Longreads

The Drug Runners

Jul 25, 2017 By Ryan Goldberg

The Tarahumara of northern Mexico became famous for their ability to run incredibly long distances. Now, they’re running for their lives.

Jo Carol Pierce
Bad Girls Get Old

Jun 26, 2017 By Jason Stanford

Thirty years ago, Jo Carol Pierce turned her Lubbock upbringing into a sublime musical about sex, suicide, and Jesus. Now 72, she's ready for her third act.

The Shelf Life of John Mackey

Jun 14, 2017 By Tom Foster

Whole Foods' eccentric founder changed the way Americans consume food. Can he survive the Wall Street forces that now want to consume him?

Welcome to the Green Machine

May 25, 2017 By John Nova Lomax

My son was jobless, directionless, and apartmentless. So when he decided to join the Army, we were just glad he was out of the house. What we didn’t know was just how much the military would change him—and us. 

David Brown
The Empathy of David Brown

May 21, 2017 By Michael J. Mooney

In the turbulent days after a gunman murdered five officers last year, the Dallas police chief was the voice of compassion and unity that the city and country needed. The way he sees it, his entire life had been preparing him for that moment.

3,822 Miles

Apr 19, 2017 By Rick Bass

One man's quest to fly the length of Texas's perimeter and capture the nature of our boundaries.

Star Rocket in Flight

Mar 22, 2017 By Chris O'Connell

With slick television ads promoting his signature Adidas, hip-hop songs dropping his name, a possible MVP award, and the most famous beard since ZZ Top, James Harden has arrived. In fact, he may just be the biggest name in Texas.

The Trouble With Innocence

Mar 22, 2017 By Michael Hall

For almost forty years, Kerry Max Cook did everything to clear his name after being convicted of a horrifying murder in Tyler. So when he was finally exonerated, why did he ask for his conviction back?

Cuban Revolution

Mar 20, 2017 By Skip Hollandsworth

He’s a billionaire. He says whatever is on his mind. He thinks he can run the country. No, it’s not Trump we’re talking about. Could Mark Cuban be our next president?

The Underdog’s on Top

Feb 23, 2017 By Andrew Roush

Country singer Aaron Watson wears denim, loves two-steppin', and sings about bluebonnets without irony. Which gets him little attention in Nashville—but plenty of love everywhere else.

The Faces of Obamacare

Feb 14, 2017 By Michael Hall

For many Americans, the controversial health law is government run amok. But for these people in San Antonio, it’s been a lifesaver.

The Power Behind the Throne

Jan 25, 2017 By R.G. Ratcliffe

In his second session as lieutenant governor, Dan Patrick has become the most influential person in Texas politics. Will his attempt to legislate who uses which bathroom slip him up?

Where Everybody Knows Your Name

Dec 30, 2016 By John Nova Lomax

In the age of gastropubs and microbreweries, Texas still boasts a few real dive bars—where the jukebox is irreplaceable, the beer is domestic, and the patrons feel like family—if you know where to look.

Where Everybody Knows Your Name

Dec 30, 2016 By John Nova Lomax

In the age of gastropubs and microbreweries, Texas still boasts a few real dive bars—where the jukebox is irreplaceable, the beer is domestic, and the patrons feel like family—if you know where to look.

The Prisoner

Dec 21, 2016 By Skip Hollandsworth

Edwin Debrow committed murder at age 12. Now 37, he remains behind bars. When should a child criminal be given a second chance?

Let the River Run

Dec 21, 2016 By Wes Ferguson

Wes Ferguson has paddled and walked all 87 miles of one of the Hill Country’s most prized waterways. In this exclusive excerpt from The Blanco River, he uncovers a few of its natural secrets.

For the Mouth Speaks

May 21, 2015 By Sonia Smith

Catherine Grove walked away from the Church of Wells last month. Now, she and the elders of the East Texas church explain why she left—and why she returned to the congregation that many call a cult.

Rocky Road

May 8, 2015 By Mimi Swartz

For the first time in its history, Blue Bell is in a right sticky mess.

Plains Sound

Feb 12, 2015 By Michael Hall

Twenty-year-old Hayden Pedigo is making the most innovative, audacious music in the country. So why is he still in Amarillo? 

