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Appetite for the Future

What will dining be like in decades to come? We asked the state’s top chefs and foodies.

By February 2008Comments

Listed below are the full answers from all the respondents who met the deadline.

Original spelling and grammar are retained.

1. The trendiest vegetable or grain in the next two years will be ________________?

(e.g., cauliflower, yucca, parsnips, sweet potato, lentils, farro, barley, black rice, collard greens—or your suggestion)

• Escarole — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston.
• Salsify—Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.
• Açai (berry of the açai palm—pronounced asa’i) — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas.
• Saisifis — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.
• Quinoa — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin.
• Quinoa— Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston.
• “Perfectly cooked, in season vegetables and in large varieties. I hope.” —Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston.
• “My current fave is shaved Brussels sprouts sautéed in brown better w/ s&p (a Robert Rhoades idea) — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• “Any vegetable whose provenance can be identified.” — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston.
• Beets — Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth.
• Fregola- although not a “grain” this Sardinian pasta pellet is interchangeable as a great versatile “starch replacement” — Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio
• any thing that hasn’t been genetically modified — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio.
• Seaweed — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas.
• What’s left? — Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin.
• vegetable colored quinoa — David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin.
• chickpea flourJohn Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.
• locally grown heirloom vegetables — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas.
• Black veggies & grains (soybeans/rice/carrots/tomato) — Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin.
• Rice — Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top.
• Edamame — Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• Quinoa — Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas.
• Wheat (it will be an alternative crop before long) — Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston.
• All vegetables that will be considered part of the ‘green’ movement. Environmentally safe grown vegetables. This will be an alternative to organic growth and will fit a wider audience. — Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio.
• Lentils — Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.
• Salsify — Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston.
• Not one in particular but a variety of fruits and vegetables indigenous to Mexico and Latin America such as lucuma, purple corn(chicha)and a rainbow of potatoes — Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas.
• Heirloom rice — Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston.
• Anything with “otto” at the end “ Farotto, Barotto” – Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls.
• Black rice/heritage or heirloom veggies — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin.
• Radishes — Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio.
• Celery root. Very underrated. — Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin.
• Cardoon — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.
• Shelling peas (lady creamers, speckled butter beans . . .). I think whatever is local and seasonal, people are going to become more concerned with what they put into their bodies, and how, what they buy effects the earth and the community. — Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.
• Organic leafy veggies, like kale and Chard. Quinoa — Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.
• A lot of those are already done and on their way out. I think quinoa is great and rainbow swiss chard (which we grow). — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.
• Bambo rice — Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston.
• Cooked hearty leafy greens. — Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.
• quinoa followed by lentils and root vegetables. — Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market
• Garlic Sweet Potato Fries- Why? Because the Ladies love them. — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas.
• Specialty potatoes and crosnes. — Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.
• Corn — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.
• More important than a specific vegetable or grain, will be the trend of chefs going more with sustainable agriculture. Chefs are buying more local and seasonal product, versus buying something year round with diminished quality and no concern of seasonality or where it comes from (other countries, hot house, etc.). — Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.
• Yuca. — Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.
• Asian Black Rice and Italian Black Rice — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.
• Humble root vegetables. — Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas.
• black anything — limes, carrots, rice — Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.
• Black barley — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.
• Curly mustards — Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

2. In two years the next big protein will be ________________? (e.g., kurobuta pork, Akaushi beef, rabbit, calamari steaks, tofu, buffalo, guinea hen, ahi tuna, pork belly, quail eggs—or your suggestion)

• Grass Fed Beef — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston.
• Milk-fed pork—Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.
• Prime Veal — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas.
• Akaushi — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.
• Farmed kona kampachi — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin.
• Organic beef or buffalo tenderloin — Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston.
• “Underutilized gulf fish (things other than snapper and shrimp)” — Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston.
• “Local — grass fed/natural razing procedures will play an important role. The real challenge will be to find suppliers/ranchers/processors who can supply quantity and quality. Bandera Grassland and Betsy Ross or her style will be players… natural raised — local wild game will also see a new life. This all depends on the diner’s knowledge of the health benefits and the environmental benefits. Kurobuta pork & Akaushi beef are really just Japanese raising styles that can be done here. Look for pork belly to be the next foie gras.” — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• South Texas Lamb — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston
• Grass fed beef (folks are going green) — Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth.
• Texas Shrimp. Natural shrimp from LaCoste Texas is changing the way we think about locally produced farm raised shrimp. Great product, locally sourced and fresh. What more would any chef want? — Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio
• beef as it is every year — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio.
• Goat — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas.
• Beef, now and forever — Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin.
• hormone free top sirloin — David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin.
• guinea henJohn Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.
• Kona compachi from Hawaii — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas.
• Wild board/farm raised chicken (not cafo) — Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin.
• Pork — Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top.
• all natural and grass-fed beef — Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• Source verified beef — Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas.
• Dry aged beef — Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston.
• Cheese and red meat. We will see a resurgence to classic style cuisine done in a modern cutting edge way, because of the economy and election people will go back to what they know and makes them feel good. — Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio.
• Pig definitely pig. — Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.
• Offal. Everything goes in circles. — Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston.
• No answer — Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas.
• Heritage breed pork, Yorkshire, durac — Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston.
• Grass fed, Humanely dispatched & Sustainable (Hopefully) — Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls.
• Functional foods. Protein replacement — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin.
• Buffalo — Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio.
• Akaushi beef. — Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin.
• Chicken from Bresse France — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.
• Fish: black cod, kona kampachi…I think diners are beginning to eat fish with oil content for both health reasons and for the bigger flavor. — Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.
• Locally farm poultry (Not chicken—hens guinea hens, peasants etc.). — Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.
• This one depends on where you are and what style. Tofu is gaining momentum and Ahi Tuna is going way out and is way over priced and most is really frozen. Rabbit is awesome I do a lot of game but I wouldn’t be surprised if people brought a real chicken dish back into play (I did). — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.
• Akaushi — Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston.
• Beef steaks with a point of origin. — Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.
• the more exotic, lesser known fish such as Wahoo, Escolar, Branzino, etc. Organ meats are also gaining acceptance as are eggs from sources other than chicken. — Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market
• Watch for a continued movement towards “Eco-Friendly” aquaculture products. Green is the new black. — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas.
• Artisanal pork. — Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.
• Farm Raised Shrimp, Bison Buffalo or Hormone-free pork — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.
• Beef (teres major, flat iron, hanger steak), Kurobuta pork (belly and other cuts). — Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.
• More beef! — Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.
• Akaushi Beef, Fish Fish and more Fish — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.
• Organic Beef — Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas.
• lamb, particularly alternative cuts like lamb neck and lamb bellies — Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.
• Buffalo — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.
• Akaushi beef — Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

3. The hottest Texas chef of 2010 will be _______________?

• The next guy that opens a 5 night, forty seater and mans the stove himself with one other guy and that’s it — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston.
• Christopher Aeby, Café Aeby, Corpus Christi—John Campbell, Central Market
• Marco Wiles, Da Marco, Houston—Charles Butt, H-E-B
• Tyson Cole or Patrick Edwards — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.
• Paul Qui of Uchi — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin.
• Charles Clark— Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston.
• Brendon Treanor—Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston.
• Robert Rhoades & Tyson Cole — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• Someone none of us has heard of. — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston
• I’d like to say me, but Dean Fearing is riding a well earned wave right now. — Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth.
• Boy, I would love to throw my name into that hat, but will resist. I think that both Andrew Weissman and Anthony Bombaci are going to explode and become household names. — Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio
• still be Andrew Weisman — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio.
• Stephen Pyles — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas.
• I don’t know, but there will be plenty of candidates and that is a good thing — Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin.
• he hasn’t arrived to Texas yet. — David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin.
• chef of The Mansion John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.
• Casey Thompson and Joel Harrington — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas.
• A woman (who is slaving somewhere as a line cook right now) — Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin.
• No answer — Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top.
• Robert Rhoades J — Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• Abraham Salum — Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas.
• Scott Tycer — Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston.
• That depends on what you mean by hot!!!!! Good looking or great talent!!!!! I vote for the next generation of chefs coming from my team, Scott Cohens, Dean Ferrings team, Stephen Pyles team, Andrew Weissmans team, Bruce Audens team, etc… – Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio.
• I don’t know who’s hot now. — Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.
• Me, I hope!!!! — Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston.
• Who knows — Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas.
• Somebody new — Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston.
• Bryce Gilmore, (Jack Gilmore’s son, he’s my recent sous chef, He’s at Boulevard in San Fran now. The Chef du Cuisine was a line cook of mine in Santa Fe. — Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls.
• We have not seen them yet!! — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin.
• Andrew Weissman — Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio.
• Still Tyson Cole — Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin.
• Whomever the media anoints — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.
• Besides ME!…Trey Wilcox — Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.
• No answer — Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.
• Paul Petersen — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.
• A Hispanic from the new CIA in San Antonio. — Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston.
• A totally unknown. — Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.
• from this group: Paul Petersen (Gage Hotel, Marathon), Tyson Cole (Uchi, Austin), Andrew Weisman (LaReve, SA), Anita Jaisighani (Indika, Houston), Tre Wilcox (Abacus, Dallas), Ryan Pera (17 in the Alden Hotel, Houston), Sharon Hage (York Street, Dallas). Or, more likely someone hiding in the shadows of these names! — Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market
• Sweating profusely I suppose. Too hard to forecast and who is that now? — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas.
• The one who embraces local, sustainable and slow food principles. — Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.
• Tre Wilcox — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.
• No answer. — Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.
• A woman. — Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.
• Olivier Cielieski — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.
• Trick question. — Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas.
• whoever’s the smartest and most talented — Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.
• Jose Jela, Houston — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.
• Who knows? — Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

