Law

Sports |
January 21, 2013

Lance Can’t Beat Sam Sparks

Austin's always colorful district judge smacks down a request by Lance Armstrong's lawyers for a temporary restraining order against the United States Anti-Doping Agency. It was refiled on Tuesday. 

Criminal Justice |
January 21, 2013

The Innocent Man, Part One

The National Magazine Award–winning story about Michael Morton, a man who came home from work one day in 1986 to find that his wife had been brutally murdered. What happened next was one of the most profound miscarriages of justice in Texas history.

Behind the Lines |
January 21, 2013

Fed Up!

Sure, Texas’s criminal justice system is tough. But as Fort Worth inmate Richard LaFuente could tell you, the federal criminal system is even tougher.

Texas History |
January 21, 2013

The Paper Chase

Houston attorney Bill Kroger and state Supreme Court chief justice Wallace Jefferson are on a mission to rescue thousands of crumbling, fading, and fascinating legal documents from district and county clerks’ offices all over the state. Can they save Texas history before it’s too late?

Feature |
May 31, 2011

Mind Games

Baylor College of Medicine neuroscientist David Eagleman is out to change the way we think about guilt and innocence (and time and novels and, well, neuroscientists). Can he pull it off?

Criminal Justice |
June 30, 2004

Greg Ott, Free

Greg Ott, the philosophy graduate student who was convicted of killing a Texas Ranger in 1978, has finally been released and is getting on with his life.

Politics & Policy |
December 1, 2002

The Secret History

Did Richard King cheat his partner's heirs out of a chunk of the King Ranch nearly 120 years ago? He may have—and if the Texas Supreme Court permits Chapman v. King Ranch, Inc., to go to trial, the past could come back to haunt the state's most storied spread.

Last Page |
July 31, 1997

Judge Roy Bean

WEST OF THE PECOS THERE IS NO LAW; west of El Paso there is no God.” So went the saying in unsettled West Texas—until the day in 1882 when Roy Bean became a justice of the peace in dusty little Langtry, where the sign over the Jersey Lilly, his combination

Politics & Policy |
February 1, 1992

A New Foundation

If Texas is already overburdened with lawyers, and if, nevertheless, our law schools are still bursting with students, then I have a simple solution. Before submitting an application, all who want to apply to law school must sit down and read every word of the Texas constitution that was passed

Politics & Policy |
January 1, 1974

We the People…

When we write a constitution for the first time in almost 100 years, everyone wants a piece of the pie. In spite of it all, the new draft turned out to be an improvement. Now it's the legislature's turn.

Business |
November 1, 1973

Empires of Paper

A law firm of almost 200 attorneys becomes an institution with massive power and life of its own. Three such firms are in Texas, including two of the four largest in the U.S. We open them, for the first time, to the public.