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Is Ted Cruz Likeable Enough To Be President?

George W. Bush raises a simple critique with complex implications.

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Associated Press | David J. Phillip

Over the weekend George W. Bush spoke at a fundraiser, held in Colorado, for his brother Jeb’s presidential campaign. The event was private, but Politico’s Eli Stokols asked around, and turned up something interesting. Bush is supporting his brother’s bid for the Republican presidential nomination, obviously, and he was mostly temperate in his comments about Jeb’s rivals. There was one exception, though; the second president Bush doesn’t have a good impression of his one-time employee, Texas’s junior senator, Ted Cruz:

 “I just don’t like the guy,” Bush said Sunday night, according to conversations with more than half a dozen donors who attended the event.

A candidate’s “likeability” is hard to quantify. The closest proxy we have, I guess, would be favorability, and if you look at those tracking polls, Cruz’s numbers are seemingly unremarkable. The most recent results show that 28 percent of people have a favorable impression of him, and 43 percent see him in an unfavorable light; Jeb Bush, Rick Perry, Rand Paul, and Donald Trump all have a similar favorability gap.

But asking whether you have an unfavorable impression of someone isn’t the same as whether you like them; the former question is about your thoughts and the latter is about your feelings. Bush’s judgment of Cruz–I just don’t like the guy–is an essentially visceral assessment. In that sense, the comment doesn’t really tell us much about Cruz. It just reminds us of what we already knew about Bush, a man who often invoked his “gut” or “instinct” in making executive decisions during his years in public office, who could be stubbornly resolute in the face of contrary evidence, and whose more complex feelings about himself and his family were more often expressed in behavior than articulated in words. Those are very human traits on Bush’s part, though, and as far as I can tell, a lot of people share his feelings on the subject in question. And so Bush’s comments over the weekend do highlight a potential problem for Cruz’s candidacy, a deceptively obvious liability that Bush summarized well: A lot of people just don’t like the guy.

Readers who agree with the sentiment may consider this liability to be glaringly obvious rather than deceptively so, and I suspect that quite a few readers are in that camp. Since Cruz was first elected to the United States Senate in 2012, I’ve heard more people than I can count express the same kind of aversion that Bush did over the weekend. I’ve heard it so often that I think it has to be taken seriously, even though the feeling has consistently been reported without reference to a compelling explanation, and often without any stated reason at all.

While reporting Texas Monthly’s 2014 profile, for example, I talked to dozens of sources who had personal history with Cruz—these were conservatives, contemporaries, most of them Texans. Some of them did express a visceral distaste for the senator. But when I asked those sources to elaborate, none of them produced a concrete reason. They just disliked the guy. The only explanations offered were ex post facto and unconvincing.

Stokols’ story offers a useful example of what I mean. At the fundraiser, Bush went on to say that he finds Cruz’s alliance with Donald Trump, the Republican frontrunner, “opportunistic.” I agree, obviously. I’ve criticized Cruz for cozying up to Trump several times. At the same time I’d also say it’s opportunistic to gossip about the parentage of a rival’s adopted child, to dispute another rival’s military service, or to promote ballot initiatives on hot-button issues that in the hopes of boosting swing-state turnout during an election year, without regard for how the results might affect thousands of regular people for years to come.

And though Bush and Cruz may have had their private disputes, the public record suggests that if either of the two has occasion to resent the other, it would be Cruz. He was part of the legal team that put Bush in the White House in 2000, only to be rewarded with an obscure position at the Federal Trade Commission, only to be further rewarded, in 2012, by the widespread perception among the Texas grassroots that he was a paid-up crony of the big-spending George W. Bush. It’s true that as Texas’s solicitor general Cruz argued Medellin v Texas at the Supreme Court, and that the state’s victory came at the expense of the Bush administration. It’s also true that he won the approval of George H. W. Bush at some point, thus furthering the tension between himself and Karl Rove. Neither feat, I think, was fundamentally motivated by a desire to undermine George W. Bush; I can’t recall an example of Cruz directly undermining his former boss. His statement in response to Stokols’ story was gracious, considering that Bush basically handed Cruz an opening to take a swing at Jeb and shore up his outsider credentials: “I have great respect for George W. Bush, and was proud to work on his 2000 campaign and in his administration. … I met my wife Heidi working on his campaign, and so I will always be grateful to him.”