4. The current restaurant fad most likely to fade is ________________?

(e.g., truffle oil, exotic salts, mac & cheese, shrimp & grits, chocolate lava cake—or your suggestion)

• Obscenely Huge Portions and using a 10th grade chemistry set to try and prove something — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston.
• Organic food—Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.
• Molecular gastronomy — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas.
• Foam-mash potatoes under the food — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.
• Nicoise salads — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin.
• Foie gras and sea salts — Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston.
• Instructional eating — Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston.
• “Exotic salts — while I firmly believe in sea salt — pure & flaky are much more important. I had nine different salts at Per Se with beef… they were all very similar.” — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• Sous vide and most other cooking techniques that move cooking away from hearth and into lab. — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston
• Carnival food i.e. Corndogs, popsicles, lollipops, funnel cakes, etc. and hopefully (dear God, please) those foam sauces (to me they look like spit). — Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth.
• All of the above fit that description. I also think that foams are on their last leg..or bubble…… – Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio
• hopefully anything that is truly just a fad — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio.
• Celebrity chefs — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas.
• Disneyesque restaurant design and it is about time — Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin.
• salts and waters — David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin.
• all of the examples listed (except salt)John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.
• Steakhouses — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas.
• Molecular gastronomy/micro greens garnishes — Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin.
• Miniature veggies — Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top.
• mixed baby vegetables — Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• Truffle oil — Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas.
• Exotic salts — Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston.
• Less chains more real large independently own concepts — Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio.
• “Over production” meaning either to much food on the plate and ingredients being over worked. Simplicity is the fad of the future. — Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.
• Molecular gastronomy — Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston.
• Foams — Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas.
• Please let it be truffle oil — Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston.
• Indifferent Service — Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls.
• Foams/molecular gastronomy — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin.
• Japanese — Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio.
• Shrimp & grits — Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin.
• No answer — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.
• Small desserts, dessert is means to be decadent. — Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.
• Foams. — Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.
• All of those are out except for truffle oil (when used right) but what is really going to disappear are water sommeliers, way too fancy flatware, deconstructed cuisine and sci-fi nonsense. — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.
• Lava cake — Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston.
• Sushi in any restaurant except a Japanese restaurant. — Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.
• overpriced comfort foods. — Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market
• Truffle oil is badly over-used. So it is already over. Exotic salts have limited appeal, are expensive and are poorly used. Give me Exotic Salts……When the equity in your home is gone, the economy is tanking, and things look bleak, I’ll take the comfort of Mac n’ Cheese, Shrimp & Grits and super gooey Chocolate Cake to the bank seven days from Sunday. — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas.
• Molecular gastronomy. — Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.
• Foam — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.
• Foie gras — Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.
• Rudeness — Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.
• South American food — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.
• molecular / chemical cooking — Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas.
• foams/exotic salts/truffle oil — Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.
• All of the below — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.
• Truffle oil (or foams) — Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

5. The appetizer of the future is _______________?

• Gourmet Sliders — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston.
• Domestic caviar—Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.
• Wraps-with anything but tortillas (rice paper/nori/lettuce/cabbage — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas.
• More Asian influence: sashimis, sushis, tartars, rare seared — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.
• New variations on spring rolls and lettuce wraps — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin.
• Sashimi — Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston.
• Jumbo lump lollipops; they are large pieces of fresh jumbo lump with the swimmer fin still attached — Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston.
• No answer — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• No answer — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston
• Eco-friendly — Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth.
• Italian Crudo…..time to wake up Texas and eat some raw fish not called sushi — Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio
• can’t even think of anything funny here — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio.
• Liquid — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas.
• Street food simple so that people can relax at the beginning of a meal — Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin.
• retro home cooking ideas put into apps — David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin.
• unpredictable (with freshness and creativity a must!)John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.
• Raw Fish — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas.
• Foie gras (I wish) — fried vegetables or various cured fish/seafoods — Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin.
• Tapas menu — Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top.
• lettuce wraps — Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• My Crab Cakes! — Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas.
• A composed dish — Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston.
• Raw bar items, love raw bar items!!!! — Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio.
• Something oozing, with savory and sweet components, warm center with a cold element and some crunch — Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.
• Crispy Fried Lambs tongue — Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston.
• Hispanic appetizers such as ceviche and Peruvian causas — Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas.
• Wait and see — Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston.
• Foie Gras with Oatmeal (I can prepare it for you sometime) — Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls.
• Dim sum, lumpid, spring rolls, egg rolls — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin.
• No answer — Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio.
• Something fried — Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin.
• Liquid — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.
• Offal, organ meats, sweet breads, pigs feet, “other meats.” — Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.
• Small plates of shellfish and game, seared rare and spicy. — Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.
• Braised Lamb Leg Risotto with Slow Roast Tomatoes and Parsley, Oh wait a minute I already do that one. Poached and Chilled Chicken Ballontine with Braised Quince and Grilled Bread. — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.
• Vegetable and fruit as a first course — Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston.
• No answer — Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.
• something made with fruit. — Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market
• Simple & Salty. The best ones always are. — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas.
• Anything utilizing seasonally appropriate products. — Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.
• a small version of what could be an entrée — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.
• Housemade charcuteries and salamis (Copa, house cured sausages, prosciutto) — Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.
• Ceviche — Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.
• raw fish, prepared any style — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.
• Simple and light, oyster, smoked salmon — Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas.
• tempura quail eggs — Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.
• In my head somewhere. — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.
• Fresh — anything artizan (?) (?? Cheese) — Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

6. The next global cuisine craze will be __________________? (e.g., Peruvian, Argentinean, Portuguese, Spanish, Indian, Greek—or your suggestion)

• I don’t want to see the word Global and Cuisine next to each other anymore in any form or any reason. I think folks are running out of ideas to hopefully ‘sell it’ to a customer that is inundated with more choices then they really need — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston.
• Classic French—Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.
• Authentic Mexican Cuisine — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas.
• Ultra quality, i.e. Kobe, expensive poultry, high grade foods — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.
• French-Vietnamese — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin.
• Moroccan—Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston.
• Texan- lets try and define it. This state encompasses many different cultures, environments, products, traditions and talents. New American is not hard to understand why not new Texan—Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston.
• “Again I believe the next craze will be Texas Chefs ability to market and of course produce tasteful regional/local/sustainable foods… this again depends on a public that becomes informed/aware/caring.” — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• Pakistan/Indian — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston
• Peruvian and Thai — Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth.
• Chinese………..after the Bejing Olympics I think that there will be a resurgence of Chinese fare. Hopefully traditional, hand made dim sum, hot wok seared and lacking of “sweet and sour pork” — Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio
• Overdone — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio.
• Non-Global…each cuisine re-discovering its roots — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas.
• Global: how do we define local anymore? That which is available here and now or that which can be planted here and harvested but is a traditional crop somewhere else? — Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin.
• Balynese — David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin.
• quality and honestyJohn Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.
• Indian — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas.
• Cuisines from Syria & Morocco — Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin.
• Indian — Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top.
• Vietnamese — Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.
• Indian — Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas.
• American — Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston.
• Back to the French watch you will see, we have forgotten that all the cuisines you mentioned have French influences. The French influence cuisine all over the world. As I have been in Spain, Argentina, I can tell you first hand that the French way of cooking is the fundamental foundation to all new up and coming influences and the respect for the French technique has never been more than now and in the future. Watch for new resurgence. — Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio.
• Portuguese or Middle Eastern — Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.
• Dalmatian coast — Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston.
• Indian and endless fusions of it, although Arabic will be big too — Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas.
• Spanish and Malaysian — Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston.
• Modern German, there are things going on in Germany that you saw in Spain 10 years ago. Die Jungen Wilden kochen (Taschenbuch)
• Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls.
• Global cuisines. Not a specific country or culture but the interest and support of all ethnic and global cuisines is the trend I see. — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin.
• South American — Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio.
• Argentinean — Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin.
• Mediterranean — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.
• English: Gastro Pubs. — Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.
• Local flavors that represent the individuality of the place, and the personal experience it represents — Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.
• Real Spain no question about it. — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.
• Greek — Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston.
• A Latin American country. — Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.
• North African, mainly Moroccan and Tunisian followed by Middle Eastern or perhaps a new fusion involving Indian cuisine.Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market
• Indian — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas.
• Anything from Africa. — Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.
• Argentinean…South American type of food — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.
• Southern Mediterranean — Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.
• Peruvian and Spanish. — Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.
• Modern Asian — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.
• South east asian — Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas.
• Peruvian — Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.
• Italian pizza, Panini — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.
• Peruvian — Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

Multiple choice

7. In five years, diners in Texas restaurants will think which of these sauces and/or dressings are so last century?

a. chimichurri — “Gone, or should be.” Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top. Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas (Vinaigrette with Maytag Blue crumbles is a classic flavor combo. Maytag may be a little shop-worn so look for the Micro blues to appear more and more. Spicy and smoky in Texas is always in vogue). Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.

b. vinaigrette with Maytag blue cheese crumbles — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin. Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio. Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston. Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston. Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio. Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas. Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

c. chipotle anything — Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.

