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Immigration Memo Puts Spotlight on Abbott

Governor says there are no plans to use National Guard to detain immigrants.

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Governor Greg Abbott has been hammering officials recently in Austin and Dallas, accusing them of creating sanctuary cities that don’t comply with federal immigration law. But a draft memo written by national Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly—and made public on Friday by the Associated Press—could put Abbott in an awkward political position on immigration.

The memo calls for border states to use National Guard troops to find and detain undocumented immigrants. That would include the National Guard troops of Texas and the Texas State Guard, of which Abbott is the commander in chief. The memo, which the Trump Administration dismissed as nothing more than a draft, suggested the federal government should negotiate with Texas and other states to use the Guard as immigration enforcement officers. In effect, the memo proposes that Abbott and other governors potentially could mobilize an effective immigrant detention force. The Kelly memo said:

Pursuant to Title 32 of the United States Code, State National Guard components are employees of their respective states and are under the command of their Governors when they are not in federal service. Based on their training and experience, these men and women are particularly well-suited to assist in the enforcement of federal immigration law and augment border security operations by Department components.

It went on to urge immediate negotiations with states to use Guard and militia units as arms of federal immigration enforcement under a program called 287g, named for a section of the federal immigration code. There already are four law enforcement agencies in Texas operating under the 287g program in cooperation with the Immigration and Customs Enforcement arm of homeland security, including the Harris County Sheriff’s Office. Former Governor Rick Perry previously activated the National Guard to support federal and local authorities in border security activities, but not as actual immigration officers.

The controversy erupted early Friday when the AP reported that the Trump administration was considering activating 100,000 National Guard troops to serve as immigration enforcement officers. Trump spokesman Sean Spicer rushed to deny the report while admitting that such a discussion might have occurred. From the White House pool report:

“That is 100% not true. It is false. It is irresponsible to be saying this.”

“There is no effort at all to round up, to utilize the National Guard to round up illegal immigrants.”

“I wish you guys had asked before you tweeted,” he added. AP reporter noted they asked multiple times before publication.

Spicer couldn’t categorically state that this was never a subject of discussion somewhere in the administration.

“I don’t know what could potentially be out there, but I know that there is no effort to do what is potentially suggested.”

Abbott’s office shortly afterward issued a statement through spokesman John Wittman denying any talks are occurring with ICE. “The Office of the Governor has not received, much less seen, a memo or request from the White House or Department of Homeland Security regarding the use of Texas National Guard troops for immigration enforcement. The White House has adamantly denied there are efforts underway to mobilize the National Guard for this purpose.”

Texas House Democratic Caucus Chairman Chris Turner called the Kelly memo “dangerous and un-American.” He said Abbott should declare that Texas will not participate in such a program, but noted that two yeas ago Abbott assigned Texas state guardsmen to monitor a U.S. Army training exercise known as Jade Helm that many conspiracy theorists believed was laying the groundwork for a military takeover of Texas. “Two years ago, Governor Abbott insulted United States military special forces when he expressed angst about Operation Jade Helm, a routine training exercise. Given the governor’s past concerns about federal overreach, I’m confident he will swiftly and categorically reject and condemn this dangerous plan from the Trump Administration,” Turner said in a statement.

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  • R.G. Ratcliffe

    Incidentally, here’s a list of the law enforcement agencies that have 287g agreements with the federal government: https://www.ice.gov/factsheets/287g

  • José

    Kinda makes Guv Greg look like a slacker, doesn’t it? Counties and municipalities have to submit themselves to federal authority, and on their own nickel, but when the state gets called it’s all “nuh uh, not me!”

    • WUSRPH

      If the plan that isn’t a plan to use guardsmen ever becomes the PLAN Abbott will go along. Otherwise he’d appear to be “soft” on illegals and “all hat and no cattle” when it comes to actually doing something real about the problem. Although he certainly would not like to be associated with the pictures of armed men rounding up families including women and children and pushing them into trucks to be carried away—which is what would happen if this were to become a reality. It would just look too much like some images out o Eastern Europe from the 1940s….and that might be unpopular with some Americans.

      You might notice that Gen. Kelly seemed to be talking about using guardsmen in some other role than as THE National Guard and/or not calling them into federal service to do the roundups. It almost sounds like the idea was to get Abbott and other governors to “volunteer” a group of trained men who know how to take orders who just also happen to be members of the National Guard. That was probably intended to be a subterfuge to get around the ban on using military in police work established in 1878 by the posse comitatus act. It might avoid any posse comitatus problem if they use the State Guard since they probably do not qualify as any kind of a federal force as they are not eligible to be called into federal service.

      • WUSRPH

        It will also be interesting to see if any guardsmen refuse to go along with such a policy. “Just following orders” is not a defense.

        • SpiritofPearl

          That’s what the SS soldiers claimed.

          • WUSRPH

            It was not limited to the SS….German Army veterans liked to make people think it was just the SS…..but the entire German Army (Wehrmacht) was involved in thousands and thousands of episodes of crimes against humanity, especially on the Eastern Front.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Heard an interesting talk on NPR while driving home from The Cemetary with Lights (Indy) a number of years ago. A sociologist studied as many soldiers remaining from the SS and Gestapo, Soviets, and one other brutal dictatorship (can’t remember) to ascertain their motives for engaging in murderous war crimes. The Soviets and the one I can’t remember said they did what they did because it was a job. The Nazis said they did what they did because they believed in the IDEA, the PHILOSOPHY. Sounds familiar, doesn’t it?

      • BCinBCS

        It would just look too much like some images out of Eastern Europe from the 1940s….

        That’s the first thing that popped into my mind as I read R.G.’s article.

        The second thing that I thought was how these sorts of plans that, once they get reported, turn out not to be plans. It appears that the Comrade Trump/Bannon administration uses trial balloons as standard operating positions to see if they can get away with their craziness.

  • WUSRPH

    http://www.mccain.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/2017/2/remarks-by-sasc-chairman-john-mccain-at-the-2017-munich-security-conference

    http://tinyurl.com/gu8h2th

    If you haven’t you need to read Sen. Jon McCain’s remarks at the Munich Security Conference. This is what an
    AMERICAN who believes in America sounds like. Trump could never give a speech like this because he does not understand what America stands for.

    • Margaretjsmith

      Google is paying 97$ per hour! Work for few hours & have longer with friends and family! !dh13c:
      On tuesday I got a great new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $8752 this last four weeks.. Its the most-financialy rewarding I’ve had.. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it
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    • John Bernard Books

      what kind of American are you? You sound gullible willing to take the bait from the fake news.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/043e4f3607cb765d16bb3cfcdf937cb255b48f8300f94bf3733bd6030a58566c.jpg

    • SpiritofPearl

      So posse commitatus applies strictly to U.S. Army and Navy, not to other branches of the services nor to state national guards.

      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posse_Comitatus_Act

      • WUSRPH

        Thanks. but It would apply to them if they were called into federal service…that is probably why Gen. Kelly talked about getting the governor’s to agree to use them….He even referred to guardsmen as “employees of the state”.

        • SpiritofPearl

          Deputy Dawg . . .