Cruz himself has acknowledged the seemingly disproportionate disdain he elicits from his critics, but I’m not sure any of them have softened in response. They may see such comments as self-valorizing rather than self-deprecating, since Cruz has also said that he’s “reviled in Washington” but appreciated back home, implying that his unpopularity is due to his stalwart commitment to principles. In any case, Bush’s criticism of Cruz is a reminder that feelings exist independently of reasons, and that while the latter may be invoked to substantiate the former, it’s rarely the other way around. So it’s of little practical consequence whether Bush’s instinctive aversion to Cruz is well founded or justified. The more important question is how many voters, fairly or not, feel the same way.

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  • Absolutely compared to grandma Clinton.

    • icanhazconservative?

      All the Republican front runners are either older than Clinton or within a few years of her age, so kind of a silly critique considering that.

      • Indiana Pearl

        Booksie loves grandmas.

    • Indiana Pearl

      Another gratuitous “grandma” slam from the Fort Bend Fatso . . .

      I’ll say this for Cruz – he’s not obese, but he does remind me of Grandpa Munster:

      http://s15.photobucket.com/user/kingpopgun/media/al2.jpg.html

      • highcourt

        Physically he is so odd looking, he stoops & walks like an OLD Man.. his body looks so soft & out of shape.. his face.. ay. chin & nose so long.. no lips & beady eyes.. vile & repulsive the longer one looks at him,,

        • wessexmom

          A young Grandpa Munster.

    • highcourt

      she is very proud being grandma. but better start practicing saying Madame La President.. as this Benghai hearing meant to bury her has only unwittingly.. perversely.. handed her the Oval Office.

      • Indiana Pearl

        “Grandma President”!

  • icanhazconservative?

    Here’s one example: the painting Cruz has of himself before the Supreme Court in a case he lost. He says he has this painting to keep him humble, but if you look at it, every eye is on him, the Justices are captivated by his words, and it is painted from the perspective of behind the court artists, all drawing pictures of Cruz. He seems to have a halo around his head. It’s this kind of arrogance-disguised-as-humility that makes people dislike him. https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/GuX4XgyFv8kXzjxpTHfVeGgVPjnZPn9aEPMzTtmMpbGJEetNUOusuiZUMtZAoGAXW-atx7Jg4_fCYEMtps44ULrOvs1NMgNTajJ0UT96V4jFc2yiMJINpFay

    • Erica Grieder

      I’ve heard a lot of people say this–that they don’t like Cruz because he’s arrogant–and I believe they’re saying that sincerely, but I still think it’s weird…if someone’s running for president, I think it can be safely assumed that they have pretty high self-esteem.

      • icanhazconservative?

        There’s a difference between high self-esteem and arrogance. The synonyms for arrogant are haughty, conceited, self-important, egotistic, full of oneself, superior.

        The synonyms for self-esteem are self-respect, pride, dignity, self-regard, faith in oneself.

        • highcourt

          agree, Cruz suffers from low self-esteem..he doesn’t have any.. in fact.. but has this huge ego. I loathe him the moment I laid eyes on him.. and I rarely do this..

          • Rob G

            Yea – at the debate, Cruz cowered when Trump chided him about his private criticisms.
            Low self esteem drives people to do amazing things on the surface, but in a pinch, Cruz is not the guy you want in your foxhole.

      • Indiana Pearl

        He seems manipulative and untrustworthy.

      • highcourt

        he has very low esteem.. he suffers from great insecurity & he has this huge huge ego.. a deadly combination.. that is the combo of all despots who has wreaked havoc in history,

        • Rob G

          Did you switch subjects to Trump?

    • highcourt

      really.. he has this painting?? he really suffers from megalomania,, I know why people instinctively don;t like him.. he is fundamentally amoral… he covets absolute power in it’s truest sense,
      in all my years of following politics. I have seen some crooks.. nixon .. etc.. bur with cruz.. he is really a fascist in born again c hristian clothing..

    • Rob G

      Very well put! Arrogance disguised as humility.

  • Joe Wierzbicki

    What you left out of your analysis is that among Republican voters Cruz routinely has one of the highest net-positive favorable ratings among the Republican presidential candidates. Rank-and-file Republicans are more concerned with whether Cruz is standing up to the “Washington Cartel” than whether or not he is good at the back-slapping political cronyism game.

    • Bad Blood

      Correct. And in a new poll, he has 90/1 favorability amongst tea partiers. That’s nothing to shake a stick at.