David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas. Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston. Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth (or pomegranate anything). Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas. Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin (Please, God, no more). David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin. Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin. Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin (I think Texas will continue to experiment with other chiles, though). Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas. Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston. Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio. Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio. Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin. Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio. Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.

d. all of the aboveLance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston. John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas. Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin (hopefully). Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston. Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas. Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston. Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls. William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin. Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin. Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas. Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon. Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin. Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market (plus blue cheese mayo dressing on iceberg lettuce). Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston. Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas. Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth. John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.

e. none of the above — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio (most diners (other than foodies)will not have had their fill of them in five years). Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas. Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston (maybe they are all destined to become new classics).

The three have been already that for a while … in 5 years, they may be close to comeback — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.

All of the above used in the wrong places, you need these sauces in the right venues. Example: Michael Corda needs chimichurri — Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.

No answer—Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston. Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston.

8. In ten years, Texans will eat their evening meal at home how many times a week?

a. 7 — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.

b. 5 — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio. Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top. William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin. Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market (With the diversity in “almost” ready- to-eat meals and the longing to recapture the specialness of the kitchen, Texans will be eating most dinner meals at home.) Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston. Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.

c. 3 — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston. —Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.

David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas. Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio. Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin. Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston. Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston. — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston. Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth. Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio. Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin (That will be as many as the kids can take). David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin. John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas. Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin. Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas. Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston. Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio. Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston. Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas. Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston. Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls. Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio. Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin. Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston. Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston. Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin. Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio. Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas. Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston. Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas. Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth. Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

d. 0 — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas. Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas. Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.

e. 4 — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.

I would say 6 because they will be tired of Chili’s and family tables will make a come back and they will really only go out to eat at real restaurant’s. — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.

Hard to say…kids no kids? — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas

No answer – Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.

9. The trendiest Texas restaurants five years from now will be in which of these Texas cities?

a. Houston—Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston. Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston. David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin. Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top. Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston. Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston. Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston (Houston has so many new restaurants with young daring chefs that in five years many of them will be trendy). Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin. Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston. Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston. Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston. John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.

b. San Antonio — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas. Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio (watch out we’re comin for you all!!!!!!). Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio (of course!). Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas. Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston. Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.

c. Austin — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston. Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin. — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas. Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin (Of course!). Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin. Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston. William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin. Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin. Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin. Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.

d. Dallas — Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas. Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio (has been the city for trendy places for a long time. They don’t last, so there is always room for new ones.) Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston. Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio (Dallas….are you kidding me? Dallas is on fire and has far surpassed any other Texas city in this respect. The young money is making Dallas a bona fide Metropolitan area. San Antonio is still 8-10 years away from “trendy”). John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas. Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas. Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas. Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston. Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas. Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls (though he writes: Dallas will always be trying to be New York, and always 5 years behind. Trendy in a bad way.) Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin. Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas (of course). Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas. Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas (of course!). Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth (Dallas and Fort Worth).

e. _____________ (other—your choice) Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth (Fort Worth of course). Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio (a rural setting). David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin. Charles Butt, H-E-B (It will be a horse race — too close to call!) Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg (Fredericksburg (Hill Country)).

No answer: Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.

The outskirt cities of the big cities are going to gain attention if there is enough business to support it and the food is worth the drive ;). — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.

True/False

10. Beef is on the wane.

True — Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas. David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin. Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin. Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon. Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas (Great beef has become soooo expensive)

False — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston. David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas. Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio (only that steakhouses need to modernize and reinvent their menus and style). Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin. Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston. Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston. — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth (Never). Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio (FALSE with a capital F). Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio. Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas. Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin. John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas. Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas. Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin (unfortunately). Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top. Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin (People will start to demand all natural beef, raised with no antibiotics or growth hormones). Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas. Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston. Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston (at least in Texas). Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas (No way). Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston (unfortunately false). Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls. William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin. Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio (Not in Texas). Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin. Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas. Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston. Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston. Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin. Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market (Never in Texas!). Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio. Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas. Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston. Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston. Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston. Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas. Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth. John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston. Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

No answer — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston. Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio. Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.

11. Carbs are coming back.

True — Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas. Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston. David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas. Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio. Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston. Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston. Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth (already back). Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio (True, but did they ever go away except in print media?). Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio. Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas. David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin. John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas (but they never really left). Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas. Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin (really never left). Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top. Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas. Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston. Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio. Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin (Were they ever really gone?). Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin (Did they ever really leave?). Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas (Thank God, Yes!). Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston. Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls. Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio (They are too delicious!). Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin. Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas. Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston. Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon (Amen). Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston. Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin (but only complex carbs). Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market (Did they ever really leave?). Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas (Not expensive…good bread is chefy and feels so safe…big comeback). Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio. Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas. Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston. Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston. Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas. Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth. John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston. Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

False — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin (they were always here, just in the closet). Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston. — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston (Being more conscious of your diet should not be a fad). Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.

No answer — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin. Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.

12. By 2010, every dish in the majority of restaurants will contain at least one genetically modified ingredient.

True — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston. Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin. Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston. Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth (For sure). Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio. Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas. Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin (They already do). David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin. Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas (Not Fearing’s though). Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top (already do). Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas. Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston (already does. Look at nourishment for the proteins!). Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin (Unfortunately). Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston (unfortunately true). Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls (I wish it was False). William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin. Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin. Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas. Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston (Could happen). Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market. Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas (Majority? Yes.). Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio. Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas. Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston. John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.

False — Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas. David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas (I hope not). Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio. Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston. Bryan Caswell: Reef , Houston. Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio (There will be a backlash by December 31st, 2009, and we will all wake up and realize we want REAL food again…). Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin (I sincerely hope not. If so, I bet it will not be to our knowing due to the FDA finding a way to keep it from being obviously labeled). Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin (Texans will become increasingly aware of what is in their food). Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio (hope not). Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston (At least not in the next 3 years. The relationship between kitchens and local farmers will only improve). Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas. Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio. Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston. Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin. Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston. Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston. Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas. Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth. Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

I hope false. — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.

Chains True, But hopefully chef’s like me will keep that happening in the real restaurants of Texas. — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.

Not in my restaurant! — John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.

“Chains only… where bottom line is the most important.” — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.

No Answer: Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.

13. By 2015, ninety percent of our meals will be eaten in chain restaurants.

True — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston. Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth (Sadly, probably so. Wait, Texas is 90% chain owned now, so probably 95% by then). Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas. David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin. Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top. Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin (Unfortunate also). Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls (Sadly, true). William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin. Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin (Unfortunately is true). Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

False — Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas. David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas (I hope not). Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio. Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin. Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston. Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston. — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston. Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio (They will all be out of business when we wake up and realize we don’t really like them…). Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio. Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin. Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas. Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin (I think the generations coming up have a food awareness & appreciation — and will desire more than what chains can offer. Plus I think that dining out will continue to be an experience and not just place to eat). Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin (I hope not). Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas. Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston (emphatically!!). Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio (false, false, false). Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston (hopefully false, but define a chain). Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas (I certainly hope not). Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston. Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio. Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin. Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas. Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston. Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston. Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market (No way!). Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas (90%? No way!). Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio. Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston. Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston. Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas. Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth. John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.

I hope not! — John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.

I hope not they are evil. — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.

I hope not. — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.

I really hope false. — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.

No answer: Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.

14. By 2020 Texas’s wines will rival California’s.

True — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas (I hope so). Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston (Don’t they already?). — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston. Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth (Yes!). Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas. Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas. Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio. Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston. Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls (California produces a lot of below average wines, so I guess it is True now, but we all ready have some that can stand up to them now). Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio (If California’s taxes continue to rise this may happen). Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston. Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

False — Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas. Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston. Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio. Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin. Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston. Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio (Hmmmmm. No……not quite, we gotta crawl before we can walk.). Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio (wish I could say True but farming is just tougher in Texas.) Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin. David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin. John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas. Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas. Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin (Maybe if Texan winemakers would actually grow varietals conducive to our climate & soil (and not base it on what varietals are most popular to consumers). Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top. Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston (Will never happen unless Nebraska and Kansas grow some tall trees. Temperature gradient is huge in Texas where as in California it is much less a factor). Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin. Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston (Unless the climate changes). Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas (Unfortunately not that early, but eventually). William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin. Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin. Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas. Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston. Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon (I am sorry but impossible). Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston (could rival Virginia). Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin. Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market (Texas will be producing some outstanding wines but will not rival California in range of varietals and blends. Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas (Not so fast Texas vintners). Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio. Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas. Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston. Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston. Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas. Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth. John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.

No answer: Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.

15. By 2025 Texas’s olive oils will rival Italy’s.

True — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas. Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston (Jack Daugherty in Wimberley, Texas, makes some good stuff). Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio (wow, that would be great and I own al little part of this movement, hopefully true). Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls (Italy — True, Spain — False). Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston. Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin (Good possibility). Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston (Spain’s actually). John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston. Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

False — Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas. Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston. David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas (Umm?? Not sure about that one.). Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio. Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin. Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston. Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston. — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin. Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth (Probably not). Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio (Hmmmmm…..I just laughed out loud……..Let’s make it 2055.). Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio (again I wish it was true but the fact that we will get deep freezes again will slow down this industry). Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas. Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin. John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas. Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin (But — I think if someone was serious about it — olive trees in Texas could produce a very decent product). Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top. Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas. Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin. Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston. Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas (No, but it will be quite respected). Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston. William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin. Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio. Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin. Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas. Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon (Way false). Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston. Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market (Texas climate precludes this from happening. We can’t grow good truffles either!). Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas (Focus on California’s cult oils first). Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio. Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas. Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston (but we will see what the future holds). Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas. Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.

