Dallas

Music |
April 30, 1996

Riffs on Roy

Oak Cliff native Roy Hargrove may not have the depth and seasoning of Wynton Marsalis, but the 26-year-old prodigy could still be one of the great jazz trumpeters of our day.

Art |
April 30, 1996

Her Three Sons

For the Wilsons of Dallas, taking pictures was a family affair. Today the mother is a successful photographer and her boys are hot Hollywood commodities. Here’s a look at Laura Wilson’s personal album.

Sports |
April 30, 1996

Arlo Eisenberg

When he left the University of Texas at Austin in 1993 with a broken ankle, a backpack, and a one-way ticket to Los Angeles, Arlo Eisenberg had no intention of becoming a big wheel—he just wanted to skate. Yet within three months, the Dallas native was performing with Team Rollerblade,

Health |
March 1, 1996

Pale by Comparison

“Michael Jackson’s disease” sounds like a punch line, but the pigment-robbing skin disorder is no joke. Just ask Dallas County commissioner John Wiley Price.

Sports |
March 1, 1996

The Jones Gang

You know the real reason Texas Stadium has no roof? So Jerry Jones can get his head inside. (Or, how the Cowboys owner’s ego makes it hard to root for America’s Team.)

News & Politics |
January 1, 1996

Rush to Justice

Kim Wozencraft meant to spend her life putting drug pushers behind bars—until she became an addict. Now, more than a decade later, she’s fighting against the justice system she once embraced.

Health |
January 1, 1996

Smooth Operator

You might say Tarek Souryal is the most important Dallas Maverick: He doesn’t score or rebound, but he reconstructs million-dollar ankles and knees, and that makes him a real team player.

Energy |
November 1, 1995

Crude Awakening

There’s black gold in the South American rain forest—lots of it. Can the oil companies get it out without ruining the jungle and the way of life of the Indians who live there? The perils of drilling in the heart of darkness.

Business |
November 1, 1995

Hostile Makeover

Mary Kay Ash and Jinger Heath have made fortunes getting women to buy and sell their beauty products. But no lipstick or powder can conceal the ugliness between these Dallas cosmetics queens.

Art |
July 31, 1995

The Texas Kid, 1988

The late folk artist Willard Watson was a funky fixture of Dallas’ art scene. Better known as the Texas Kid, he was famous or his courly manners, cockammy yard art in his Love Field-area home, and eye-popping, Longhourn-crowned luxury cars. Watson often collaborated with other artists; in 1976, for example,

Business |
April 30, 1995

Are Texans Gun Crazy?

During the first week of April, as the Legislature considered the case for concealed weapons, Texas mourned the consequences of two gun-related tragedies in Corpus Christi: the murder of Tejano superstar Selena Quintanilla Perez and the shooting of five workers at a refinery inspection company by a disgruntled

Art |
January 1, 1995

Brush With Fame

As a curator and in his own work as a painter, Jerry Bywaters left a lasting legacy of Texas art.

Food & Drink |
June 30, 1994

State Fare

This creation mixes and matches ingredients from the countries of the Mediterranean: grilled portobello mushrooms from Italy, olive oil from France or Spain, hummus-tahini spread from the Middle East.“This sandwich was my wife’s idea,” says David Holben, the executive chef at Dallas’ Mediterraneo. “She’s a vegetarian and she asked me

Sports |
May 31, 1994

Vain Glory

Jerry Jones may have the biggest ego in football, but don’t bet against him. Even without Jimmy Johnson, he still has the best team.

True Crime |
April 30, 1993

See No Evil

Dallas police say Charles Albright is the coldest, most depraved killer of women in the city’s history. To me, he seems like a perfect gentleman. Maybe too perfect.

Sports |
August 31, 1992

The Hungriest Coach

Three years after he replaced Tom Landry, Jimmy Johnson is giving Dallas Cowboys fans something to cheer about—and his critics are eating their words.

Art |
June 30, 1992

Hot Shot

Haven’t heard of Geof Kern, Texas’ most famous photographer? You must live here.

True Crime |
April 1, 1992

The Killer Next Door

For six years, my landlord and his wife were the perfect neighbors. Then he was accused of murdering her—and suddenly I didn’t know what to believe.

Art |
September 30, 1991

Buried Treasures

Sifting through stored collections, the Dallas Museum of Art discovers a tradition of spiritual subtlety among Texas artists.