      • Bad Blood
      • Joe Wierzbicki

        Yes, the Quinnipiac Iowa poll. Interestingly I was just reading an analysis of the candidates who score worst with the “won’t vote for” numbers. Donald Trump had the highest “won’t vote for” number at 30%. Bush was at 21% in the won’t-vote-for question. Lindsey Graham had 15%. Chris Christie had 14%. Rand Paul 10%, Rick Santorum 10% and George Pataki 10%. In fact, Ted Cruz’s “wont-vote-for” number was only 7% – which was the 4th best. Considering the issue is how many GOP voters hold a “I just don’t like the guy” perception, this latest polling data shows that it’s really the entrenched political class which is irked by Cruz – and with good reason, as he has been one of their loudest and most-consistent critics.

        • Bad Blood

          Well, and part of the problem with many of the polls conducted to date is they’ve been — at best — registered republicans. Which does not deliver the same results as polling likely voters or likely caucus goers as this Quinnipiac IA poll.

      • Erica Grieder

        I know it’s easy for those of us in Texas to forget this, but to become president you have to actively win the primary AND the general.

        • Bad Blood

          Gotta make the big dance before you can win the big dance.

          • wessexmom

            Winning the GOP primary in this election will all but ensure a loss in the general election. Americans will not elect Trump or Cruz as president, who are, at this point the only candidates poised to win the primaries. The only GOP candidates that might have a shot at the general are Kasich and to a lesser extent, Christie, and they will never get out of single digits in the primaries as they are both despised by the base. November 2016 is going to be massacre for the GOP.

          • Bad Blood

            Yeah, I just think you’re wrong here. Hillary is a terrible candidate. She’s polling even or below every GOPer under the sun.

        • dave in texas

          But as has been shown, especially over the last couple of presidential election cycles, the things a candidate has to say to appease the base and win the primary can go a long way toward ensuring that the candidate has no chance in the general election. I think Senator Cruz falls squarely into this paradigm.

          • Bad Blood

            Let’s also not forget that there’s a self-described socialist driving the other side farther left.

          • Indiana Pearl

            What’s wrong with socialists?

          • Bad Blood

            Do you run around trying to pick fights all the time? I mean seriously, do you enjoy that? Grow up or leave me alone.

            No one said there was anything wrong with socialists other than the fact that I happen to think they’re wrong. I don’t think their malevolent. I don’t think they’re my enemy. I don’t think they’re trying to destroy the country. They just happen to be on the far left of the political spectrum, and they’re considerably to the of the American public.

            I brought it up in response to the suggestion that Cruz may have said or done things to appease those on the right that might be distasteful to the more centrist aforementioned American public.

          • Indiana Pearl

            You seem to be an Angry White Guy. And I’m not going anywhere . . .

          • Bad Blood

            I’m not angry, I’ve attempted to be respectful and make coherent arguments, and I didn’t ask you to go anywhere.

            In my short time commenting here (I’ve been a reader for much longer), you’ve followed me around with nonsense. I have neither the time nor the will to engage if you’re not going to be serious, actually attempt to make an argument, or fall back on to ever-so-convincing “nu uh.”

            I’ve asked you to leave me alone. Please respect my request. I’ll communicate with you no more.

          • Indiana Pearl

            If you want to preach to the choir, go to redstate or breitbart.

          • TrulyJulie

            I didn’t realize you now personally own Texas Monthly and the liberal fest that it has become. Last time I picked up the magazine, it was for ALL subscribers and our opinions matter as much as yours does. We’re not required to stay within the boundaries of expression that you have deemed acceptable for us.

          • Indiana Pearl

            Wrong. TM doesn’t permit crude verbiage as JBB discovered. TM permits JBB to post endlessly with no restrictions on how much bandwidth he uses. He has made ateicious comments about veterans that go uncensored.

            Community standards . . .

          • TrulyJulie

            “ateicious comments”? What exactly is “ateicious” again? Mr. Webster seems to have misplaced the word in his dictionary.

          • Indiana Pearl

            Typo. You knew that, but are wickedly cutesy.

          • John Johnson

            People are tired of wiseass comments.

          • Indiana Pearl

            Gimme a break, JJ. You, of all people, are in no position to comment.

          • John Johnson

            Oh, yes I am. Did I say “YOUR wiseass comments”? Several of us need to pull it back a notch.