      • St. Anger

        irrespective of the appropriate term, mobilizing the national guard against people living and working here is *martial law.*

        at this point, there really is no question that we are a fascist nation. new symptoms emerge daily.

        • SpiritofPearl

          No audience for their ravings anymore – “lousy ratings.” Thank heavens for the blocking function provided by Disqus!

          “Fascist nation” or “oligarchy” is the question.

          • St. Anger

            Oligarchy is what we were before.

            According to Aristotle, the only thing worse than oligarchy is tyranny.

          • SpiritofPearl

            I’m still undecided about which one reigns.

    • BCinBCS

      That’s one hellofa speech. Lately, McCain sporadically has periods of great lucidity.

      • SpiritofPearl

        Or perhaps he’s ashamed of his unabashedly partisan hack cabinet votes so far . . .

        • WUSRPH

          He has announced that he will oppose the nominee for the Budget Office.

          • St. Anger

            LOL. sure, that’s where to make your stand mccain.

          • WUSRPH

            Actually, the nominee for the Office of Management & Budget, US Rep. Mike Mulvaney of South Carolina, is one of the worst of all of Trump’s nominees. His view of the role of the federal government is primitive and his desire to cut is equally dangerous.

          • St. Anger

            i knew i’d hear back from you with something along those lines.

            but unless he is an actual criminal, or someone who has forced old ladies out into the street over pennies, or someone who has sworn to abolish the very agency they are now running (about half the cabinet), or just a walking violation of the corruption and the hippocratic oath … he isn’t the worst.

          • WUSRPH

            Pretty impressive crew Trump has put together there.

        • BCinBCS

          I wrote about a New York Magazine article on John McCain earlier. It explains this phenomena. You might want to read it.

          http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/02/john-mccain-takes-on-donald-trump.html

          • SpiritofPearl

            I already have . ..

      • BCinBCS

        I stumbled upon a lengthy but excellent article on John McCain slated to be published in the New York Magazine tomorrow (Monday). As I said, it’s long but it’s an easy read and quite interesting as it explains McCain’s reluctant position toward Comrade Trump/Bannon as well as the mind-set of those Republicans who don’t see eye-to-eye with the Tantrump-in-Chief. If you want some insight into McCain and into the how and the why that GOP opposition to Comrade Man-Child is starting to coalesce, give it a read. It’s worth the time.

        http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/02/john-mccain-takes-on-donald-trump.html

        • BCinBCS

          The New York Magazine profiling McCain has rekindled my slow burn about the Chairman of the House Oversight Committee, Jason Chaffetz (R-Doucheville). You might remember that back in October when he thought that Hillary Clinton was going to win he said about her Presidency: “It’s a target-rich environment. Even before we get to Day One, we’ve got two years’ worth of material already lined up. She has four years of history at the State Department, and it ain’t good.”

          Well now that Comrade Trump/Bannon has the Presidency and “has publicly abraded a private company for refusing to sell his daughter’s fashion line; had his senior adviser lobby CNN’s parent company (which has a proposed merger pending before the Executive branch) for more favorable news coverage; praised his former national security adviser’s (apparent) violation of the Logan Act; profited off payments from foreign governments in an apparent violation of the Constitution; and sent electronic messages over his unsecured, personal Android phone” (h/t N.Y. Mag), who is Chaffitz investigating?
          Why it’s Bryan Pagliano, Hillary’s IT man who set up her e-mail server.

          Your tax dollars at work!

          https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9ae93c19cbde4b933d7797e1ab9a449991d2762e4fd157bc55509ab6e2469e4b.jpg
          .

  • BCinBCS

    And in other news…

    The U.S. Senate passed H.J. Res. 40. They along with the House believe that the rule that includes the Social Security list of persons too mentally ill to work and manage their own money in the gun purchase background system should be rescinded.

    On welfare? Piss in a cup.
    Mentally ill? Here’s your rifle.

    • WUSRPH

      The NRA contends that making lists of people who might not be qualified to purchase a gun is unfair because the list is certain to include the names of some who are eligible and it violates their rights to make them prove it. They want the government to have to prove you are not qualified which, of course, is impossible with the nearly instantaneous background checks used for most purchases. The claim that it is better than one unqualified person get a gun than 20 qualified be denied. It is a similar position to that taken by folks who say that it is sometimes better that a criminal be freed by a technicality, etc.

      • St. Anger

        when gun owners start having to stand trial to buy a gun then that comparison will be apt.

      • BCinBCS

        Except that it’s actually 20 unqualified people getting a gun so that one qualified person doesn’t.

      • SpiritofPearl

        The verbiage in the legislation was “mental defectives.” Not cool.

  • BCinBCS

    I like a good turn of phrase and I read a great one by Robert Farley at LG&M. In an essay on the possibility and ramifications of a Comrade Trump/Bannon impeachment he was describing his thoughts on Vice President Mike Pence. He described: “Right now, Pence is a hefty insurance policy on a mobbed-up, fire-prone restaurant.”

    This was in the context of a paragraph that continued:
    The GOP appreciates the dangers associated with burning the restaurant down, and will avoid doing so unless pressed. But the insurance policy is very nice indeed, and if push comes to shove, nobody will have to shove all that hard to get a sufficient number of GOP legislators to think about impeachment. The content of the shove would involve collapsing Presidential approval ratings, poor performance in special elections, and anything particular explosive coming out of the various Russia investigations. Because of the role that Congress plays in the investigative process, the former two make the latter more likely.

    The article brings up some interesting points, is short and worth the read.

    http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2017/02/the-pence-gambit

    • SpiritofPearl

      Pence is a nasty little Christofascist. Hoosiers were thrilled when he left Indiana after one failed term.

  • BCinBCS

    Here’s the latest on the Republicans not replacing Obamacare:

    The latest trial balloon on how to pay for the benefits of Obamacare that Republicans want to keep are refundable tax credits, tax free Health Savings Accounts and Catastrophic Health Insurance.

    This combination works by allowing people to save all of the excess earnings from their paycheck into a tax free savings account until it is needed. When you get in a car accident, develop cancer, have a child with a birth defect or have a heart attack, you pay the first couple of a hundred thousand dollars out of your savings. Part of that is reimbursed as a tax credit and since you qualify for a huge tax credit because you pay so much in taxes since you make so much money, you replenish most of what you spent from your Health Savings Account. Any medical costs over the several hundred thousand dollars that comes out of your pocket/savings account is paid by your Catastrophic Health Insurance.
    East-peasy.

    Well, I’m relieved.

    This has been the latest edition of Obamacare/GOP-Tap-Dance News.

    • SpiritofPearl

      “Extra earnings?” What planet do these Republicans live on?

      • BCinBCS

        Yea, I realized normal mortals would catch that statement. It’s the multi-millionaire Congresscritters that don’t seem to have a clue why that won’t work.

  • John Bernard Books

    If you think dems are misguided and poorly informed….think again…
    “Organizing for Action, a group founded by Obama and featured prominently on his new post-presidency website, is distributing a training manual to anti-Trump activists that advises them to bully GOP lawmakers into backing off support for repealing ObamaCare, curbing immigration from high-risk Islamic nations, and building a border wall.”
    http://nypost.com/2017/02/18/obama-linked-activists-have-a-training-manual-for-protesting-trump/

    and you can get it right now if you order today for only $19.95…….

