive more, and farther, and for perhaps stranger reasons, than just about anyone else. Young people in the bleak and monotonous landscapes of West and North Texas grew up accustomed to endless, aimless rides around the countryside and to regular trips into the cities

Behind the Lines |
March 31, 1974

Behind the Lines

We Texans have always seemed to drive more, and farther, and for perhaps stranger reasons, than just about anyone else. Young people in the bleak and monotonous landscapes of West and North Texas grew up accustomed to endless, aimless rides around the countryside and to regular trips into the

The Stand Up Desk |
February 28, 1974

Behind the Lines

Writing about Larry L. King is a difficult task that leaves me feeling like some sweating country jeweler stooped over a fine stone trying to fashion an appropriate setting out of tin. Some good writers have craft; others have soul and spirit. Larry has what great writers have: he has

The Culture |
December 1, 1973

Airport!

Dallas and Fort Worth boosters may have pushed their cities into the 21st century when they opened the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport this September.

Behind the Lines |
December 1, 1973

Behind the Lines

GOOD REPORTING SOMETIMES INVOLVES RISKS. Most people see the world outside their immediate vision through the eyes of the media, and much of the world contains people and situations that are unpleasant, distasteful, and downright dangerous. Wars fit in this category. So do murders. Becoming intimately involved in either can

Behind the Lines |
November 1, 1973

Behind the Lines

SENIOR EDITOR GRIFFIN SMITH JR.’s comprehensive study of the great law firms of Houston (page 53) ranks among the most important writing ever printed by this or any other Texas publication. It goes to the heart of a group of institutions whose influence upon our state is incalculable, and whose

Behind the Lines |
September 30, 1973

Behind the Lines

ALL OF US ARE GOING to have to stop Arthur Temple if he decides to move the headquarters of Time, Inc., to Diboll. We don’t care if Diboll is a nicer place to work than Manhattan, Arthur, you should have thought of that before you went ahead with the deal.

Behind the Lines |
August 31, 1973

Behind the Lines

RARELY DOES A WRITER PARTICIPATE as a major actor in the events he reports, although from time to time writers of more ego than effectiveness posture as characters injected into the dramas they cover, much as coloring is injected into an apple to make it red. Last spring Griffin Smith,

Behind the Lines |
June 30, 1973

Behind the Lines

TWO MONTHS AGO IN OUR story “Sex and Politics” we took an affectionate, if irreverent, look at a side of our political traditions that is as old as politics itself, but which has rarely been discussed in public. This month we wrap up the latest session of the Texas Legislature