          • highcourt

            the problem with US.. socialism has a dirty cannotation as people are not well versed in what it truly means and how it can work with a democracy.. which it can.. in fact.. it is the only way to improve the standard of living for a country this size, Socialism doesn’t immediately mean., communist russia.. far from it..

          • Indiana Pearl

            I know that and you know that, but it is routinely used by folks on the right as a pejorative. Most of them couldn’t define socialism with a gun pointed at their heads.

          • dave in texas

            Or, as he’s been taking pains to explain, more of a Democratic Socialist. At any rate, I find a slight move to the left (and it is very slight) to be a much-needed corrective to the way the country has lurched hard to the right over the last 35-40 years. If we’re being honest, Ronald Reagan, Dwight Eisenhower, Richard Nixon (even if you take out Watergate), and George H.W. Bush wouldn’t stand a chance in a Republican primary today. My basic political beliefs haven’t really changed all that much in the last 40 years, but those beliefs have gone from being seen as centrist, or maybe even slightly to the right of center, to being seen as far left.

          • Bad Blood

            Well, we will see how it goes. I, for one, would love a Cruz v. Sanders general election. Talk about a defining choice that would have the entire political class in Washington in crisis mode.

            And I’ll confess that I’m actually a little disappointed for Democrats that Joe Biden made the decision not to run. I think Hillary Clinton is a horrible candidate, is only looking out for herself and her own political ambitions, has no actual guiding ideology — and some very questionable things in her past. The Democratic party deserves better from its nominee. Maybe Bernie will pull it off.

          • dave in texas

            Yeah, it’ll be interesting. Cruz v. Sanders would be wild, but I think both of them have hit pretty close to their peak popularity. Cruz might get a bump in Iowa, since the religious right is so strong there, but New Hampshire, where it’s not, would bring him back down to earth. I’ve never really been much of Hillary fan, and I’ll probably vote for Bernie in the primary, but I’ll absolutely vote for Hillary over any of the grifters and hacks the GOP is putting out there.

          • donuthin2

            Been watching the hearings off and on. Repulican are coming across as very political. Afraid it is an assist to Clinton. That along with the speaker debacle is not a good omen.

        • nickthap

          That’s why a Texan will never be President again in our lifetimes. But it’s easy for YOU to forget this since you’re a partisan.

        • wessexmom

          Not hard for me. Can’t YOU see that the wing nut base is the monster Karl Rove created back in 2004 to ensure that his guy W would not lose the popular vote again? And now the beast has turned on its maker, Rove and his company of cynical GOP cronies, and it may very well kill the whole party as well.

    • highcourt

      that’s a fallacy.. how can anyone believe one can be president & govern effectively being an outsider.. if so.. then the teatards wants martial law & a total dictatorship.. that’s what that means,

      • Joe Wierzbicki

        No point having a serious discussion about political viability with someone who thinks it’s so funny to call their opponents “teatards” as if they were 5 years old on the playground during recess break.

    • Rob G

      Notice he polls very low with women. He creeps out my wife and my mother in law; both very conservative voters that i fear may vote for Hillary, in a Cruz/Hillary match up.

  • nickthap

    I’ll answer that question for you, Erica: probably the vast majority of voters are repelled by him.

    • I think ‘repelled’ is perfect in this case. I can’t stand him. He’s an arrogant and condescending jackass. The fact that he signs his emails “For Liberty, Ted Cruz” makes me want to vomit every time I think about it.

      • TrulyJulie

        Oh, certainly! Because what could possibly be more vomit-inducing than liberty? *rolls eyes*

  • How can you not like him in his hand made lizard skin boots?

    • Bad Blood

      More partial to alligator, myself.

    • Indiana Pearl

      Grandpa Munster.

      • wessexmom

        You see it too? I’ve always described Cruz as Grandpa Munster as a young man.

    • highcourt

      lok at that face.. reptilian & positively vile
      he is in the pocket of big money.. anything he proposes?/ bec he got paid..

  • Question for the socialists here…..isn’t socialism a form of slavery?

    “Democracy extends the sphere of individual freedom, socialism restricts it. Democracy attaches all possible value to each man; socialism makes each man a mere agent, a mere number. Democracy and socialism have nothing in common but one word: equality. But notice the difference: while democracy seeks equality in liberty, socialism seeks equality in restraint and servitude.”