  • SpiritofPearl

    Only bad options available for America right now:

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/02/27/holding-trump-accountable

  • John Bernard Books

    Democrats have not won a statewide election in over 20 years…’
    “The chief election officers in two of Texas’ largest counties are considering whether to refer cases to prosecutors for possible charges.
    Officials in many other areas say they will let the mistakes go, adding that there was widespread confusion among workers and voters”
    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/02/19/hundreds-texans-may-have-voted-improperly.html

    even while cheating…..Texas ain’t buying what dems are selling….

  • BCinBCS

    For you history buffs, here are two articles each one interviewing a leading historian of fascism that point out many of today’s similarities with those of late-1930’s Germany.

    http://international.sueddeutsche.de/post/157058066625/we-have-at-most-a-year-to-defend-american
    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/interrogation/2017/02/historian_richard_evans_says_trump_s_america_isn_t_exactly_like_the_third.html

    • WUSRPH

      The most important statement in the article you cite is about the desire of many to reverse much of the history and accomplishments of the 20th Century:

      ” Now, one reason why we cannot forget the 1930s is that the presidential administration is clearly thinking about them – but in a positive sense. They seem to be after a kind of redo of the 1930s with Roosevelt where the Americans take a different course. where we don’t build a welfare state and don’t intervene in Europe to stop fascism. Lindbergh instead of FDR. That is their notion. Something went wrong with Roosevelt and now they want to go back and reverse it.”

  • John Bernard Books
  • John Bernard Books

    Besides being smarter than the average poster here….I’m an astute student of human behavior.
    Democrats haven’t had a dem elected to a statewide office in over 20 years, one would think they would be smart enough to change their behavior…..

    • Valentinadelliott

      Google is paying 97$ per hour! Work for few hours & have longer with friends and family! !dt12c:
      On tuesday I got a great new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $8752 this last four weeks.. Its the most-financialy rewarding I’ve had.. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it
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  • WUSRPH

    It looks like when things are going that well for Trump that he feels a need to hold another rally at which he may be worshiped like he did this week. It probably fires him up for another round….It is in fact quite common for demagogues to need another fix of public adulation…..and the way things have been going lately, Trump probably needed it pretty badly.

    • SpiritofPearl

      A friend is sharing on FB an ad from a FL newspaper for attendees to a Trump rally in Melbourne. Prizes and coupons are offered to the attendees. Sounds like “paid protesters.” Or perhaps it’s just “fake news.”

  • John Bernard Books

    A 47%er…
    ““[My husband] is a person who’s never done anything wrong and who complies with the law,” Irma Perez, the wife of the illegal immigrant, told the Texas news outlet. “We don’t know why they detained him. He was driving his own car, not my brother’s. He has nothing to do with my brother.”
    Texas law does not allow a person who does not have legal status in the U.S. to obtain a driver license or legally operate a motor vehicle.
    Perez, who admitted she is also an illegal immigrant, said her husband drove to their daughter’s school to deliver a Valentine’s Day box of chocolates.”
    http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2017/02/19/illegal-immigrant-family-shocked-immigration-laws-enforced/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social

    Was he voting….you betcha…..
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a0ed44ab875b0c4908e88534c341d24a2c1324a583327eff89ae55fde0148849.jpg

  • John Bernard Books

    Thank you ex-prez Obama…
    “What’s less impressive is that at the sub-presidential level, the Obama years have created a Democratic Party that’s essentially a smoking pile of rubble.”
    http://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/11/10/13576488/democratic-party-smoking-pile-rubble

    hay dems….you need a little more gasoline over here….

    • anonyfool

      I actually agree with you somewhat on something! Obama didn’t trust the state Democratic parties over the years and created a parallel system that starved the states’ Democratic parties so he essentially created the circumstances that led to the GOP taking over the state governorships/legislatures and by extension, the gerrymandering for the House.

  • WUSRPH

    Yesterday is not ours to recover, but tomorrow is ours to win or lose.
    LBJ

    • John Bernard Books

      You’ve been saying that for over 20 years……have you considered you may be going about it all wrong?

  • WUSRPH

    Looks like Flynn wasn’t the only contact with the Russians…..You’ve seen the reports that Trump’s “personal attorney” and a convicted felon met with some Ukrainians and discussed a possible peace deal that would, in effect, give the Russians legal control of Crimea (rather than their control by seizure) and drop the sanctions. How many other channels are Trump and the Russians using to work out a way to let them to get away with their bad behavior?

    • José

      Better question is when will Congressional Republicans finally decide to investigate. Ther is ample evidence of meaningful harm to our nation. All that’s lacking is the will of GOP leaders to do something about it.

      • WUSRPH

        Don’t expect anything for some time to come. At the most this current event could constitute a possible violation of the Logan Act, but no one has ever been prosecuted for violating it.

        There just isn’t enough public pressure on the leadership to get any investigations started. It took two years for the Congress to get around to seriously looking at Nixon’s malfeasance and that was a Democratic Congress and a GOP president. It will take numerous discoveries of misdeeds and some real foul ups before the Republican leadership does anything to investigate Trump. They will probably have to get badly burned in the next Mid-Term elections before they will even consider it. The problem is that much of the investigation will have to be done by the media and the combination of a 30-year effort by the GOP to undermine public confidence in the media and Trump’s own declaration that it is “an enemy of the people” will probably make it much harder for the public to accept what is uncovered. What is even more dangerous is that some of the less gutsy media owners will refuse to allow the investigations out of fear of Trump. Remember, most of the media stood aside during the early days of Watergate and, at the most, only reported what the Washington Post and a couple of other outlets were uncovering. Most of the media wasn’t actively involved until the some Nixonites began to turn on him and/or try to lessen their sentences for the illegal acts. To date I have yet to see anything as clearly illegal as what the Nixon people did. There have been plenty of bad policy decisions and actions contrary to what America stands for, but no really criminal acts have yet been uncovered. . Even conspiring with the Russians might not be criminal enough to call for a criminal investigation for anything other than for perjury. And that would require that they tell their lies before some official body as the courts have held that just lying to the public is not necessarily a criminal act. If it were, The Donald would have been indicted, convicted and sentenced years ago.

      • SpiritofPearl

        They are riding the tiger for whatever they can get. The cynicism is appalling.

        • BCinBCS

          …as is the hypocrisy.

  • Unwound

    hopefully RG will continue his good work here, but looks like TM’s new editor doesnt really see much value in BB

    http://www.cjr.org/business_of_news/texas-monthly-lifestyle-editor.php

    • WUSRPH

      Sorry to see that.. I’d hate to see Texas Monthly became, in effect, Texas People.

    • John Johnson

      This does not surprise me one bit. The statement about peope not being interested in politics, as a whole, is probably true, but I have to think that longterm subscribers since inception, like myself, certainly are interested in the Texas political tilt of the magazine and make up their main base. If they have lost subscribers, I would think it is not because of the political coverage, but more the trend to make their money more from advertising and less from filling the pages with interesting pieces.

