Taco Cabana is replacing six of its flavored margaritas, Dr Pepper and prickly pear among them. The San Antonio–based chain has subbed in sangria, green apple, strawberry-mango, pineapple chamoy, spicy guava, and tamarindo.

In other T.C. news, the company rolled out its QuesoMania promotion on Wednesday. The limited-time special offers three loaded chile con queso options: queso with corn, cotija cheese, and hot sauce; queso with chorizo, beans, and jalapeños; and queso with ground beef and pico de gallo.

The Kyle City Council scrapped plans to name a road Fajita Drive. The name was intended to honor local taquero and “Fajita King” Juan Antonio “Sonny” Falcón, but it sparked a petition asking the city to reconsider. Previously, the road was called Rebel Drive. For now, it will be simply be called West Ranch to Market Road 150, which seems like a fine name to us.

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La Laguna Mariscos & Sushi, a small seafood chain with locations across South Texas, has opened an outpost in San Antonio. The restaurant specializes in micheladas and Mexican sushi.

Adapting for the pandemic era, La Panadería’s original Broadway Street location in San Antonio has expanded its patio space for outdoor dining and is now offering contactless ordering via QR codes. The owners made the announcement via the Mexico City–style bakery’s Instagram account.

A moment of silence for the tacos that could have been, if not for the big rig that spilled “beef parts” across eastbound lanes of I-30 in Dallas on Monday.

Revolver Taco Lounge’s reservation-only, socially distanced dining space, La Resistencia, is now offering Sunday seafood brunch seatings for up to eight customers at a time.

Whataburger is offering a buy-one-get-one-free special for its pico de gallo burger via online ordering. The deal is valid through August 30.

Writers at Texas Tech University newspaper the Daily Toreador ate at every taco joint selling breakfast tacos within five miles of the Lubbock’s school campus. They ranked the top fifteen online. Number one gets a score of 9.3 out of 10 and is simultaneously surprising and not surprising.

On the subject of Buddy Holly’s hometown, Dallas-based chain Velvet Taco is planning a Lubbock location.

McAllen-based Neighborhood Molino & Tortilleria RGV has instituted a pay-what-you-can system. In doing so, the month-old business hopes to bring awareness to income inequality and food deserts in the Valley.

The owners of Houston’s Burger Joint are opening a taqueria in the city’s Heights neighborhood. It will be called the Taco Stand.

Also in Houston, Original Ninfa’s Uptown employees were surprised to learn that they were locked out by the building’s landlord. The owner of Ninfa’s parent company, Legacy Restaurants, claimed to be shocked, as the lockout occurred during lease negotiations that involved rent relief, though not forgiveness. The Original Ninfa’s on Navigation is still open.

Michael Wyont of Flores Tortillas was a guest on the YouTube series and podcast Kevin’s BBQ JointsWyont talked about his unlikely pivot from barbecue to tortillas.

Texas Rangers fans can get their favorite ballpark snacks delivered to their doors via the Hungry delivery service. The Rangers Fiesta package includes burritos, tacos, nachos, and, of course, peanuts and Cracker Jacks.

Dead End Food Shack has opened in Midland, serving up carne asada fries, tacos, Hatch chile burgers, and mounds of elevated bar food to complement its sister business, Detour Bar.

In Austin, El Alma owner and Mexico City native Alma Alcocer launched the multitiered, members-only El Alma at Home program, which includes recipes, meal kits, and cocktails. The cheapest membership level is $5 a month. That gets you a newsletter with a recipe and cooking tips. The $75 VIP subscription includes virtual cooking classes, a meal kit, a cocktail kit, and an instructional video. All tiers include free queso when dining in at the restaurant.

An Austin Redditor posted an image of a sign that reads, “I feel that tacos are more important than pumpkin spice. There, I said it. Fight me.” To its creator we say, “Gosh, y’all. We’re on your side. But as veterans of previous taco wars, we can assure you there is enough conflict in the world right now. Maybe ease up on the coffee.”

Torchy’s Tacos is rethinking its expansion plans. According to the Austin Business Journal, CEO G.J. Hart was planning to open twenty new locations this year. Then the pandemic hit, and sales dropped by half. The brand is considering ghost kitchens, where delivery-only meals are prepared.

Kansas City–based podcast Taco the Town visited its local Torchy’s for a socially distanced episode. It kicks off with host W. David Keith incorrectly claiming that Austin is the birthplace of the breakfast taco.

By the way, this week is Kansas City Taco Week. Why don’t Texas cities have a taco week? Even Cleveland, Ohio, now has one.

The upcoming season of Netflix’s Chef’s Table tackles barbecue and features an episode on Mexico’s version of the cooking process. In the first trailer for the series, a voice can be heard saying, “This is where barbecue started.” That’s not wrong. The series premieres on September 2.

Also on Netflix, the second season of Taco Chronicles will be released September 15. This time around, episode locations include Austin. Watch the trailer below.

Yours truly was interviewed by Maria Hinojosa on the Latino USA podcast and was a panelist on the “Tacos, Texas and Tradition” session of the UTSA’s Food for Thought online discussion series.

You no longer have a reason to say there is no good Mexican food in New York City. A group from Stony Brook University did the hard work for you and put everything into historical context. “The Mexican Restaurants of New York City: A Visual History of Mexican People & Their Cuisine” is a well-researched, thoughtful, and thorough report on the history of Mexican food and the people behind the cuisine in the Big Apple. One of the newest developments in New York Mexican restaurant options is, of course, birria.

The birria taco craze is taking off in New Mexico, according to an article posted on KRQE’s website. Angelo Orona, administrator of the Tacos of New Mexico Facebook group, calls the tacos “very photogenic.”

In the season-two premiere of First We Feast’s Tacos Con Todo, host Jesus Trejo munches on tacos from L.A.-based Evil Cooks’ pop-up (which made a Dallas appearance last year), and guest Bert Kreischer chows down on Texas breakfast tacos from Home State.

A familiar restaurant business story: Tacos Sinaloa in Berkeley is struggling to remain open amid the coronavirus pandemic. Owner Marlem Bueno says revenue is down by 80 percent.

What do the owners of a Bay Area taco truck do after giving away food despite struggling financially amid the pandemic? If that mobile food operation is La Santa Torta, they drive to wildfire-ravaged areas of California to feed undocumented farmworkers.

Farther afield: Glasgow, Scotland, is getting a new Mexican food joint. It’s called the Luchador. Nicknamed “The Luchy,” the restaurant, which is due to open soon, is going all-in on the theme of Mexican wrestling. Tacos are on the menu, of course, as are cocktails and craft beer.

Taco Bell opened its first location in Beijing, featuring rice bowls and other culturally specific menu options.

And Domino’s has hopped on the taco pizza bandwagon with its chicken taco pizza.