Longreads

See No Evil

Apr 30, 1993 By Skip Hollandsworth

Dallas police say Charles Albright is the coldest, most depraved killer of women in the city’s history. To me, he seems like a perfect gentleman. Maybe too perfect.

O Janis

Sep 30, 1992 By Robert Draper

Janis Joplin’s life was about music, rebellion, and excess—but she was influenced most by her tormented relationship with the people and spirit of Port Arthur.

The Killer Next Door

Apr 1, 1992 By Gayle Golden

For six years, my landlord and his wife were the perfect neighbors. Then he was accused of murdering her—and suddenly I didn’t know what to believe.

Poor Willie

Apr 30, 1991 By Robert Draper

When the IRS seized all that Willie Nelson had, it was a case of the man who can’t say no meeting the men who won’t take no for an answer.

The Greek Way

Mar 1, 1991 By Skip Hollandsworth

Are good times and fun pranks giving way to racial slurs and ritualized violence? An inside look at UT’s fraternity row.

Can’t Win for Losing

Nov 1, 1989 By Skip Hollandsworth

When San Antonio’s Memorial Minutemen took on a crosstown rival, all they had to lose was their chance to go down in history as Texas’ worst high school football team.

The Work of The Devil

May 31, 1989 By Gary Cartwright

The disappearance of a University of Texas student in Matamoros led police to the discovery of a drug-dealing cult whose rituals were not only unholy but unthinkable.

Poisoned With Love

Apr 30, 1989 By Gary Cartwright

They were elderly people, flattered by the attention of a nice young man. But sometimes it’s a mistake to depend on the kindness of strangers.

The Lost Tribe

Feb 1, 1989 By Stephen Harrigan

They were the classic Texas Indians—fierce, majestic, and free. Today’s Comanches find their lives defined by legends and bitter truths.

Trashy Business

Nov 1, 1984 By Alison Cook

When Houston’s rich and powerful join forces with environmentalists to battle big corporations, they can be fighting over only one thing. Garbarge.

Coppini the Great

Sep 30, 1984 By Stephen Harrigan

Pompeo Coppini’s heroic sculptures and European air were just what Texas’ fledgling gentry was hungry for in 1901. Since then his name has faded from memory, but his works endure.

The Man in the Black Hat, Part Two

Jun 30, 1984 By Paul Burka

With the help of a friendly banker and some friendlier politicians, Clinton Manges conquered might Mobil Oil and saved his empire. But not for long—it’s in jeopardy again.

The Man in the Black Hat

May 31, 1984 By Paul Burka

Clinton Manges built his empire on brushland and oil wells, political contributions and lawsuits. His influence extends to the state capitol and oil company boardrooms. To get where he is, he studied under three masters of South Texas.

The Big Con

Aug 31, 1983 By Byron Harris

From his early days in Big Spring, Eugene Anderson wasn’t what he seemed; neither was the mysterious element he later claimed turned water into fuel.

Charlie Brooks’ Last Words

Feb 1, 1983 By Dick Reavis

Charlie Brooks was the first man to die by lethal injection, but everyone wondered whether he or his partner was the real murderer. In his last days, Brooks answered that, and other questions.

Easy Street

Nov 1, 1982 By Lawrence Wright

Houston’s black elite have come a very long way to live in MacGregor Way, the swankiest black neighborhood in Texas, but they still don’t feel safe.

Mr. Hannah’s Rocket

Nov 1, 1982 By Stephen Harrigan

His first spacecraft blew up on the pad and his primary investor died, but the first free enterprise rocket finally flew from Matagorda.

Drinking

Mar 1, 1982 By John Graves

Saint Paul said that a little wine is a fine thing. He must have known something.

No Man’s Land

Dec 1, 1980 By Richard West

Welcome to Highland Park, a small town right in the middle of Dallas where the living is easy and time stands still.

The Throwdown

Jul 31, 1979 By Tom Curtis

Houston police said they shot Randy Webster because he pointed a gun at them. Randy’s father set out to prove they were lying.

The Birds of Death

Nov 1, 1978 By Giles Tippette

Cockfighting is probably cruel and certainly illegal, which are only two reasons that attract its aficionados.

Old Folks at Home

Nov 1, 1978 By Kaye Northcott

We will all grow old; but, as Maurice Chevalier says, “That’s not so bad when you consider the alternative.”

Ol’ Blue

Dec 1, 1977 By John Graves

A good country dog is loyal, obedient, and knows the difference between a chicken and a possum.

What’s Red, White, and Blue . . . And Orange All Over?

Sep 30, 1977 By William Martin

The Orange Show’s 75-year-old creator, Jeff McKissack, still goes dancing and is sure he will live to be a hundred. Never heard of the Orange Show? Then you’ve missed a razzle-dazzle piece of American folk art—an amusement park/sideshow that looks like a topless castle designed by a…