      I kept sending my money in even as the printed magazine itself turned into 3/4 paid advertising and 1/4 pertinent reading. When they started the list of “best” attorneys, physicians, and realtors…all bogus paid for bullshit, I started to cancel my subscription, but I realized that I still enjoyed the great printed pieces by extraordinary investigative writers, and the ongoing source of pertinate Texas political info and commentary.

      Maybe this young whipper snapper thinks he can make more money by flushing all this and competing against the Southern Living, Country Living and Costal Living type offerings out there.

      All are going South where the printed, mailed version is considered. Look at the local newspapers…I quit subscribing to the Fort Worth Star Telegram printed version because on Monday’s and Tuesday’s a 10 mph wind would blow it out of my yard.

      If this is the direction Mr. Taliaferro wants to go, so be it, but he would be ill advised to flush the history of covering Texas politics that made TM unique and special.

      If he wants TM’s new buyer to take a massive hit on investment, he is on the right track. Turning TM into yet another “lifestyle” digital magazine should accomplish this in short order.

  • WUSRPH

    Spending full time on Making America Great Again and draining that swamp:

    Trump Has Been President For 30 Days. He’s Spent 6 Of Them Playing Golf.
    (Huff-Post)

    • donuthin2

      The more golf the better.

      • John Johnson

        Agree. Used to play several times a week. Hadn’t played in a year until this week. Hit about 300 balls at the range. Felt really good about how I was hitting them…then went out and played a round. It sucked. Drive for show…chip and putt for dough. No touch. It was ugly.

        • dave in texas

          One of the main downsides to having a M-F, 8-5 job (instead of working in the restaurant industry like I did for 20+ years) is that I don’t play nearly as much golf as I used to. I go to the range occasionally, but I really don’t like playing on weekends because a round of golf shouldn’t take 5 damned hours to play. And yeah, the short game is the first to go and the last to come back. I have the touch of a blacksmith around the greens.

          • John Johnson

            Someone asked me on the course Friday, after I had chunked about my 10th chip during the round, if I could actually “get food to my mouth with those hands”.

          • dave in texas

            That’s funny. I’m stealing that.

      • BCinBCS

        The more golf the better.

        Ab-soo-lutely!

  • WUSRPH

    One round with the Japanese Prime Minister…The rest have been sports celebrities, flunkies and contributors.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/trump-secrets-cheats-golf_us_58ab21f6e4b045cd34c3cc47?id1wj5qmfq69zr529&

    • John Johnson

      A few holes of golf is not a “round”.

      Initiating action is still action.

      Stop the foolishness.

      • WUSRPH

        By this time in his first month Obama had already pased the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act AND the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, two major bills he has promised. Trump has yet to submit a bill to Congress.

        • WUSRPH

          The problem keeping Trump from filing bills is that he talked a lot about doing a lot of things…..sometimes doing quite different things about the same problem….but never had any specifics. The bill drafters are now trying to figure out just what he wanted (or now wants, since there have been changes)…….and how to do it….This is especially hard when what he said he wanted to do and how he wanted to do it is more than difficult, possibly unconstitutional or just impossible–i.e. build A WALL and make Mexico pay for it…..put a tax, tariff or charge on imports, etc. Of course, passing the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act was not that easy either, being that it called for more than $1 trillion in infrastructure spending. Where is Trump’s plan for that?

          • John Johnson

            “During this first month” sums it up pretty well in my mind. You haters wear me out.

            You can now go back and research any, and everything, I have posted on this blog. Go back and see what I had to say about Obama during his first three months in office. Hell, I almost voted for him. Only after his allowing the Big Bank and Wall Street guys to garner their bonuses, amounting to close to a billion dollars, and paid for by us, did I start cussing him.

            If you had watched the recent PBS Frontline documentary on his presidency, you would have seen that virtually everyone who advised him during his campaign, and those he had appointed to advisory positions, told him not to allow it. He, instead, listened to a single voice…Geitner…the Wall Street guy. That did it for me.

            I am giving Trump the same three months or so before I start praising or cussing him. Might I suggest you do the same.

          • WUSRPH

            I only expect that when a person is the president and says he will do such-and-such “On my first day in office” that he will either do it or have a very good excuse for not doing it…..Even “the paperwork wasn’t ready” is better than making a promise and not doing it with no explanation.. I seem to remember you often attacking Obama for saying something and, in your biased opinion, not then doing it…..but with Trump it all seems to be okay.
            Of course, it is fine with me when it comes to him not keeping promises like the one he made to reverse the Dream Kids EO “on the first day”. I hope he never gets around to that one. The anti-climate change EO’s he is supposed to sign this week are bad enough but one that would cruelly hurt 700,000 young people for something they could not control would be much worse. Even Rick Perry was opposed to revoking in-state tuition that and said that those who would do such things had no heart.

            Glad you’ve unlocked your file so it impossible for us to “go back” to see what you have said. Mine, of course, have always been open.

          • John Johnson

            I had no idea mine was locked. I have nothing to hide.

            With regards to your “first day” comments…none of his supporters are disappointed in what has transpired in the first month…and you would be screaming doubly loud if he had of found a way to get all of his proclamations initiated on the “first day”. You think the stupid people who voted for him thought that to be true? Have his poll numbers gone down? Since I don’t keep up with, or believe in them, you are going to have to tell me.

          • WUSRPH

            The poll results are mixed…..He started out with lower approval ratings than any of the recent presidents…and still is down….I did find it interesting that despite all the horrible things he says about the media, only three percent more people thought he was more trustworthy than the reporters covering him. (Only 45% thought he was more trustworthy compared to 42% who said the media was and 10% who said neither.)

            As to whether his supporters are disappointed…I suspect that few are NOW…..but if things don’t get moving soon that can change. When those who believed “repeal and replace (with a better cheaper full coverage) plan see what actually is forthcoming….some are going to say: That’s not what he promised. And when he never gets around to some of the things he “promised” others are going to wonder why. I think that both are going to be more and more common on the months go on, but, as you say, we will see.

          • John Johnson

            Oh, I thought early on that his run for the Presidency was doomed because of no one in their right mind could accept everything he said as litteral. Then I started realizing that the other choices were more of the same, and that Trump’s exaggerations were what I had experienced in the business world, and what virtually all attorneys do when establishing a starting point in any type of negotiation. I liked it. I still like it.

            He may prove me wrong, but I predict that after he has the right people in place, and rid of several of the bad first choices and obstructionists, we will see great changes and gains.

            In the interim, you go ahead with your wailing and superficial blather.

          • WUSRPH

            Again, when a man is the president of the United States it is more than vital that both the American people and our foreign opponents can take what he says literally. Wars have been started on “little misunderstandings” of what was said.

          • John Johnson

            You are a bookworm and a political animal. Please quit projecting your limited ability to make a deal based on who you are, and who you worked for. The biggest deals are all based on money…all of them…be it political or business.

            For too long, this no borders, world marketplace view, taken by both the US based multinational corporations, and the politicians who do their bidding, have placed our country in a declining position. The Bigs gain is the average American’s loss.

            Unkept promises of better paying jobs, and more opportunity for the small businessman to compete worldwide were bogus over the last several decades…as I have pointed out from a personal standpoint with explicit examples. You ignore them.

