Features

The Legend of John Holmes Jenkins

Feb 19, 2020 By Chris O'Connell

He was a notorious deal maker known for bringing priceless pieces of Texas history back to the state. He was also a suspected forger and arsonist. Thirty years ago, he was found dead in the Colorado River near Austin, and to this day a question remains: Could John Holmes Jenkins have masterminded his own death?

Fredericksburg Is the New Aspen

Jan 22, 2020 By John Davidson

The jewel of the Hill Country, my hometown, is lovelier than ever. I just wish more of the natives could afford to stick around and enjoy it. Scenes from a town transformed.

Bum Steers
The 2020 Bum Steer Awards

Dec 18, 2019 By Texas Monthly

Beto O'Rourke, Dennis Bonnen, and the Houston Astros make our annual dishonor roll, along with assorted lesser-known idiots and evildoers.

The Doctor, the Dentist, and the Killer

Dec 18, 2019 By Skip Hollandsworth

Brenda thought she and Ricky would be together forever, until he left her. Kendra thought she and Ricky would be together forever. Then Brenda took matters into her own hands. Inside the case of jealousy, spying, and murder that shook Uptown Dallas.

The Power of Boots

Nov 20, 2019 By Texas Monthly

The cowboy boot is more than a sturdy piece of workwear. It’s more than a fashion statement, too. It’s a vital piece of Texas culture, as complicated, diverse, and ever-evolving as the makeup of our state.

whiskey barrels
The Great Texas Whiskey Boom

Oct 16, 2019 By Eric Benson

A decade ago, there was no Texas whiskey. Today, the state’s craft distillers are making world-class bourbons and single malts—and slick imitators are trying to stake a claim.

Eastwood player encourages his teammates.
More Than a Game

Oct 8, 2019 By Michael J. Mooney

One month after a man from Plano drove to El Paso and murdered 22 people, a high school football game between the two communities became a chance to heal.

Saving Lives in Tomorrow’s War, Today

Oct 2, 2019 By David Wood

In the next big military conflict, experts expect heavy casualties on battlefields from which quick medical evacuation may be impossible. Whether wounded Americans live or die will depend on work happening now in Texas.

TEXAS HISTORY - Paredes and Dobie Illustration
Américo Paredes vs. J. Frank Dobie

Sep 18, 2019 By John Phillip Santos

For years, the great folklorist convinced many scholars and activists that the vaunted “Texas Man of Letters” was an anti-Mexican racist. Maybe it’s time to reconsider that judgment—as Paredes himself eventually did.

Ed Ates at his Cedar Hill home on June 1, 2019.
Crowdsourcing Justice

Jul 23, 2019 By Michael Hall

How does a man wrongly convicted of murder get released twenty years later? It helps to have a wife who loves you, a podcaster who believes in you, and an army of amateur sleuths who won’t stop digging for the truth.

Robert Jeffress
Trump’s Apostle

Jul 23, 2019 By Michael J. Mooney

No matter how incendiary his latest tweet or policy might seem, Donald Trump can count on evangelical preacher and Fox News fixture Robert Jeffress to defend him. What’s behind the Dallas pastor’s unconditional embrace?

rio grande
The Other Side of the Border

Jul 23, 2019 By Oscar Casares

Frustrated by the perception of the border as a lawless land, two native sons embarked on a 1,200-mile journey to capture, through a series of images and letters, the region’s untold stories.

Where to Stay Next: Five Upcoming Hotels

May 22, 2019 By Texas Monthly

In our June cover story, we look at the best new and renovated hotels that have opened since our last Where to Stay Now published in 2016. Many hotels are scheduled to open across the state over the next year. Here are five that we’re excited to visit in…