No answer — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston. David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin. Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin. Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.

Short answer—express yourself; feel free to wax eloquent

16. What do you see as the most significant development in fine dining over the next two years?

More Chef Owned/Chef ‘Concepted’ and Chef run and smaller in size and scope..on the bad side there will be a ton of highly designed places started by people that are brand spanking new to the business and don’t understand how difficult it is…which will see a lot of bigger named Chefs doing ‘consulting.’ — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston.

The diner’s awareness to spend more on quality ingredients. —Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.

Healthy fast food — there is a demand for fast & healthy choices — Today life is running faster than ever and the health craze is here to stay. Eventually these two worlds will collide in the high end markets and be common place to get your seared ahi tuna salad with arugula through a pick up window.

For fine dining I think the trends will lean more towards chef interactive restaurants and combined service. The line between Front and back of the house will become incorporated and customers will feel more like they are coming into the chef’s home. — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas.

A return to simplicity — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.

Superstar celebrity chefs are branching out all over America in a continuation of branding names and cuisine; this in turn will effect many various markets and force local restaurateurs to up the bar and put out a better and more consistence product to compete. Smaller plates and portions will allow diners to enjoy a wider variety of items in one meal, playing to the modern American’s aesthetic of instant gratifications, ADD, and a continual wide array of choices in their lives. The days of app, entrée, dessert are done. — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin.

Better wine list and local ingredients (organic).

—Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston.

I believe that due to the rapidly rising cost of doing business that many of the old standards are associated with fine dining (high thread count linens, high end china, crystal and flat ware and outrageous build out) will start to vanish and unique ideas in service will replace them. Restaurant owners will focus more on the service and food to distinguish themselves. — Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston.

“16 and 17 are rolled together in this answer. The expense involved in an independent to open a restaurant is beyond belief. The only way is a very small, pre-owned location (Le Rêve). The only thing wrong with this is one has to create enough revenue to stay alive while being chained to the kitchen stove and attempt to not get burned out. The owner (the chef) must be tenacious and believe in his concept to stick it out. It takes a young, strong, savvy person. Start-ups are a young person’s game. Savvy and a business smarts are a learned attribute very few have these at a young age. A few young, bright chefs or restaurant professionals get funded by other when the excitement and romance off they realize they only own 5% and would be better off working for “the man”. Quality — passionate operators are more interested in the total experience then on the bottom line. It is a dance to stay alive while delivering a first class experience. — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.

A continued move toward fine ingredients and quality craftsmanship in a more relaxed and convivial environment. — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston.

Diners are becoming more educated every day and can dissect professional dishes easily. Keeping up with true foodies will be required of any chef who wants to stay on top. Many diners can now see through shortcuts and simple dishes, and expect more complexity and unique approaches to fine dining dishes. Diners are more educated than ever before, and have higher expectations, so we have to stay on our toes. — Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth.

Service, Service and Service……….with the continued growth of this segment, focusing on retaining great employees and nurturing a service oriented culture will be imperative. — Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio

depends on the economy, if good the fine dining will tend to get too snobby. — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio.

Specialization — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas.

Less available capital and more available talent will mean more shoestring and interesting restaurants tied to neighborhoods and basic good cooking. — Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin.

How to protect sustainability — David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin.

Honesty, quality and hard work.John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.

Casual, Refined Dining — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas.

Less formal pomp & circumstance. Skip the white tablecloths, tuxedoed servers & tired service structure & hush dining rooms. Focus on exceptional food (that focus on the food and not a decoration of the food) — and service. Informed servers (one per table) who bond (just barely) with the customer (no name telling) enough to read the table to ensure the best possible experience “for that table” — each server is thoroughly informed on food & wine. Wine should be on every table — and not only bottles of $50 and over. Down with boutique wine only. Dining rooms will actually have enough light so customers can read the menus yet still moody & ambient. Down with entrees over $35! Please — it’s just food (caviar — foie & truffles extra) — Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin.

more knowledgeable diners will explore lesser known ethnic cuisines, lesser known (and less expensive) wine varietals, cocktails made with freshly squeezed juices, herb infusions (bar chef) — Hugo Ortega: Hugo’s, Houston.

increasing menu cost and pricing. the challenge of serving menu items that have flavor that is not masked in the presentation and are items that have a price value relationship. — Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top.

More restaurants going to sustainable and green approaches — Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.

The growing presence of farm-to-restaurant. We as chef’s need to be more conscience of our impact on the environment — Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas.

For Texas, the mainstreaming of Sous Vide tech — Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston.

Fine dining will be disguised in chef driven casual upscale less expensive restaurants with the biggest talented chefs running them!!!! — Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio.

I see fine dining being the catalyst for us all to rediscover simplicity. As we create better cooks and chefs, and learn more about the products we use, the people responsible for those products and the passion that goes into producing these products we acquire respect. With this respect we appreciate the product for what they are and learn minimalism, we learn to let the true nature of the ingredient be the beauty in the dish. —Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.

Honestly this is a difficult one to answer. Having worked in Michelin star restaurants, local 4 star restaurants and upscale casual dinning, the concept of fine dinning is an evolutional one. The standards of casual restaurants are on the rise, challenging the “Fine dinning” establishments — Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston.

Menus becoming more refined, complex (not complicated) and well-executed while service becomes more approachable (and comfortable) and the atmosphere more stimulating. A word that is over-used but descriptive non-the-less — “experiential”. — Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas.

People knowing their farmers — Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston.

More and more chefs will begin to see that good food is just that, good food. Fine dining will become more accessible to everyone; a good chef can produce fine food at any price point. Give me an oxtail and I’ll give you a good meal, but then the distributors will see a trend and raise the prices. Because of high prices you will see more chefs doing “whole animal” purchased directly from the farm. — Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls.

Labor shortages will create the need for a paradigm shift. Those who understand that will make the necessary adjustments, and those who do not will ultimately fail. — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin.

I believe there will be much more training involved for the staff. They will educate their employees on absolutely everything related to their restaurant and dining experience. —Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio.

Local grown; more organic — Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin.

Major decline. Fine dining will disappear in Dallas because it’s all about the scene here and not the food. — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.

That the intimidation of fine dining is gone. Most of us have relaxed our dress codes and the food network along with other outlets has educated our customers so that they feel just as at home with us in a white table cloth setting as they do in a more casual setting. — Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.

Maintaining the identity, quality and value of the ingredients. Fresh, beautiful, lean healthful foods, that create personal experiences and human relationships. — Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.

I think the most significant thing in fine dining will be bringing real food back and leaving the crazy stuff behind. Some of it works but most of it is trying too hard to be weird and so called innovative. Truth of the matter is, it is only food not rocket science and it is kind of hard to reinvent the wheel every ten, twelve years. People like what they can pronounce. — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.

Table side service, making a come back in the dining room, guest spending more time dining and not so rushed. — Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston.

Service and ambience will become more approachable and inclusive as restaurants vie for dinning dollars. High overheads (labor and fine dinning table top costs) of operating fine dinning restaurants will push a lot of operators into casual fine dinning. With the average American continuing to increase the amount of times they dine out on a weekly basis, they will begin to trade down from frequency of fine dinning over the course of the month. — Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.

Superb food, excellent wine, and impeccable service in a relaxed atmosphere is the future of fine dining in Texas. — Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market

The relaxing of the experience. — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas.

Forward thinking on the part of chefs and owners concerning our impact (Foot print) on the planet, Also insuring continuing support of locally grown and sustainable products. — Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.

Fine Dining is definitely going to become less serious and what we think of fine dining now is going to change and become more casual and more fun because people will no longer want or have time for three and four hour culinary experiences. — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.

Restaurants will be more casual. Smaller (100-seat), chef-driven restaurants will be popular. More restaurants are developing in rejuvenated urban areas, such as Houston’s Midtown area. — Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.

The continue democratization of the exclusive service for the homogeneous country club crowd to reflect a more richly diverse and cosmopolitan wealth base — Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.

I think that there will be more competition for the fine dining dollar in the future. — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.

A return to simplicity is what I see coming. I think if you want to be running ahead of the pack you three words, simple, wholesome, flavorful. — Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas.

I think everything’s going to shrink, whether it’s dining room or portion size. There’s a time and place for big restaurants, and I even have a couple, but I think we’re looking at a return to smaller, more intimate restaurants where you don’t have to yell to be heard and you don’t have to run ten miles the next day to work off your appetizer. — Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.

No answer. — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.

Moving toward sustainable practices. Eating locally and seasonally. — Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

Trend: Bar Dining in Fine Restaurants. Once just a holding area, the bar has become the heart beat of a restaurant. A decade ago, you thought you were a pariah if you were escorted to eat in the bar (except of course for the avant-garde & the ultra cool). Now people fight for tables in the bar. The trend is nothing more than a mirror of the times — people are drawn to where the laughter is.

A big trend in fine dining is the trend away from traditional fine dining. Fine dining is too quickly handcuffed to the confines of formality. [Someone recently told me — to be label a special occasion restaurant is the kiss of death. Where do you generally see men all formally dressed in coat & tie? — at a funeral.] Great food (simple & not over manipulated), great wine & fun — that’s now the chant of today’s diner. Fine dining restaurants of the future will prefer to be called “Fine Informal” or “Fine Casual”. —

Robert Del Grande: Café Annie, Houston.