            They are not anecdotal.

          • WUSRPH

            I really fear how you are going to react if he does what he said he would and what almost all informed observers think will happen actually does. The “lost jobs” are not coming “back”….Most never went anywhere….They were the victims of automation, not foreign competition and running overseas…The task ahead of us is “not back to the past’ but forward to the future creating new kinds of jobs, not resurrecting the past.

            A perfect example of his total lack of touch with reality is his “desire” that the pipes for the pipelines should be made of “American steel in American plants”. In reality, there is virtually no chance of that happening. They may well be “finished” in American plants and bare the name of an American company stenciled on their sides, but the basic steel (and often the rough pipe itself) will be made in foreign plants simply because, without a total reversal of the process of history for the last 70 years or so, there is virtually no way that American pipe manufacturers can make the complete product.

            One basic reason is that only a small amount of the steel slabs from which the pipes would be extruded, etc. are made in the US today. The greatest majority come as rough slabs from foreign mills as only a couple of American mills still have the ability to make them and those they make are committed to their own production and will not be available to the pipe makers. It would cost billions to restore that capacity. Where is that money to come from? The federal government? Mexico (like the wall)? It is not going to happen and could not for several years even if Trump were to insist that it be all American steel.

          • John Johnson

            Goofy retort. Since it will take a long time to build back up the US steel business, you seem to think it is not reasonable; not a lofty goal. Trump’s comments gave hope and direction to those willing to invest in building back up US steel production. If this happens, regardless of how long, the country benefits. You seem to have a tough time getting a grasp on this.

            I remember decades ago when the Chinese had massive ships set up just off of our Northwest coast that were built explicitly for producing plywood. They bought the woodchips they needed from the NW lumberyards, had them floated out to these ships, turned them into plywood and composite boards, and imported them back into us. Saved builders billions; cost US workers billions; saved US consumers millions.

            Either we are going to employ US citizens, and pay more for consumer goods, moving millions off the dole and into the realm of buyers with self earned money, or we are going to be simply a country of have’s and have not’s.

            I think the citizens of the US are willing to pay more for consumer goods if more of the population is contributing to the the tax base and costing us less in social welfare.

          • WUSRPH

            To accomplish your alleged goal for just the steel industry would require trillions of dollars of investment……most of which would have to come from the government and would have to be financed either by massive tax increases or major increases in the deficit. In addition, it would then require either govt. subsidies and/or excessively high tariffs to allow those plants to complete with foreign producers. In either case, it would be inefficient and vastly inflationary….The result would be to worsen, not improve the life of the American worker. You would in effect, be “moving millions off the dole” only by having the govt. artificially subsidize their incomes. Retreating to the past is not a solution…..autarky has never worked and not even The Donald can make it……The solution is not resurrecting the past but building a new future.

          • John Johnson

            I totally disagree with your contention that it will take government $ to build up the domestic steel industry and the time to do so. As you have told me on more than one occasion, that is anecdotal b.s.

          • WUSRPH

            China now makes more than 50% of the world’s raw steel. It will always be able to make it for cheaper than we can…and sell it for less than we can. This means that American investors will only put money into something that the government guarantees thru subsidies or tariffs. There will be no free enterprise involved.

            Who do you think is going to come up with the trillions required to resurrect an industry of the past? It either comes directly from the government or it comes indirectly from high tariffs paid by American consumers on foreign products. Either is inflationary. Either is inefficient. Either will produce “make work” and “make jobs” that are only possible because of actions taken by the government.

            Add to that that to be anywhere near competitive our plants would have to be so automated that they would provide only a handful of jobs. There would be nothing like the number of jobs there were in the old, closed plants. Any attempt to produce any where near the number of “lost jobs” would be featherbedding of the worst sort. In short, it makes no economic sense. What makes sense is to create and develop NEW industries with new kinds of jobs.

            You also seem not to understand that much of the industrial base that you see or think is disappearing was paid for by the government in the first place just before and during WW II and made possible by “cost plus” contracts with the companies.

          • WUSRPH

            I have always described myself as a social liberal and a fiscal conservative. You categories are too limited to describe reality.

          • BCinBCS

            JJ, I hate to get in the middle of your discussion with W but your knowledge is just the icing of the steel production cake. It’s a complex subject.

            Steel production is down one-third in the U.S. compared to its high in 1973 due to many factors. Even though steel production is down, the number of steel production workers is down even more, by four-fifths.

            Bringing back a heavy industry is difficult, capital intensive and, because of automation is not an efficient method of putting more people back to work. (And any new plants would probably be located in areas without unions so the wages would not be that good, anyway.)

            About 50% of all steel produced in the U.S is made from recycling existing steel rather than the much more manufacturing intensive process of making it from ore. On top of this is the factor of automation. As late as 1980, it took 10.1 man-hours to make a ton of finished steel. Now, it only takes 1.9 man-hours per finished ton. Increasing steel production by building new manufacturing plants is not an effective way of increasing employment.

            Leaving aside the additional necessity of imposing tariffs to protect this new industry due to the glut of global steel competition, there is also the long term decline in steel demand with which to contend (I don’t know but I suspect due to increased use of plastics and other polymers instead of metal).

            I am sympathetic to the plight of the American worker and to your opinion but I foresee manufacturing becoming more and more automated and the role of brute-force manual labor less and less. Future occupations will rely much more on special skills and intelligence and less on brawn.

          • SpiritofPearl

            I’m a refugee from coal country. Coal is not coming back. It’s too expensive. Why lie to coal miners? Help them adjust to the new reality instead.

          • BCinBCS

            Why lie to coal miners?

            Oh Pearl, really?
            [/s]

          • SpiritofPearl

            Just keeping them honest . . .

        • John Johnson

          You seem to forget that Trump’s promises to those who elected him were to first rescind the EO’s that Obama had enacted. He is doing just that. Apples to apples, please.

          • WUSRPH

            He made a lot of promises….most of which he has yet to keep…..There were a whole bunch of “on my first days in office” or “first day”….including repeal of the EO that protected young illegals.. Not a word yet. He also was going to “repeal and replace” as one of his first act….we’ve heard that it is coming every few days since November….NOTHING….Part of the reason is explained in my post below. You can’t make omelets out of empty egg shells…and most of his promises, pledges and “Only I” can does were and still are nothing but empty shells.

          • José

            But that only matters if you take him literally…

          • WUSRPH

            When a person is the President of the United States and makes a promise and a pledge to do something, I certainly expect to be able to rely on his word. JJ was constantly attacking Obama for saying something (“line in the sand”, e.g.) and not doing it..But it seems to be perfectly fine when Trump REPEATEDLY says he is going to do something “on my first day” and has yet to do it. Hypocrisy?

          • John Johnson

            Comparing Trump’s campaign rhetoric to Obama’s “line in the sand” proclamation tells all.

          • WUSRPH

            So, it is okay for him to have lied to the American people about what he intended to do? After al, it was just “campaign rhetoric”…..and just because people relied on to make their decision on how to vote is no reason to expect him to honor it.