    ― Alexis de Tocqueville

    The left’s agenda is control through regulations and billions and billions of miles of red tape.

  • PatBryanTX2

    Re “gut decision: Humans do not make logical decisions. They might involve logic to eliminate the impossible. Maybe. All decisions are emotional decisions. Then Pretend Logic comes in, in the forms of Rationalization and Self Justification.
    Ted is reviled back home too.

    • roadgeek

      Which explains how he sent David Dewhurst packing.

      • highcourt

        that may soon change..

      • Indiana Pearl

        VRA irregularities in Texas made it possible.

        • roadgeek

          VRA irregularities really accounted for more than 150,000 votes? Please clarify your statement. I’d like to know more.

          • Indiana Pearl

            Dewhurst was on target to win the primary had it been held at the fixed time. Because the TX GOP egregiously gerrymandered, the primary was postponed. TX was forced to make adjustments because the VRA was still intact. The postponement permitted baggers to gin up support for Cruz.

            Booksie talks about this – and grandmas – a lot. I don’t about 150,000 votes.

    • Typical liberal thinking. You assume all people lie because you do.
      You assume all people cheat because you do.
      You assume all people steal because you do.
      You assume all people are emotional thinkers but science shows 50% lean toward emotional thinking with 16% being mostly or entirely emotional. This 16% on the left is commonly known as the left.
      The 16% on the right is mostly or entirely logical. They are known as the right.
      43% of American identify with the right and are known as conservatives. 19% of Americans identify with the left and are known as the kooks.
      The remaining 38% are known as “moderates” by some and “low information” by others. But they are right/left brain conflicted and confused.

      Don’t try this at home leave it to the experts.

  • roadgeek

    I like him, and even voted for him. I’d vote for him again, except he’s hopeless on the immigration question. He makes the right noises, but if Trump wasn’t driving that particular issue, the other candidates wouldn’t bring it up, Cruz included.
    It’s still unclear to whom the coveted American Renaissance endorsement will be given, however.

    • WUSRPH

      One of t
      Donald Trump’s Plan of how to deal with the 11 million illegal aliens.
      Donald Trump’s Plan of how to deal with the 11 million illegal
      aliens.

    • Unwound

      Anders Brevik.

      • WUSRPH

        experiment failed….back to the drawing board.

    • WUSRPH
  • Rules of Blazon

    Ted Cruz is an extremely bright, driven guy with very limited social skills. I think he’s probably sincere about his beliefs, and that makes him very popular among Texas tea-partiers.

    But because he is so smart, he must realize that he simply cannot win the presidency due to his extremism, making this run of his very self-serving, to say the least. I really can’t discern any strategic purpose to it beyond raising his already-high profile. It may be as simple as he’s an insatiable egomaniac who just can’t resist indulging himself at every possible opportunity.

  • enp1955

    We all know someone that believes they are always right, and are always vocal about that belief. They tend to preach and pontificate instead of converse. They are the boor at the party, and heaven help the innocent that accidentally offers an opinion not in line with that person’s perfect understanding of the issue.

    No doubt, you can see that person in your mind’s eye. In the Senate, that person is Ted Cruz. Socially, he would be a boor. In the Senate, he is annoying and ineffective. As president, he would be remarkably destructive.

  • John Johnson

    It would seem many posting here on Cruz simply don’t like him because of the way he looks.

  • Leroi

    Can’t you just see the oil dripping off Cruz.

  • Great points by all. It seems the left doesn’t like Cruz because he’s a lawyer who tells the truth as contrasted to democrat presidential candidate grandma Clinton who can’t tell the truth. She could not admit to a US House Committee that she lied. Misleading/lying to congress is a crime.

    “”Robert, that’s dodging,” Megyn countered. “I’m telling you, as a lawyer, this is an admission that is directly contrary to what she was representing to the families and to the public.”

    “That doesn’t change any of the facts,” Zimmerman said, reiterating his belief that it’s a partisan committee trying to smear Clinton.

    “It doesn’t change the facts. It only confirms that she knew facts different than the ones she was publicly representing,” Megyn said.”

    http://insider.foxnews.com/2015/10/22/megyn-kelly-and-hillary-clinton-supporter-robert-zimmerman-fact-check-hillarys-testimony

    Dems are always partisan and some definitely have trouble with facts, attack Cruz because of his looks and give Hillary a pass when caught in a blatant lie under oath before congress.