17. Are independently owned restaurants an endangered species? What will we miss most when all restaurants are operated by corporations?

Yes, rents are getting outrageous. Investors expect 1.5 year paybacks, and these owners aren’t hands on enough. We will miss having the little guy remember who you are, your favorite wine..oh and waiting an hour to get a table because they don’t take reservations. Lastly, most consumers don’t really care either way…they just want to eat and will settle on average and below to save a few bucks and time. People sometimes comment to me that ‘you are expensive’, then I ask where they eat and what they spend and when I break it down for them on paper…its often only $10-$15 difference for 2 people between us and a say large seafood chain…see my answer below…unless the consumer cares or frankly can tell the difference we will all be fighting for the same core customer. — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston.

Ho! The independent restaurant will always be around. Passionate independent owners will prevail! —Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.

We will miss the hospitality the uniqueness and the comfort. Corporations will not be able to match the passion and love poured into independent operations. — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas.

Independents will always sprout, the spirit of creativity and enterprise won’t fade. That’s human nature. Only that the successful independents grow and become larger corporations — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.

A specific clientele will always exist to dine at independent restaurants, due to their affiliation with the local community and products. The power of corporations lies in their ability to brand, market and research the demand for more definitively specific types of cuisine and price points. Both types of places have value, but a locally owned business will always have more meaning. A new outfit from Nordstrom’s is a great present, but something that you made yourself is extraordinary. — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin.

Yes—trusting the chef and knowing that the owner is in the same dining room you are in and will be there to take care of any problem you might have.

—Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston.

Not as long as I am alive. What will we miss most when all the restaurants are operated by corporations? The personalities owner operated restaurants always produce such a wide variety of interesting folks, if it does become endangered then hopefully dinner clubs will come back into style. — Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston.

Read 16 for Jeff Blank’s Answer.

The independent restaurant is not endangered. We are on the brink of having an explosion of talented young food and beverage professionals who are looking to redefine he way Texans think about a quality dining experience. And that experience is going to take place in independent restaurants. — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston.

Sadly, I believe independents will continue to decline. Chains have tremendous buying power and political clout these days. Politically speaking, they have suggested requiring higher minimum wages and employee benefits for foodservice employees, which could effectively put most independents out of business. Though I don’t see this passing any time soon, there is little resistance by the independent crowd as we are all busy and poorly organized as a group. Even our political representatives like the TRA find much more advantages to supporting the needs of Outback Steakhouse over the mom and pop soda shop. There’s more money at stake. It wouldn’t surprise me to see independents squeezed down to less than 5% in the next 5-10 years. It will be a sad day when every menu in the country includes fried cheese, nachos, queso dip, wings, and potato skins, We’ll miss the unique nature of what independent chefs can create instead of what corporate chefs can bank on. — Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth.

Yes, endangered yet doing well in captivity.

We will miss soul. The feeling of knowing that your going to be taken care of from the second you walk in the door. True, honest and genuine service. — Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio

No they are not — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio

(First part of question): yes. (Second part): personality. — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas.

See above. No way, in fact, every small independent upscale restaurant plays an indispensable role in developing new cooking styles while protecting the traditional comforts found in the classics. — Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin.

As long as there are conscious people about how the world will work when we’re gone, independent restaurants will remain. But it won’t be as glamorous it will be a sacrifice of life for the love of food — David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin.

Unfortunately, yes. We will miss the ability to discover new things and fine, young talent. — John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.

This will never happen. — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas.

(First question): No.

(Second question): Firstly — real food. Made with quality products & integrity in cooking preparations. Mass produced food is void of quality & good energy & as a result — true flavor. Lost will be a true dining experience and a sense of eating for fulfillment and not just to fill a stomach. — Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin.

This is a very important issue. Independents are in danger of being swallowed up or losing their market share to chains and conglomerates. Many customers don’t know their neighborhood restaurant is not local at all but has a parent company out of Chicago or New York. Many chains are very adept at hiding their parentage. They have many different concepts and they appear to be unique. An independent has local roots, is a part of the community, understands it’s customer base in a way a chain cannot. An independent operator understands the local food trends and does not develop menu items for country wide appeal. They are only concerned with their own community. Finally, and most importantly, independent operators are following a dream, often on a shoestring, risking it all against everyone’s advice – for some unknown reason even to themselves. There is an authentic, regional feel to it that a chain cannot recreate, even with loads of money. In short, independents have heart. — Hugo Ortega: Hugo’s, Houston.

(First question): Yes.

(Second questions): This will never happen. But as there are fewer independents we will miss the entrepreneurial spirit, the “can do” attitude, and the creativity that comes from “having to make it work!” And of course GOOD FOOD. A dinning experience that has a personal touch that maintains the integrity of ownership. As a dear mentor restaurateur told me, “that if you like the owner you’ll most likely like the food and if you like the food you’ll most likely like the owner.” I started working in this business back in 1969 at the Steak N’ Ale on Anderson Lane when there were only five S&As in business. Steak & Ale was one of the first of the corporate food chains serving the family, when most eateries were independents….much has changed in these 38 years. — Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top.

Yes, they are in most cities, but Austinites support local and independent restaurants. We will miss creativity and freshness the most when all restaurants are owned by corporations. — Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.

No, I don’t think we are headed down that road. We will miss the maverick spirit of the independent chef/restaurateur — Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas.

Yes, see Aries — Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston.

No they are not nor will they ever be!!! We would miss food made with, passion, talent, and love for people. That is a formula for success. Make it about the guest, always the guest!!! I am willing independent restaurants to thrive!!!! — Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio.

Independently owned restaurants are definitely endangered. The independent chef / restaurant, producing everything in small numbers, insuring quality and integrity has a hard time competing with the larger corporate managed guys. The buying power of larger restaurant groups maintains a lower menu price for the cost conscious consumer. These consumers are the ones that really influence the overall dining community of most markets. Unfortunately, we live in a time that portion size, convenience and cheap are the major deciding factors for where we dine. We never see all independently owned restaurants disappear. Yet, if they were to fall to the corporate giants we would greatly miss the soul and love that the little guys put into every plate, the passion that waiters conduit from the chef to the diner, the understanding that food is more than sustenance or fuel for the body and the brotherhood that we chefs have for each other, the respect for the industry we have chosen. — Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.

I’m going to be optimistic here and say most chefs want to eventually have their own place. However it is very hard to be successful. That’s why a lot of the bigger named chefs eventually open other establishments. Of course once they do that, they too become a corporation. — Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston.

No, the dream of owning one’s restaurant is what drives production, dedication and creativity. What will we miss most when all restaurants are operated by corporations? Will never happen. — Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas.

Hopefully not, If so people will miss the sense of adventure in dining. We will all be eating crab cakes and filet of beef. I don’t want to live in a world like that — Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston.

No, independently owned restaurants are more able to respond to what the customer wants without doing a “ market survey”, chef driven restaurants will always be around because most chefs I know do not flourish in a corporate environment, there will always be that little place that you love because the chef …CARES ABOUT HIS FOOD! — Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls.

Yes independents are an endangered species. They for the most part will be able to compete with the chains for a variety of reasons all related to finance. (a) Labor dollars; (b) food dollars; (c) marketing dollars. — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin.

No, we believe that independents are not endangered. On the contrary, independents will continue to flourish because it is the last bastion for entrepreneurship. While WalMart can eliminate the small retailer, corporate restaurants try to bring the spirit that the small independents have. Anyone can sell bicycles but just because you buy rice it doesn’t mean you know how to cook it. Independents see it as an art while corporations turn it into a science.

Nothing will be missed because it is more like what will the corporates try to emulate from the independents. They need us! — Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio.

I don’t think independently owned restaurants are endangered. I know I would miss and I think most of my regular customers will miss the comfort of seeing the owner, their regular bartender, server or the same faces in the kitchen. Like the TV show “Cheers.” NORM!! — Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin.

(First question): Yes. (Second question): Chefs like me. — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.

No, I feel it is the reverse. The chains are their own worst enemy. The independents do not compete against each other because we are all so different. Again it all goes back to knowing what is being served and by who and independents have a face to go along with the name. —Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.

Personality, creativity and genuine food. But I hope that the more aware we become of our life stiles and the impact that mass produce has on the future, the independently owned and local restaurant will be once again the trend and not the exception. — Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.

Unfortunately independents are endangered, I speak from experience. It takes a lot of money, space and time to build a really successful independent. They will be missed but, by no means are they all going to disappear especially when done right. Corporate restaurants lack a lot of things like ambience, passion for food, romance and genuine happiness to see regulars when they walk in the door. Corporations are run but robots from the “Chef” all the way up, down and side to side. — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.

Seems to be more chef driven restaurants and then corporations galore, no in-between. — Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston.

Good independent operators will continue to survive and prosper. The down side to our current tight economy is that the new and upcoming operators will not have the luxury of trying out their concepts and learning from trail and error and being able to make mistakes. The financial risks have become too great for most “wanna be” restaurant/chef operators. We all loose because we don’t get to enjoy the new fresh talents food and concepts. — Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.