          • John Johnson

            He lied about the time frame? Wow. How about the major thing that sticks in my craw about one of Obama’s unkept promises…his promise to end hedging on crude oil by those with no skin in the game…even after his own guy said it added, on average, $0.50 to each gallon of gas we purchased. His administration’s excuse was that “it is tied up in court”, since Wall Street filed suit. Have you heard anything about this since then? You think a Prez that truly wanted to fight this, and had the bully pulpit at his disposal, would have let it die there? Obama did.

            Multiply $7 to $14 dollars every time a driver fills up to what that would mean to every American family. The money wound stay in their pockets instead of into the speculators, and Big Oil’s. How many billions does this cover over a year?

            Quit defending the ridiculous. If Trump shows that his chains are being yanked like Obama’s were, and that he caves to the yanks, like Obama did, I will be screaming just as loud as you are now…but not until.

          • WUSRPH

            It is not that Trump will have his chains yanked like you claim Obama’s where….It is more that most of what he fanaticizes about doing cannot be done. See my comment, below, on the pipes for the pipelines as an example.

          • BCinBCS

            I’m not sure if I am following you…
            JJ, are you advocating eliminating the futures market?
            If so, do you want to eliminate all futures trading or just that in oil?

          • WUSRPH

            He would have to understand it berore he can answer your question. He never took or understood Economlcs 1.01.

          • José

            For me that’s the worst. I’ll never understand how so many people can be so blind to their double standards. And yet it’s so easy to see if you try. Remove the labels, cover the names, put them side by side, compare.

          • BCinBCS

            “When he makes claims like this, the press takes him literally, but not seriously; his supporters take him seriously, but not literally.”
            -Salena Zito

            …it has become clear that Trump takes himself both literally and seriously.

          • José

            And, more importantly, he takes himself profitably.

          • BCinBCS

            And on our backs.

            (The Trump family has cost the U.S. taxpayer around $11.3M this month in travel/security costs. Obama cost us around $12.1M per year.)

          • José

            A Mexican would have done the job for a lot less. I’m just saying.

          • BCinBCS

            Like (x 11 million)

          • WUSRPH

            Trump is very, very fortunate that there is no 60-Day Rule in The Congress that requires you to file all your proposed bills in the first 60 days. At this rate, he’d have maybe two in the Hopper.

      • WUSRPH

        BYW, According to CBS Obama played 333 rounds of golf during his eight years in office, an average of 41 per year. At the rate of 6 in 30 days, Trump is well on his way to breaking that record. The record appears to be held by Ike and Woodrow Wilson, who played 800 and 1200 rounds, respectively, in their eight years. GW Bush played less than 30.

        • John Johnson

          Is this the best you’ve got?

        • SpiritofPearl

          And the cost to the American taxpayers is astronomical!

      • WUSRPH

        President Trump played 18 holes with golf star Rory McIlroy
        Trump, who often criticized President Obama for his time on the course and who pledged as a candidate to play only when it would also be conducive to conducting business, had a full round with the pro player. (Washington Post)

        • John Johnson

          You are grasping.

        • SpiritofPearl

          Everybody KNOWS black presidents aren’t allowed to play golf as much as white presidents.

      • BCinBCS

        “Stop the foolishness, give him some time.”
        -John Johnson on day 1459 of Comrade Trump/Bannon’s presidency.

  • BCinBCS

    I saw this list from Billy Joe Cain of the good that Comrade Trump/Bannon is doing:

    Trump is actually making America great again. Just look at the progress made since the election:

    1. Unprecedented levels of ongoing civic engagement.

    2. Millions of Americans now know who their state and federal representatives are without having to google.

    3. Millions of Americans are exercising more. They’re holding signs and marching every week.

    4. Alec Baldwin is great again. Everyone’s forgotten he’s kind of a jerk.

    5. The Postal Service is enjoying the influx cash due to stamps purchased by millions of people for letter and postcard campaigns.

    6. Likewise, the pharmaceutical industry is enjoying record growth in sales of anti-depressants.

    7. Millions of Americans now know how to call their elected officials and know exactly what to say to be effective.

    8. Footage of town hall meetings is now entertaining.

    9. Tens of millions of people are now correctly spelling words like emoluments, narcissist, fascist, misogynist, holocaust and cognitive dissonance.

    10. Everyone knows more about the rise of Hitler than they did last year.

    11. Everyone knows more about legislation, branches of power and how checks and balances work.

    12. Marginalized groups are experiencing a surge in white allies.

    13. White people in record numbers have just learned that racism is not dead. (See #6)

    14. White people in record numbers also finally understand that Obamacare IS the Affordable Care Act.

    15. Stephen Colbert’s “Late Night” finally gained the elusive #1 spot in late night talk shows, and Seth Meyers is finding his footing as today’s Jon Stewart.

    16. “Mike Pence” has donated millions of dollars to Planned Parenthood since Nov. 9th.

    17. Melissa FREAKING McCarthy.

    18. Travel ban protesters put $24 million into ACLU coffers in just 48 hours, enabling them to hire 200 more attorneys. Lawyers are now heroes.

    19. As people seek veracity in their news sources, respected news outlets are happily reporting a substantial increase in subscriptions, a boon to a struggling industry vital to our democracy.

    20. Live streaming court cases and congressional sessions are now as popular as the Kardashians.

    21. Massive cleanup of facebook friend lists.

    22. People are reading classic literature again. Sales of George Orwell’s “1984” increased by 10,000% after the inauguration. (Yes, that is true. 10,000%. 9th grade Lit teachers all over the country are now rock stars.)

    23. More than ever before, Americans are aware that education is important. Like, super important.

    24. Now, more than anytime in history, everyone believes that anyone can be President. Seriously, anyone.

  • BCinBCS

    What possibly could go wrong with this?

    Alabama Senator Gerald Allen has introduced Alabama Senate Bill 24 (SB24) that would repeal the current Alabama statute that requires a permit to have a concealed handgun on your person or in a vehicle. Further, it will allow everyone who was previously denied a lawful permit to now be able to conceal a handgun … anywhere.

    http://www.dailykos.com/stories/2017/2/20/1635863/-Alabama-Sheriff-suddenly-realizes-the-gun-nuts-are-not-his-friends

  • John Bernard Books

    WASSUP’s hero…
    “Johnson was reckless, grandiose, and intimidating, but he got things done, with the help of the GOP. Austin, Texas – As president, he cut a grandiose figure. He was a braggart and a frequent liar. He was suspicious of other countries, frequently saying, “Foreigners are not like the folks I am used to.” He had a reckless disregard for limits. He belittled and browbeat others to intimidate them and give him what he wanted. Historian Robert Dallek said that he “viewed criticism of his policies as personal attacks” and opponents of his policies “as disloyal to him and the country.” He would bully and insult reporters, saying of one that he “always knew when he was around, because he could smell him.” He told whoppers about voter fraud in his elections. But he did get things done, dominating the political scene for good and for ill.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/445060/lyndon-johnson-donald-trump-grandiose-bullying-colossal-figures

    all he needed was a D by his name then the blinders came on……

  • BCinBCS

    The schadenfreude; the schadenfreude.