    Style vs substance the difference in parties.

    Cruz is charming, charismatic and truthful vs grandma Clinton’s dark soul.

    • Indiana Pearl

      Fat old guys hate grandmas.

  • donuthin2

    I think Pres Bush is right. For whatever reason, most detest him. He comes across as egotistical, arrogant and is just ugly. To some extent, Hillary Clinton has some of the same problem, that is, she lacks the warmth and charm that make people instinctively like her. She has far less of a problem than Cruz though. She was well prepared for the hearing yesterday and before that, for the debate.

    • Diane Sanchez

      I agree, the big difference is substance and character. Ted has neither! Embarrassed to say that he represents the State of Texas! We can do much better and deserve much better!

      • donuthin2

        I have been a moderate Republican for the last 40 years and would only consider voting for Jeb Bush for president and will vote for him in the primary, but otherwise will probably vote for Hillary. Bush hasn’t got much traction. I don’t think it is so much that he is disliked but rather that his kinda “blah”. In fact, I don’t think any of the Republican contenders are “liked” except maybe Carson.

  • Bodhisattva

    Likability is important. Obviously, we want to feel like a candidate generally matches our outlook on life and value system. But we also want to LIKE the person. Who would you want to have a pitcher of beer with? I think it’s Google that has a test for new hires: would you want to be stuck in an airport bar for six hours with them?

  • I would have a beer with Ted before I would be in the same room with grandma Clinton.

  • Some posting here actually believe the leftist propaganda put out about Sen Cruz.

    They also believe Hillary acted presidential when emails proved she was lying about the hideous acts in Benghazi that killed four Americans.

    “Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton brushed aside emails Thursday that showed she privately told family and world leaders that the 2012 attack on the U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi was a terrorist assault, and said Ambassador Christopher Stevens was responsible for his own decisions regarding skimpy security ahead of his death.”

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/oct/22/clinton-benghazi-hearing-gowdy-dead-deserve-truth/?page=all

    Ambassador Stevens sent 600 emails requesting more security.

    They also believe President Obama when he said our troops are not in combat in Iraq after Master Sgt. Joshua Wheeler killed by ISIS in Iraq.
    “WASHINGTON — Master Sgt. Joshua L. Wheeler was killed in combat Thursday, shot in a firefight with Islamic State forces in Iraq, though he wasn’t serving in a combat role, Secretary of Defense Ash Carter said Friday.”

    http://www.stripes.com/news/carter-soldier-died-in-combat-in-iraq-but-not-in-a-combat-role-1.374827

    Do you think we’re using Delta Team in Iraq as scout masters?

    How delusional are you people?

  • Cruz surges in Iowa…

    “Carson 28, Trump 20, Cruz 11”

    http://hotair.com/archives/2015/10/23/internal-poll-of-iowa-conducted-for-jindals-super-pac-carson-28-trump-20-cruz-11-rubio-9/

    Cruz reminds me of George Washington, he knows and respects the US Constitution and cannot tell a lie.

  • Cruz’s unfavorables average 34% as compared to Hillary’s 51%

    41% of U.S. adults say they have a favorable opinion of the Democratic front-runner, while 51% hold an unfavorable view.

    http://www.gallup.com/poll/185324/hillary-clinton-favorable-rating-one-worst.aspx

    While democrats danced in glee after Hillary lied to congress’ face, Cruz had to be smiling.

  • Happy Bennett

    Cruz is likeable and smart.

    • TrulyJulie

      Cruz is so intelligent that his intellect threatens many people.

      Retiring Harvard Law Professor and well-known liberal Alan Dershowitz says that Ted Cruz is “Off-the-charts brilliant. And you know, liberals make the terrible mistake, including some of my friends and colleagues, of thinking that all conservatives are dumb. And I think one of the reasons that conservatives have been beating liberals in the courts and in public debates is because we underestimate them. Never underestimate Ted Cruz. He is off-the-chart brilliant.”

  • Paul LeBon

    Why is Ted Cruz zo disliked? He and his father are world class liars and con men – read about them here https://youtu.be/Bf2p3mtye7U

  • Rob G

    Cruz is sleazy in a creepy, televangelist sort of way.
    How many times has he stared into a mirror and practiced that look of concern he musters.
    Not to mention he doesn’t answer a question. http://www.politico.com/story/2015/08/megyn-kelly-ted-cruz-immigration-question-121756