That’s not going to happen! Eating out is entertainment. People want to try what is trendy and they also like to show their individuality thru their choices. Restaurants that are approachable yet unique enough to satisfy the desire for something new and distinctive are going to thrive. People love the personal touch that is delivered by the local owner or chef. — Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market

The cost of doing business has hurt the Chef/Owner corner spot for sure. Texans are too independent and big hearted to not root for the underdog. We will mourn the loss America’s of Culinary soul. However, there will always be patrons of the arts and a customer willing to pay for the best, brightest, unique experience. Good Luck Brinker. — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas.

Independently owned restaurants may be a minority in a sea of corporate chains, but they have such impact and ability to start trends that it would be disastrous to contemplate a scenario without them. Can you say jalapeno poppers, cheese sticks and sysco ribblets? — Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.

Yes, I do believe that independently owned restaurants are an endangered species and I think that is primarily due to the fact that it is becoming harder and harder to do business in this country. Labor laws, staffing, the cost of food, fuel, etc., continues to rise and the cost of owning your own restaurant will soon be a dream for many chefs. What will we miss most…Creativity, personalized service and someone knowing your name when you walk through that door. — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.

No. There is always plenty of opportunity for creative independent operators who can tantalize and entertain the guest. — Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.

No way, there will always be a place in our communities and our hearts to relish on the entrepreneur spirit, the work ethic, dedication, love, and hospitality, be it of a new immigrant family, a local kid, or a second career. — Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.

Yes, they are. Personality will be the first casualty. True affection and the personal touch that only an on-site owner can give. — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.

In the fine dining area independent restaurants are not going away. — Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas.

Independently owned restaurants are not an endangered species; I think it’s to the contrary. In fact, I think that with chefs receiving more media coverage, we’ll start seeing a lot more attention being paid to independent restaurants where ingredients are sourced from small farmers or purveyors and chefs can get a little creative. — Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.

No answer. — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.

Yes. Flavor, fresh ingredients (natural-organic). — Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

No answer. — Robert Del Grande: Café Annie, Houston.

18. Will “eat locally” and “slow food” continue to become more mainstream, or are they just yuppie fads?

At a certain price point it will be…the economics don’t work for the majority of restaurants and ultimately the consumers because a few bucks here and there is a big deal. When you eat out 5 nights a week it can add up for the consumer. — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston.

I wish there were more co-op farmers and ranchers in the area. Dallas and Texas are far behind in the use of local ingredients. —Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.

I think they will continue to become more mainstream — I think people will continue to become more health conscious and also with the impact of oil pricing and transportation — it might become an indirect effect of the economy. — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas.

As consumers get more educated about food, both these will keep growing — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.

“Eat Locally” and “slow food” are only phrases used mostly by pretentious people who really have no idea what they even mean, and just jump on the bandwagon with everyone else to be safe. I’m willing to guess the majority of them don’t even cook themselves, and this will soon be dead fad. Convenience will always win in America. — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin.

More mainstream.

—Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston.

I think it is a natural progression, it was first. If these ideas and methods fade away we will lose a lot more than just things associated with the culinary world. — Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston.

“It will/must gain strength.” — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.

Eating locally and slow food are here to stay. — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston

I think they sound great and people love to say they support these movements, but they’ll still stop by Whataburger when it’s convenient. Green is the big buzzword right now, and people will probably try to eat green, shop green and live green in theory, but practically I doubt much really changes in day to day behavior. — Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth.

More mainstream. I truly believe we have not even started to climb this enormous mountain to sustainability industry wide. If the public gets it, all restaurants will follow suite, and once the price comes down, the bandwagon will get bigger. — Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio

the ideas will continue and blend into the mainstream — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio

This depends on the media — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas.

An 80 billion dollar industry just doesn’t go away, but it will shed its political self righteousness — Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin.

It’ll grow but just as a small percentage of the population growth or the growth of chains and fast foods. So it will grow but proportionally comparing to the growth of the bad it’s a small dent. — David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin.

Yes, they will continue to become more mainstream because they make sense. — John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.

Yes it is reality. — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas.

I really believe the change will continue to be to get back to nature=respect the land=sustainability=support locally=feed the body & soul with clean & positive food=no tolerance of feedlot meats & bio-engineered food=integrity & respect of food=sharing of food=real value of our food — Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin.

FADS. — Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top.

They will continue to grow. — Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.

They will become the expected practice. — Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas.

I believe that “yuppie fads” are one thing, eating locally, as goofy as it sounds, is another. We have by degrees, always eaten locally. — Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston.

No fad, just common sense approach to cooking and it tastes REALLY good. — Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio.

If we can make these more affordable for the average consumer they will become mainstream. The key is affordability. Nothing would make me happier. — Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.

I would like to believe that these are not just fads. While realizing that not all the public are engrossed in the culinary scene people are becoming much more conscience of what they’re eating, where the product comes from and how it’s raised. Gaining a lot more attention to the locally grown surportive and made from scratch Restaurants. — Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston.

Seasonal, organic “non-processed” and “locally produced” are time-honored traditions in other cultures but have only been hovering on the American (and Texan) culinary landscape for several decades. Eventually, sooner than later, these trends will become part of our fabric. — Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas.

I hope that chefs will understand what buying local does. It helps your economy, maybe not much but it does. We have to be willing to take the extra step to put the freshest and best ingredients out there, not just pick up the phone and place an order. When you know your farmers name and see the love and passion that he or she puts into their products, it make us better as chefs. You don’t waste anything. — Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston.

I hope they will become more and more mainstream, but it is up to the chefs and consumers who care to demand more and more of this from their suppliers. Most of the Farmers Markets you go to are more “arts & crafts” than small farmers. People have forgotten where their food comes from; parents will take their kids to a petting zoo, but are afraid to let them know that some of these animals provide food for us. It will never become more than a fad until people face up to the reality of “how that steak got on your plate”. When people finally make that connection, that’s when they quit being fads —Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls.

This unfortunately will always be fringe, simply because of economics! — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin.

We believe that this will remain as more people re becoming more conscientious about what they consume. — Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio.

I hope not. — Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin.

More mainstream. — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.

Yes, they will be more mainstream. customers want to see the money they spend stay in the community that they live. — Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.

Hopefully not, if it can be more widely accessible. Local, slow and well crafted food will set the frame for memorable moments that stay with all for a life time. — Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.

Slow food rocks but, not too slow. Eat locally is great if you have a whole bunch of good farmers. Yuppy fads Suck. you know who you are. — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.

Both will remain, guest enjoy local ingredients and organic green is on the rise. — Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston.

Eat locally and slow food is here to stay in one form or another because both concepts involve much more than just the presentation and taste of the food on a plate. Our consumers are becoming just as concerned with the environment and the nutritional and health benefits of the food that they eat. — Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.

These are not fads, but rather lifestyle adjustments that will continue to gain momentum. — Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market

They will continue. Maintaining a connection to a local, regional identity in the face of Globalization is a human reaction, not a fad. — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas.

Definitely not a fad. — Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.

I truly hope that farmers start growing more food in American and I want to start seeing more locally grown and locally produced products because in order for the world to become green, we need to start relying on ourselves and not on other countries to provide. Locally grown vegetables, fruits, spices, etc. will continue to be sought after and will eventually decrease our energy costs of shipping products from other areas. — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.

There will be a place in the market for these things so that they will be available as an option for consumers, but probably not large in scope. — Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.

YES! — Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.

Lets hope so. The chains do not like these concepts. — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.

Yes local, slow and natural will continue to be a mainstream topic. — Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas.

I think eating locally and slow foods should become more mainstream, but I don’t know if it will. That said, it will stick around, because I think that those two concepts, as well as eating organic, small-farm ingredients, is something that people do enjoy and appreciate when they experience it. — Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.

Yes. — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.

I hope they are not yuppie fads, or this country is in big trouble. — Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

No answer. — Robert Del Grande: Café Annie, Houston.

19. How will the state’s emerging Hispanic majority impact the culinary scene?

There wont be cheap labor much longer … and that’s a good thing! You will need to take care of your guys economically and emotionally or they will move to the next gig. — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston.

More Hispanic labor will benefit the industry. Most of the Hispanics are loyal, talented, and hard-working. —Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.

I think the expectation of true Regional Mexican food will be a must — Tex Mex will slowly fade away and the demand for true authentic cuisine with become more predominant. — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas.

No change, some come for shopping and buy homes in new suburbs, then go dine in restaurants where the others worked, as it has been for a while it will remain for a while — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.

Every restaurant in Texas employs Hispanic workers and cooks. They are the backbone of our industry, and without them many local establishments could not survive. Their influence on the culinary scene is vast due to the ever increasing popularity of Tex-Mex cuisine and new and innovative variations brought forth by American chef. — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin.

Hispanic people have more of an open mind to try different foods, like French, Spanish and Creole. Plus, dining at late hours and more work force, but less expensive.

—Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston.

Our culture is already threaded with this impact and has been all my life — Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston.

“More of the same for the next few years.” — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.

The impact will be more cultural diversity in the culinary lexicon. — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston.

I believe that the Hispanic population is the backbone of the Texas food scene today. Look behind the kitchen doors at your favorite chef hotspot. The finest kitchens are more likely staffed with Mexican immigrants than budding new chefs. They are an essential part of the Texas food scene because of their outstanding work ethic. — Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth.