    From the Dallas News:

    If the first casualty of war is truth, then the first casualties of trade war are the working man and woman. And first among them is about to be the iconic Texas rancher.
    […]
    …the Texas cattle rancher now faces a new threat: the Trump administration’s blundering, blustering trade policy. By threatening a trade war with Mexico within days of inauguration, the president helped trigger a slide in cattle futures. Mexico is a major export market. By sinking the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the new administration cut off long-sought access to the Japanese market. Now banks have raised the conditions for collateral for loans for ranchers.

    Texas ranchers, though, will not be alone for long. Beef producers from Nebraska to the Dakotas face the same problems. So do grain farmers in Kansas and the snow-covered corn fields of Iowa, just like tomato farmers in California and Florida and autoworkers in Michigan, longshoremen, truckers and railway workers in Miami and Houston and Long Beach. These will be the first casualties of a trade war.
    […]
    The first to go down was the Trans-Pacific Partnership. And re-writing the rest means, at the very least, injecting uncertainty into what the new rules of trade look like. At the worst, it means that the trade wars will resume in earnest. No state in the country has more exposure to economic damage in each scenario than Texas.

    Texas doesn’t remotely fit the mold of Trump’s enfeebled America that is losing jobs to competitors overseas. Texas is the largest exporter among the 50 states with nearly $280 billion in exports, according to state data. The top destinations: Mexico, followed by Canada, Brazil and China, three of which are now embroiled in trade disputes with Washington even as Texas exports oil, coal, petrochemicals, heavy machinery and transportation equipment.
    […]
    More Texans work in trade than in oil and gas. Nearly a half-million work for foreign-owned companies…
    […]
    The irony, of course, is that states like Texas, the plains states and Michigan all helped put Trump in office. But the cows in pasture don’t care about politics. And cowboys rightly don’t care about irony, even if they are to be its first casualties.

    -Richard Parker (Texas State University)

    http://www.dallasnews.com/opinion/commentary/2017/02/16/first-casualties-trumps-trade-wars-texas-cattle-ranchers

    • SpiritofPearl

      What goes around comes around.

    • donuthin2

      Texas probably has the most to lose from the Trump presidency and will be the last to realize it. So much for critical thinking.

      • SpiritofPearl

        Are Texans educable? Or will they blame their eventual misfortune on Obama?

  • WUSRPH

    Of course some US corporations will like import tariffs….It will allow them to compete with more foreign producers. The only people who will dislike it….if they realize the cause…will be the American consumer who will have to pay inflated costs for what is basically now a subsidized product. Maybe good politics, but horrible economics. Add your 20% tariff to the price of everything from shirts to cars.

    • John Johnson

      Are you using the word “subsidy” for “import tariff”? It would seem so.

      • WUSRPH

        An import tariff is an indirect form of a subsidy. It makes it possible for the manufacturer to sell his product at a higher price than would otherwise be the case by artificially increasing the price of the imported good above what he charges. The difference between that an a direct subsidy is that it is not paid directly to the company. It is, however, directly paid by the importer of the goods and passed onto his customers thereby artificially inflating the price they would normally have to pay.

        • John Johnson

          OK…I see your point, but you don’t see mine. Consumer goods will go up. Not the 20% your predict, but some. I bought my US made Whirlpool refrig at a great price when compared to imports. More products will be produced here if corporate tax laws and trade agreements are reworked.

          When people without jobs have jobs, all of us “have’s” will appreciate that the “have not’s” who move into the job market will be moved off of gov taxpayer funded help programs, and will be able to buy consumer goods with their earned money and grow the economy. That’s my take.

          • WUSRPH

            I fully understand what you hope will happen….All I am is saying is that your hope is just that–a hope that probably will not be fulfilled. There just won’t be enough “jobs brought back” to offset the inflationary increase in virtually everything you buy.

            BYW We have purchased both a new Whirlpool washer and driver during the last year and bought them for the same “American made” reason. However, if you check the “American” labels carefully you will see that they say that the machines were “engineered and assembled” in the US. Virtually all the parts were made in Mexico.

          • John Johnson

            We disagree. Imagine that.

            You have no idea how many jobs might be created by a bit of protectionism, or where they will come from…nor do I. We will see what consumer prices do and how our economy is affected. All I know is that for decades it has not been working, and I subscribe to the thinking that making the same mistakes over and over again is goofy.

          • BCinBCS

            Protectionism might not be necessary if laid-off workers are adequately trained. From the Atlantic:
            (emphasis is mine)

            “As some types of manufacturing disappear in America—manual jobs that can be performed in places like Mexico where there are lower wages, and repetitive ones that can be automated—other types are growing. So-called advanced manufacturing, which is highly specialized and requires a facility with computers, is actually expanding. The U.S. economy will need to fill 3.5 million skilled manufacturing jobs over the next decade, the White House says. This is an industry that employs skilled and educated workers such as engineers and scientists. It’s also an industry that adds significant value to the economy. Manufacturing output continues to rise in the U.S., and the average factory worker makes $180,000 worth of goods every year, more than three times what he produced in 1978.

            ‘The mantra that we’ve lost good-paying jobs to China is exactly wrong,’ said Michael Hicks, an economics professor at Ball State University who has studied manufacturing in Indiana. ‘We’ve lost the bad-paying jobs to China and gained good-paying jobs.’

            Of course, the U.S. has lost 5 million manufacturing jobs since 2000, and those losses have reverberated across the country. The scale of those losses has overshadowed areas of growth—but there has been growth. For example, the number of workers employed manufacturing medical equipment and supplies has grown eight percent over the last two decades, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, even as overall manufacturing employment has fallen 28 percent over that same time period.

            Indeed, manufacturing job losses have been concentrated in lower-pay, lower-skill jobs, said Hicks. Since 2000, jobs in manufacturing for people with graduate degrees have grown by 32 percent. While manufacturing jobs for people with less than a high-school education fell 44 percent between 2000 and 2013, those for people with an associate degrees in academic fields rose 17 percent, according to the Congressional Research Service.

            That’s because in the last decade, as manufacturing companies faced intense competition from overseas, they invested in equipment and technology that made their plants more efficient and specialized, Hicks said. That meant that thousands of jobs were automated, but also that new jobs were created for people who worked with machines in the manufacturing process. This increased specialization is exactly what economic theory predicts would happen as trade advances, Hicks said. A concept known as comparative advantage suggests that countries should use their assets to specialize—to make what they make best. Because of comparatively low costs of labor in countries such as China and Mexico, those countries specialize in making the kinds of goods that require a lot of labor but not as much technology and skill. For the United States, the result is the opposite: Its advantage is the kind of high-cost, high-skilled manufacturing that capitalizes on the country’s technology and educated labor pool. “Our comparative advantage would be towards more sophisticated production,” Hicks said.

            This is a key point often missed in the debate over whether it’s trade or automation that has displaced American jobs. Automation and trade are deeply entwined phenomena; trade increases pressures to automate or export simple jobs, but also incentivizes the U.S. to specialize and create more high-paying jobs.