To Love and to Cherish

Feb 6, 2015 By Pamela Colloff

In a 5-4 ruling on June 26, the U.S. Supreme Court declared that the Constitution guarantees the right for same-sex couples to marry across the country. Here is the story of two women who fought for that historic decision in Texas—and helped to make it a reality.

The Reformer

Jan 9, 2015 By Michael Hall

Texas’s criminal justice system has seen some staggering changes in the past decade. Thank Cathy Cochran. 

A Tree Is Known By Its Fruit

Dec 9, 2014 By Sonia Smith

When the 85-year-old matriarch of a prominent pecan-farming clan in San Saba was murdered, her death shook the town—and exposed how obsession and greed can fell a family from within.

The Road From Crystal City

Dec 9, 2014 By Jan Jarboe Russell

During World War II, Isamu Taniguchi was one of six-thousand-plus immigrants sent to a little-known internment camp in South Texas for being a suspected spy. In this excerpt from her new book, Jan Jarboe Russell uncovers how he and his family emerged unbroken.

Man on Fire

Nov 13, 2014 By Michael Hall

The Reverend Charles Moore ardently dedicated his life to the service of God and his fellow man. But when he couldn’t shake the thought that he hadn’t done enough, he drove to a desolate parking lot in his hometown of Grand Saline for one final act of faith.

A Tale of Two Robert Caro Profiles

Jan 21, 2013 By Jason Cohen

Both Esquire and the New York Times published lengthy profiles of LBJ biographer Robert Caro, who has just finished his fourth LBJ tome, The Passage to Power. But who had the better piece?

The Boys of the Dipper Ranch

Jan 21, 2013 By Sterry Butcher

On 50,000 acres that they have mostly to themselves (not including their hounds, mules, horses, cattle, chickens, piglets, and parents), Jasper, Trevor, and Tanner Klein live a life almost untouched by the modern world.

The Exile’s Lament

Jan 21, 2013 By Attica Locke

Even after I moved to Los Angeles, there was no question that I’d always be a Texan at heart. But what about my daughter?

The Children of Texas

Jan 21, 2013 By Stephen Harrigan

I was never certain how to explain the importance of the state to my three daughters. Now that I have two grandsons—named Mason and Travis, no less—I’ve realized something that I should have known all along. 

I Shall Never Surrender or Retreat . . .

Jan 21, 2013 By Skip Hollandsworth

. . . from teaching my fifteen-year-old daughter about her Texas roots. So when I realized I was failing to accomplish this most sacred of duties, I did what any well-meaning parent would do: loaded her (and her friends, of course) into the car and hit the road.

Truth or Consequences

Jan 21, 2013 By Joe Hagan

In 2004 Dan Rather tarnished his career forever with a much-criticized report on George W. Bush’s National Guard service. Eight years later, the story behind the story can finally be told: what CBS’s top-ranking newsman did, what the president of the United States didn’t do, and how some feuding Texas pols got the whole ball rolling.

Downward Dog

Jan 21, 2013 By Mimi Swartz

Over the past fifteen years, John Friend turned his Woodlands–based Anusara style of yoga into an internationally popular brand. Then, in the space of a few weeks, it became hopelessly twisted amid a wild series of accusations of sexual and financial improprieties.

Of Meat and Men

Jan 21, 2013 By Katy Vine

John Mueller was the heir to one of the great Texas barbecue dynasties. Aaron Franklin was an unknown kid from College Station who worked his counter. John had it all and then threw it all away. Aaron came out of nowhere to create the state’s most coveted brisket. Then John rose from the ashes.

Come and Take a Look at Me Now

Jan 21, 2013 By John Spong

Against all odds, Phil Collins has turned himself into a world-class Alamo buff who will happily talk your ear off about Santa Anna and Davy Crockett. Can you feel it coming in the Bexar tonight?

The Great Campaigner

Jan 21, 2013 By Jake Silverstein

After eleven contested elections dating back three decades, Rick Perry remains undefeated. Is he brilliant? Lucky? Ruthless? We asked the people who know best—his vanquished opponents.