As in any state, it will affect everything from the workforce to the diner’s preferences.. –Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio

Texas is so diverse that I don’t see that it will change the scene. — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio

Aren’t they already doing this? — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas.

Good question. Maybe the answer depends on how will their tastes change as they assimilate over time and move up the socio-economic ladder. Should we try to replicate mom’s tamales? I wouldn’t recommend it. As for fine dining, Southwestern cuisine has already come and gone, but its once new and exciting ingredients are now staples (see chipotle above). The adaptation to spicier food has already occurred on our end, the interesting part of this question will be how demands change as Hispanics growing affluence force them to move beyond a strictly regional approach to food. The real test will come when more Hispanic chefs begin to make their mark. Where will their cultural roots take their cooking, especially in the fine dining realm? — Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin.

Mexican food and Tex mex are the cuisines of Texas. The food should get better since a lot of hispanics bring the food culture into our land and a lot of them are good cooks because their parents cook not just go to fast food restaurants. — David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin.

It’s an opportunity to cater to an emerging demographic of fine-dining customers. –John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.

The Hispanic diversity will bring new trends and strength to the the workforce. — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas.

It would be nice to see an emergence in Hispanics opening higher end restaurants — reflecting more specific regional cuisines — Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin.

We will see food from other hispanic countries become more mainstream over the next 5 years. Peru, Chile and Ecuador come to mind in particular. — Hugo Ortega: Hugo’s, Houston.

I don’t see this as a Hispanic issue. We must “respect the dignity of others” as they walk through our front door, down the road as we drive, and into every aspect of our lives. We still have to provide a quality product, attentive service, and an experience that creates a great memory no matter who walks through the door! The food still turns to you crap in 24-hours but relationships last a lifetime. For one to truly succeed in this business one has to fully grasp that they are in the marketing/relationship business not the restaurant business. In doing so they set themselves apart from everyone serving food from the convince store to the fast food operator to the white table cloth setting to the prepared meals at the grocery. — Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top.

There will continue to be more Mexican flavors on the plate (e.g., chiles, salsas, etc.). — Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.

We in the industry will need to be catering their expectations. — Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas.

Hopefully with a vivre unprecedented. — Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston.

We will see this majority leadership in all aspects of foodservice owning and sharing the top positions and thriving. Continuing to push our industry forward welcoming diversity. Excellent future for all!!!!! — Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio.

I don’t think we could fit another Mexican restaurant in Texas, can we? — Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.

Food wise the impendent cultures of the different states are starting be more prevalent, so its no longer just Mexico, Bolivia or Chile. Its Oaxaca, Yucatan, Concepcion, Santa Cruz or Tarija. — Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston.

Immensely, as it already has. Super markets, fast food chains and expensive eateries will all be impacted. Virtually every one from all socio-economic backgrounds will be affected. — Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas.

No answer — Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston.

I’ve been in and out of restaurants in Texas since the late 70’s; they have already made a huge impact. (Ignacio, thanks for your abuelita’s tamale recipe) — Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls.

For years in the restaurant industry Hispanics have taken a lead role. Look at successful restaurants now and you will find people from South America, Mexico, Costa Rica, etc., and they have been running the kitchens for years. We have already experienced that impact. — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin.

As the Hispanics immigrate and mature in our region they bring with them culinary skills and blend them with our local resources to create new flavors. — Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio.

I hope we see more of their regional countries food, ingredients, culinary traditions, and family traditions (ex. Grandmother’s recipes) — Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin.

Already has. — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.

Hopefully it will enrich the scene with more food from Central America, and we will have more cultural diversity. — Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.

Personally, I will like to see more of the traditional food customs in our every day life, but the reality seems to me, almost complete assimilation in to the current massive marketing of the food industry. — Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.

The Hispanic community has always played a big part in the culinary scene (even in NYC). They are in every aspect of the restaurant industry from top to bottom just like everyone else. — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.

It’s already on the scene, always has been the back bone of our state. — Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston.

I feel it will continue to be a positive impact. I’m used to the culinary work force in Texas being predominately Hispanic. There is a growing trend of young talented Hispanics seeing the restaurant business as a profession rather than just an hourly job. So, they are taking leadership rolls as chefs and managers and bringing much needed energy and fresh approaches to the food and service. — Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.

The cuisines of Central and South America developed as a wonderful mix of indigenous foods with European and Middle Eastern influences. A Hispanic majority in our area is only going to accelerate the showcasing of these authentic old world cuisines. The CIA’s Center for Foods of the Americas in San Antonio signals the beginning of this movement. — Charles Butt, H-E-B, and John Campbell, Central Market

Note to self “Must learn Spanish.” — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas.

They will inject more and more of their cuisine and techniques into the main stream as well as play a crucial roll in operating and running restaurants. — Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.

As the Hispanic population continue to increase, I believe that menus will gradually migrate to being more conducive of the Hispanic culture and we will see more food and flavors from south of the border. However, I think this question poses another question…what is our government going to do with the immigration situation that we are currently in because if illegal immigrants cannot work here and are being deported, labor issues will arise and negatively impact every aspect of the food industry. — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.

There will be a lot more Hispanic entrepreneurs and Hispanic-owned businesses, creating more Hispanic leaders — owners and chefs — in the culinary field. — Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.

They will continue to be the major force in our dinning scene both as the major labor but more and more as talent contributors as we continue to introduce the richness of the latin culture and cuisine. It is a great time to be Latin in America! — Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.

There will be a new wave of fast food restaurants coming soon that are geared toward the Hispanic culture. — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.

It already has the Hispanic influence is wide spread and we will see more fine dining type of Hispanic restaurants where the people are focusing on the traditional foods of there countries presented and serve in a modern way. — Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas.

I think it’s great for our state’s culinary scene. There are such great food traditions in Hispanic cultures, whether it’s the use of chiles, fresh fruits and vegetables, seafood, spices, corn or anything else. I know that my restaurants and my palate is richer thanks to the Hispanic influence. — Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.

No answer. — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.

It already has. — Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

No answer — Robert Del Grande: Café Annie, Houston.

20. What is the most important thing a young chef needs to learn in order to succeed in tomorrow’s kitchens?

Forget about recipes…understand the culture. Forget about illusions of grandeur…do everyone a favor and learn to cook first. You don’t know anything…work 10 years and realize you still don’t know anything. Oh…and know that it has all been done!!! — Lance Fegen: Glass Wall, Houston.

Young chefs need to learn the classic basics, then they can expand from the basics and create their own dishes. —Chris Ward, Mercury Grill, Dallas.

1. A young chef needs to understand that it takes TIME, this is not a trade that is learned from a book or school or even a great mentor. This is a trade that constantly evolves — you have to allow it to become a part of you.

2. Learn how to lead!. Cooking is the easy part — every great chef you see today is not there just because they can cook. They are successful because of their ability to lead others and inspire. Success in cooking is no different than success in any other profession — if your not a great manager no one will care how great your food is. — David Bull: Bolla, Stoneleigh Hotel & Spa, Dallas.

That it is like going to L.A. to be a movie star, [i.e., you] struggle for years before you make it (if) and that “if” is sizable, haven’t checked the statistics between the two but I will bet they are pretty close. Integrity and character come even before talent… — Damien Watel: Bistro Vatel, San Antonio.

Young cooks need patience most importantly. It takes a lifetime to become a chef, and a good one never stops listening and learning. They need to have a superior attention to detail, and constantly strive to teach, top-grade, and implement systems to control and evolve their food into the vision they have for what it will be. Have a clear idea of what exactly you are trying to accomplish and what you can do to separate yourself from everyone else. Talented cooks make food well, but a chef’s food is great consistently. Every day counts, and you are only as good as your last plate. — Tyson Cole: Uchi, Austin.

Stay in your kitchen and stay focused and kiss your customers’ ass.

—Charles Clark: Ibiza & Catalan Food & Wine, Houston.

The most important thing I have ever learned is I really don’t know anything. The amount of information, style, culture, technique, product and innovations in the culinary world is immense. Not to mention, architecture, art, style, music, history, psychology, sociology, plumbing, refrigeration, all of these things and more can be just as important as knowing how to boil an egg. — Bryan Caswell: Reef, Houston.

“Learn how to market yourselves. Move from quality restaurant chef to restaurant chef (learning as much as possible) without looking like a vagrant.” — Jeff Blank: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.

Animal husbandry and agriculture. — Jeb Stuart: Shade, Houston

Students or young chefs today need to spend less time on the latest trends and The Food Network, and begin with basic skills. What good is learning Sous Vide if you cannot sauté or finely dice and onion? Learning the basic skills and techniques is essential to success in the kitchen, especially for those hoping to open their own restaurant. After that, the world can be your oyster. A good skill set with a creative mind and sharp palate can achieve anything. Without the basic skills, you will be out of business before you even open the doors. It’s a matter of learning to crawl before learning to walk. The celebrity aspect of being a chef often gets in the way of the hard work it takes to get there. No chef ever just starts out, gets their own show and goes on a book tour in their first year. Learn, practice, work hard, stick to your strengths, find your niche and the rewards will some day follow. — Jon Bonnell: Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine, Fort Worth.

