Contributors

Anne Dingus

Anne Dingus's Profile Photo

Anne Dingus was born and raised in Pampa and attended Rice University. After graduating in 1975, she worked as a journalist at NASA and in the oil industry. In 1978 she joined the staff of Texas Monthly, first as a fact-checker and then as a writer. She wrote on a variety of topics, particularly history, popular culture, and humor. Her 1994 article “More Texas Sayings Than You Can Shake a Stick At,” which contained 662 Texas rural expressions, was by far her most popular article and quickly became a book. Dingus left the magazine in 2005 after more than twenty years on staff.

284 Articles

Texas Primer |
July 31, 1999

Sharon Tate

On which two sitcoms did Sharon Tate have a guest-starring role?

Art |
July 31, 1999

Speed, Queen

Austin painter Julie Speed is the latest ascendant to the ranks of art royalty. Talk about a brush with greatness.

Travel & Outdoors |
June 30, 1999

What Is the Panhandle?

This much is plain: the Texas Panhandle is part of the High Plains. But what, exactly, is the Texas Panhandle? Folks have debated the issue for years. Historian Frederick Rathjen says the Panhandle is the state’s 26 northernmost counties. Others, such as author A. C. Greene, deem it rectangular,

Texas Primer |
May 31, 1999

Américo Paredes

Which Américo Paredes book was made into a movie starring Edward James Olmos?

Books |
March 1, 1999

Jim Dandy

Call it A Simpler Plan: Austinite Jim Magnuson’s new novel is about the consequences of finding a lot of money—and it’s a good read.

The Culture |
September 30, 1998

Leon’s Lens

In the Central Texas town of Seguin, Leon Kubala has been documenting life and death for more than fifty years, one picture at a time.

Sports |
June 30, 1998

Rogers Hornsby

BASEBALL’S ROGERS HORNSBY was a success right off the bat. In 1916, at age twenty, he became the leading hitter for the St. Louis Cardinals. His 1924 batting average of .424 is still the best of the modern era (and his lifetime .358 is second only to Ty Cobb’s .367).

Art |
June 30, 1998

War Games

In the suddenly trendy world of World War II wannabes, these Texans are big guns.

The Stand Up Desk |
May 31, 1998

Witt and Wisdom

BILL WITTLIFF IS A RENAISSANCE hombre. An author, a publisher, a film producer, and an arts patron, the longtime Austinite is best known for his screenplays, including The Black Stallion, Raggedy Man, Legends of the Fall, and Lonesome Dove; his adaptation of the latter revived both the miniseries and the

Film & TV |
May 31, 1998

Dove Shoot

Ten years after the filming of the miniseries Lonesome Dove, screenwriter Bill Wittliff shares his photographic memories of life on the set.

Being Texan |
April 30, 1998

The Newton Boys

UNTIL A STAR-STUDDED FILM SHOT THEM BACK into the spotlight, the Newton Boys had faded from public memory. Famous during the twenties, the four brothers—Jess, Willis (below left), Doc, and Joe (right)—were part Western desperadoes, part newfangled gangsters. They pulled off dozens of bank and train robberies but, unlike more-notorious

Film & TV |
March 1, 1998

Joan Crawford

All her life, Joan Crawford raised other people’s eyebrows as often as she reapplied her own. From the time she arrived in Hollywood, the temperamental Texan provoked hostility and gossip, and her wide-eyed flapper persona soon hardened into that of a sleek, steely sophisticate. But the arrogance accompanied a massive talent;

Art |
November 1, 1997

El Circo

As in Hanoi and Moscow, the circus in Mexico is no three-ring extravaganza. It’s one of the grittiest shows on earth.

Texas History |
July 31, 1997

Alamo Tome

This month Eakin Press will publish The Alamo Almanac and Book of Lists. Among the interesting items compiled by author William R. Chemerka is one that has nothing to do with history—not really, anyway: It’s the Top Twenty Most Frequently Asked Questions at the Alamo.1. “Where’s the bathroom?”2. “Is this

Texas History |
July 31, 1997

Judge Roy Bean

WEST OF THE PECOS THERE IS NO LAW; west of El Paso there is no God.” So went the saying in unsettled West Texas—until the day in 1882 when Roy Bean became a justice of the peace in dusty little Langtry, where the sign over the Jersey Lilly, his combination

Music |
April 1, 1997

Roy Orbison

What did Roy Orbison drink compulsively, and who called him the world’s greatest singer?

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