            In some ways, the whole narrative that manufacturing is disappearing is flawed, Hicks says. Manufacturing, like most other industries in America, has modernized and become more sophisticated over the decades. To be sure, it employs millions fewer people than it did in the past. But manufacturing still makes up about 12.5 percent of America’s gross domestic product, the same as it did in 1960. People who can work in modern manufacturing—those with computer skills and advanced degrees—are in demand. The average manufacturing worker now makes $26 an hour, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

            The catch is that traditional manufacturing workers don’t have those advanced degrees, and can’t get those jobs. “Maybe the problem isn’t so much the industry job losses, but that the men and women in manufacturing had much poorer educational attainment, and had been in less technically dynamic workplaces, Hicks told me. “ So, when the world changed, they could not.”

            https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2017/01/america-is-still-making-things/512282/

          • John Johnson

            A compelling piece.

            What it did not address is an open border policy which has produced an additional 10 million or so uneducated, poor people, who depend on social services here to survive. Most speak rudimentary English if any.

            In an early education public classroom, my grandchildren who have advanced learning, due to pre-school learning at home due to circumstances and family involvement, sit bored while teacher’s attempt to bring non-English speakers up to speed.

            Is this how to start out this “technical” education this guy talks about? How about requiring Algebra II to graduate?

            What about US corps soliciting and securing green card holders in advanced fields to replace US educated employees at a reduced cost?

            Why is it that nurses in many hospitals are foreign trained? I can tell you. They have done away with having US trained on their payroll and gone to subcontractors to supply and pay their salaries. Those foreign green card holders work for less money.

            I have had just as tough a time understanding some hospital nurses, and doctors, as I have the people somewhere in Timbuktu who I get on the line when I have problems with my cable or phone service.

            I see it. Why can’t you?

  • SpiritofPearl
  • John Bernard Books

    PRESIDENT Trump spoke at the National Museum of African American History and Culture.
    “”Today and every day of my presidency I pledge to do everything I can to continue that promise of freedom for African-Americans and for every American,” Trump said, calling his tour “a meaningful reminder of why we have to fight bigotry and hatred and intolerance.””
    http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/21/politics/donald-trump-visits-african-american-museum/

    unlike racist dems who speak down to black Americans in condescending tones….President Trump addressed them as equals with respect.

  • WUSRPH

    Trump just cannot seem to stop pilling up the similarities between his regime and that one in Germany during the 1930s and 40s. The latest one is the image created by his newly announced policy of no longer sending illegal aliens not from Mexico back to there home countries but, instead, just dumping them across the line or river in Mexico to fend for themselves.

    Sounds a lot similar to what those Germans did to 15,000 to 17,000 Polish Jews(many who had qualified for German citizenship but had it revoked for not being “German”) in October of 1938 when it rounded them up and dumped them just across the border into Poland, which refused to do anything for them. The result was a bunch of people wandering around in the open areas at border crossings with no food or shelter. Many, of course, died.

    I guess showing Mexico how we can get tough unless it cooperates with THE WALL is more important than people’s lives.

    • WUSRPH

      The quiz answer:
      A son of one of a couple dumped into the no-man’s zone by this act was a student in Paris. In retaliation he went to the German Embassy in Paris and there shot to death an embassy official. This killing was used to justify stirring up the mobs in Germany who on Nov. 9-10, 1938, “Crystal Night”, attacked Jewish owned businesses and institutions and individual Jews all across the country, including burning down numerous Synagogues. They also shattered the plate glass windows of Jewish-owned stores. The event gets its nickname from the scene of that broken glass on the sidewalks. (The German govt. later made the German Jewish community pay the cost for all repairs and confiscated any insurance payments they had received.) The even stirred up anti-German feelings around the “civilized world” to such an extent that even AH, himself, later said it had been a major mistake. One of those weird happenstances of history is that the assassinated embassy official was a secret opponent of the regime.

  • WUSRPH

    The Washington Post’s analysis of the truth or falseness (mostly that) of Trump’s statements and claims in his first 30 days:

    http://tinyurl.com/jpfyfko

  • WUSRPH

    I may have to give Trump credit for something—his pick of Gen. McMasters as the replacement for Gen. Flynn as national security advisor. Of course, he only gets the credit if he knew what a bomb McMasters can be when he named him. If no one bothered to tell him, he gets no credit.

    McMasters, as you may know, is semi-famous in the Army for WHILE IN THE ARMY publishing a book attacking the just past Chief of Staff of the Army and the rest of the Joint Chiefs of Staff for “dereliction of duty” for going along with LBJ’s strategy in Vietnam altho they knew it was not working. Unless there have been major changes in his views since then, he is clearly not a man to go along to get along with Trump’s somewhat confused and uninformed ideas about foreign policy without telling him so and without resigning in protest if the thinks the president is wrong. McMasters is clearly not the kind of yes men Trump is supposed to want surrounding him.

    Maybe some good will come out of having had Flynn in the job for the first few weeks. He screwed it up enough that they actually wound up with a qualified appointee.

    • BCinBCS

      And McMaster got Comrade Trump/Bannon to allow him to pick his own Chief-of-Staff.

      • WUSRPH

        Of course it is clear that Trump would have preferred to keep Flynn and would have if Pence had not become aware that Flynn had “inadvertently briefed him with incomplete information” as Flynn put it (i.e.lied his ass off to Pence). The fact that Trump knew for two weeks before Pence found out and did nothing is clear proof he would have let the lie pass otherwise and kept Flynn on staff. The result is Trump now has to settle for someone whose views may be quite different from Flynn and his in order to cover up that mess. If Flynn had not lied to Pence, Pence would have gone along with the official story and all would have been okay.

        • BCinBCS

          As the Pendejo in Chief said, he going to appoint “The Best, Only the Best”.

  • John Bernard Books

    Sam Sparks needs to have a mental exam
    “U.S. District Judge Sam Sparks ruled Tuesday afternoon that Texas clinics affiliated with Planned Parenthood can continue to care for patients under the state’s Medicaid program, a phew-worthy victory for reproductive rights advocates and a loss for the state’s GOP leaders.”
    https://www.texastribune.org/2017/02/21/planned-parenthood-medicaid-court/

    like the 9th circus court of appeals almost 90% of Sparks rulings are over turned…..

  • donuthin2

    Feral Hogs are a real problem in Texas, especially in rural areas but even in the fringe of urban areas. Silly Sid has authorized the use of warfarin to poison them. I have no idea of how much he or his staff have analyzed the collateral effects. Since he is not much of an advocate for science, I doubt very much.

    • BCinBCS

      …the collateral effects.

      It depend on the carrier for the anti-coagulant. If he uses a grain such as corn, expect a lot of dead deer, possums, armadillos and the occasional sheep, cow and horse.

      • WUSRPH

        They claim they will avoid that by putting the poisoned feed in a trap that only an animal as strong as a feral pig can force open…..but you have to wonder whether that will do the trick. There is no question, however, that feral pigs are unwanted and need to be mostly removed from the environment.

        • BCinBCS

          A trap that only a hog can open is a trap from which juvenile and infant hogs will not be able to feed. This system will reduce feral hog populations, not eliminate them.

          • donuthin2

            I doubt that it will significantly impact the population. Many trappers out there that sell them and they have had little effect. Not sure why this will be more effective or less costly. Someone will have to run the traps to remove the dead ones. We will see how it goes.