Self discipline. This is not an industry that gives anything to you. You learn it, you earn it or you get thrown to the dogs. Have the respect to read on your own time, to experiment on your own time. When you come in looking for a 40 hour work week paycheck and think your gonna be a sous chef in 6 months, your in the wrong business. There are 500% more cooks today then there were 5 years ago, hell even 2 years ago and as the market becomes saturated the competition will become more fierce. So get to work early, work for free and drop that undeserved ego and do it exactly as you were shown by your chef, not your professor that you paid $50,000 to teach you how to make hollandaise! — Jason Dady: The Lodge, San Antonio

to travel and see the world of foods outside of their environment — Bruce Auden: Biga on the Banks, San Antonio

Work ethic. This depends, of course, on how success is measured. — Anthony Bombaci: Nana, Hilton Anatole hotel, Dallas.

Patience. Patience in their cooking and patience in their careers. Cooking schools have forgotten to teach patience as they hurry kids through, collecting ever higher tuitions sold as tickets to instant promotion and fame. It’s a damn shame. — Stewart Scruggs: Wink, Austin.

business and management. — David Garrido: formerly of Jeffrey’s, now developing Garrido’s, Austin.

Work ethic, the ability to learn and take constructive criticism. Listen to your clientele, ignore the competition and focus on your own thoughts and creativity. Lead by example, and never stop cooking (especially in your own kitchen). — John Tesar: Mansion Restaurant, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek hotel, Dallas.

Longevity and how to make a sauce! — Dean Fearing: Fearing’s, Ritz-Carlton hotel, Dallas.

Leave your ego at the door. Learn to cook for your audience — whoever that is — and not yourself.

Know that being a chef is half cooking talent and half management of your staff & working within food & labor budgets. You may be able to cook — but will never be successful without management & cost controls in your kitchen.

It’s not all glamour! It’s not all fun! — Lisa and Emmett Fox: Fino, Austin.

Always follow your heart – do not waver to follow trends that divert your focus. Learn to control costs, both labor and food. Build a team that includes front and back of the house. Allow yourself to learn from people that have experience. Keep your ego in check – be humble. Get to know your customers. — Hugo Ortega: Hugo’s, Houston.

Go find someone to work for that will teach you how to cook and give you hands on training in the back of the house. Forget all the “local” culinary schools which are rip offs and spit out folks who are line cooks with a set of knives and lots of debt! As a matter of fact, these schools hurt the industry cause folks are coming out of them with so much debt that they can’t afford to work in a kitchen. If you are dead set on going to culinary school then go deeper into debt and go to the CIA or Johnson & Wales where you then can walk out better qualified to step into the business with an education that is much more valuable than which you would get at the “local” culinary mill. — Bud Royer: Royers Round Top Café, Round Top.

Professionalism — Robert Rhoades: Hudson’s on the Bend, Austin.

They have to be less impatient about the rate at which they can advance in this profession. — Tom Fleming: Central 214, Dallas.

How to study! How to listen, et al!! — Scott Tycer: Gravitas, Houston.

One word, PERSEVERANCE!!!!!!! — Scott Cohen: Watermark Hotel Company, San Antonio.

Humility. — Will Packwood: Cibo, Austin.

Dedication. It’s not all about the money.

This is a career not just a job. And it’s a long hard road, but well worth the trip !! — Jason Gould: Gravitas, Houston.

Business skills (controlling food and labor costs) and understanding the balance of creative recipes and giving the public it wants. — Stephan Pyles: Stephan Pyles, Dallas.

Passion and drive. Don’t be lazy. Stay focused on what you do and stay true that. — Chris Shepherd: Catalan Food and Wine, Houston.

The Food Network will never call you, if that is what you want, change jobs. Learn your craft, you are not an artist, your craft can be artistic but you are a craftsman and should be proud of that. Also, spend what little money you will have on good knives and eating at the best restaurants in town. — Mark Schmidt: Café 909, Marble Falls.

A young chef must understand and embrace the impending shortage of skilled and unskilled labor (baby boomers and immigration reform). They must develop employees — make them more productive — compensate the better and finally retain them. — William McKenna: Texas Culinary Academy, Austin.

They must learn leadership skills so that they can direct their team in order to get them where they want to go. i.e. higher earning potential, status, Food Network, multi-unit, fine-dining. — Diana Barrios Treviño: Los Barrios, San Antonio.

Long hours. I think a lot of young people that call me about going to culinary school need to work in a kitchen for a couple of years before dropping all that money. It’s not as glamorous as it appears. — Marion Gillcrist: La Traviata, Austin.

Commitment, passion, dedication. — Avner Samuel: Aurora, Dallas.

Know your customers, there is more to becoming a chef than being a great cook, you need to possess people skills and business skills as well. — Randy Evans: Brennan’s of Houston, Houston.

It’s all about the costumer! And what you can contribute to there experience. It takes work, do it well, and do it once. — Alma Alcocer-Thomas: Jeffrey’s, Austin.

The most important thing a young chef needs to know is the basics with speed, precision and proper seasoning. But at the rate we are going with corporate America maybe some knowledge on opening boil in bag’s is much needed. Oh yeah and everybody that goes to culinary school isn’t going to make it to food network, it’s a tough life and job so you have to love doing it. I do I’m a lifer. — Paul Petersen: Café Cenizo, Gage Hotel, Marathon.

Good listening skills, team work, dedication, ability to keep striving for more knowledge—and to stay focused. — Mark Cox: Mark’s American Cuisine, Houston.

Forget about all of the TV and cooking school hype… this is a hard profession that takes years of you paying your dues and learning the basics from cooking under seasoned chefs and kitchen crews. It is harder to roast the perfect chicken than to create a dish with 5 sauces that is stacked 5 inches tall. — Lou Lambert: Lamberts Downtown Barbecue, Austin.

It’s all about passion. Stay true to authentic ingredients, master the culinary basics, find your own direction, and relentlessly pursue your goals. Above all, stay humble and develop a palate! — John Campbell, Central Market

See #19.

Nothing is ever as it seems, only as the customer sees it. Think like the Guest, not like a Chef, once in awhile. — Nick Badovinus: formerly of Hibiscus, now developing F\NB, Dallas.

Cook with your heart and a sense of place and season and most importantly learn how to season properly. — Andrew Weissman: Le Rêve, San Antonio.

It takes a lot of hard work to become an old chef and every chef of tomorrow has to be an entertainer…they need to engage their customers and look at their job not only as creating an unforgettable meal but creating an unforgettable experience. Entertaining people is what the restaurant business is all about. — Kent Rathbun: Abacus, Dallas.

They need to get an American Express card and travel to some major American cities, like San Francisco, New York, Chicago and eat in the great restaurants in those markets. They should bring back those experiences and some of the wonderful ideas out there and augment them with their own ideas and creativity. Just as important, though, is that they never let their curiosity of culinary creativity become stale.

They must take advantage and fully utilize the resources available today through the internet, and food channels and magazines. They should eat out often and develop a keen sense of what guests want today — and develop a vision for what they don’t know they will crave tomorrow. Chris Pappas: Pappas Restaurants, Houston.

Espanol por favor! — Michael J. Cordúa: Americas, Houston.

Humility and how to take constructive criticism. — Bruce McMillian: Tony’s, Houston.

You will need to learn how to work hard, long hours and if you are smart you will pay attention to what your guests want and enjoy… the guest is why we are here. — Jason Weaver: French Room, Adolphus Hotel, Dallas.

I think the first thing a young chef needs to learn is the same lesson every young chef at every restaurant has ever learned — check your ego at the door. Being a chef isn’t easy, and you’re not going to be handed a TV show just because you make a mean risotto. Work hard, prove yourself and let your food speak for itself. — Tim Love: Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, Fort Worth.

Listen and practice. — John Sheely: Mockingbird Bistro, Houston.

The business end of the restaurant. — Rebecca Rather: Rebecca’s Table, Fredericksburg.

An important thing for young chefs to know is not to expect to be worshipped by the tomorrow’s diners (and, oh, how I miss those days); diners will increasingly see restaurant menus (that heart-felt-fingers-worked-to-the-bone-creative-menu) as only a suggestion. Food will still be creative, but if the diner is in the mood for an omelet, expect to break some eggs. — Robert Del Grande: Café Annie, Houston.

21. Other thoughts.

The cell phone is changing how we eat & cook:
Cell phones have changed how we communicate
& how we communicate changes how we socialize
& how we socialize changes how we eat
& how we eat changes how restaurants cook
(Note: restaurants simply mirror the times)
& the times have shifted toward the impromptu
& the impromptu has created a come-as-you-are crowd
& the come-as-you-are crowd is generating new niches
So the future of food will be heavily determined by the cell phone.
In fact, it’s already happening. “Let’s grab something to eat —
We’ll call a restaurant on the way” — Robert Del Grande: Café Annie, Houston.

I still believe that cell phones have had and will continue to have a substantial impact of restaurants. We are now in immediate reach of each other and it’s changing how we behave and socialize. I was at a reception this week and a woman came up to me to show me the screen on her cell phone. It had a text message from her husband. It said: “Honey — how about a bit to eat? I have a table at Café Annie. See you in 20 minutes.” That’s the sign of the times. — Robert Del Grande: Café Annie, Houston.

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