Congress

Larry McGuire’s Empire Grows

Apr 16, 2013 By Layne Lynch

The restauranteur nabbed chef Rebecca Meeker--formerly the chef de Cuisine at David Bull's Congress--to be a chef and project manager at the Austin landmark Jeffrey's. 

Did Andy Pettitte Change His Story?

Jan 21, 2013 By Jason Cohen

The former Astros pitcher's testimony in the federal perjury trial of Roger Clemens didn't help the prosecution, but was it different from what Pettitte said to Congress in 2008?

Where to Eat Now 2012

Jan 21, 2013 By Patricia Sharpe

White tablecloths. Street food. Small portions. Lots and lots of innards. The only thing the ten best new Texas restaurants have in common is a willingness to prove that there is no such thing as a “Texas restaurant.” But when the escargots with fennel purée are this good, who cares?

The Rehabilitation of Charlie Wilson

Jan 20, 2013 By John Spong

It happened in twelve steps, which is not surprising, given the legendary Lufkin lawmaker’s history with booze, broads, and bad behavior. For now, at least, it's taking.

Pay It Forward Tonight with Daniel Curtis and Austin Chefs

Aug 21, 2012 By Layne Lynch

Despite our most valiant efforts, we cannot predict the life events that await us around the corner. Before May of last year, Daniel Curtis – former food and beverage director of The Carillon – had every intention of continuing his work in the evolving Austin culinary scene. But when a diving accident on…

The Ten Best New Restaurants in Texas!!!

Feb 15, 2012 By Patricia Sharpe

Starting in 2002, I have eaten my weight in lamb chops, roasted beets, pork belly, and micro-cilantro every year to come up with Texas Monthly’s annual list of the most innovative, exciting, and delicious new Texas restaurants. For 2012, our feature “Where to Eat Now” runs the gamut from a…

More Proof That Austin Is Smoking Hot!

Jan 27, 2012 By Patricia Sharpe

There’s nothing like a bandwagon. No sooner did Food & Wine and Bon Appétit fall all over themselves to give Austin a whole lotta love than StarChefs.com (an online magazine for chefs and culinary insiders) decided to hold one of its four national awards ceremonies in…

Meet Ron Paul!

Nov 16, 2011 By Jason Cohen

Buoyed by a strong showing in two polls, the "other" Texas presidential candidate finally catches the eye of the Perry-fatigued media.

Ten Years After: Tom Perini’s 9/11 at the White House

Sep 9, 2011 By Jason Cohen

(The famous Perini Ranch mesquite-smoked peppered beef tenderloin. Photo by Pat Sharpe) Editor's Note: This guest post is by longtime Texan Jim Shahin, now a resident of Washington, D.C.... and "craving Central Texas barbecue almost every minute of every day," he says. The "Smoke Signals" columnist for the Washingon Post, Shahin was also a contributor to our 1997 barbecue Top 50. Ten years ago this month, Tom Perini arrived in Washington D.C., from his ranch in Buffalo Gap, Texas, proud to be catering the annual Congressional Picnic at the White House. The event was a huge deal for the Texas cowboy who started his career in 1973 as a chuck wagon cook for hungry ranch hands. In 1983, he had opened Perini Ranch Steakhouse, which developed a reputation for excellence far beyond Buffalo Gap, a town of about 400 outside Abilene. Academy Award-winner Robert Duvall had found his way to the remote restaurant, as had Billy Bob Thornton, who told Men’s Journal that Perini’s smoked brisket was the best he ever ate. Perini’s culinary fame eventually reached the Texas governor’s mansion, where he regularly catered barbecues for George W. Bush. “When he ran for president, I remember fantasizing about cooking at the White House,” recalls Perini. In May 2001, he got his chance when President Bush asked Perini to cater the 2001 Congressional Picnic in the fall. The gala would be a Texas-themed, and Texas-sized, party that would feature country music’s Ray Benson and Asleep at the Wheel. In June, Perini arrived in Washington to work out details with White House chefs. “I told them we were going to have bread pudding, green chile hominy, Southern green beans and beef tenderloin,” Perini, 68, recalls. “And the chef from the White House said, ‘You’re in Washington, and you have to cook chicken.’ I said, ‘I’m sorry, but I’m not serving chicken.’ “The room got real quiet. ‘When you are serving a Texas chuck wagon meal, you serve beef.’ I said, ‘If you want another meat, I’ll do catfish.’” After some discussion, and a later conversation with the president himself, the entrees were set: mesquite-smoked peppered tenderloin and fried catfish.

Little Big Man

Jan 1, 1977 By Griffin Smith Jr.

Is it worth being a United States senator when you’­re on the losing side all the time? Ask John Tower.