Longreads

Whole Hog

Jan 21, 2013 By Philipp Meyer

Texas has a serious problem with feral hogs, which cause more than $400 million in damage every year. But it can be solved—one delicious bite at a time.

Tea for Texas

Jan 20, 2013 By Nate Blakeslee

It has more supporters here than anywhere else. It fueled the Republican landslide. It has its own caucus. But what is the tea party? And how will it use its power?

Between the Lines

Jan 20, 2013 By Texas Monthly

Ah, redistricting—that partisan, vengeful, hazardous battle for domination the Legislature fights every decade. Here we go again.

The Eighteen Billion Dollar Man

Jan 20, 2013 By Paul Burka

Texas is facing an unprecedented deficit in the next legislative session, so to help our poor, overworked elected officials, I went ahead and balanced the budget for them. And good Lord! It wasn’t pretty.

Born to Run

Jan 20, 2013 By Skip Hollandsworth

In the campaign for governor, the Republican nominee is out to prove to voters—and himself—that he’s his own George Bush.

Abel Gonzales
I Believe I Can Fry

Jan 20, 2013 By Katy Vine

How a mild-mannered database analyst from Dallas became the undisputed king of extreme competitive deep-frying in Texas—which is to say, the world.

The Man Who Isn’t There

Jan 20, 2013 By Paul Burka

In word and deed, the George W. Bush now residing in the White House bears little resemblance to the Texas governor I gladly sent to Washington. That's why I'm so ambivalent about reelecting him.

The Evolver

Jan 20, 2013 By Robert Draper

“All you’ve got is a famous name,” a Republican operative told George W. Bush. But six years later he was governor, and six years after that he was president. And six years after that, his place in history—not to mention the fate of the world—is a little uncertain.

Still Life

Jan 20, 2013 By Skip Hollandsworth

A violent tackle in a high school football game paralyzed John McClamrock for life. His mother made sure it was a life worth living.

Mothers, Sisters, Daughters, Wives

Jul 31, 2012 By Mimi Swartz

Read this National Magazine Award-winning story about how the Legislature slashed funding for women’s health programs in 2011 and launched an all-out war on Planned Parenthood that has dramatically changed the state’s priorities. The battle continues raging, and the stakes could not be higher.

Where Is My Home?

Mar 1, 2012 By Stephen Harrigan

A culinary obsession that began decades ago in my grandmother’s kitchen sent me on a quest through Central Texas (and way beyond) for kolaches—not the best ones but the ones that would lead me to myself.

Is There Life After Rick Perry?

Feb 1, 2012 By Paul Burka

When Rick Perry, the longest-serving governor in Texas history loses his first campaign ever, what happens to him? More importantly, what happens to us?

Abilene Strippers Suing Over Backpay

Dec 15, 2011 By Sonia Smith

Four strippers from Abilene are suing their employer in hopes of recouping overtime and unpaid wages they would have been entitled to if they were considered employees instead of contractors.

Cowgirl Up

Jul 31, 2011 By Barney Nelson

The word probably makes you think of rhinestone-studded jeans, floppy-brimmed hats, and Nashville queens, but “cowgirl” ought to stand for the tough pioneer women who built ranches and went on cattle drives and the hardy rural women who are out there today doing their fair share of the work, usually invisibly, to maintain a majestic way of live.

Do I Dare to Eat a Peach?

Jun 30, 2011 By John Spong

As a kid I was the pickiest eater you have ever seen, and family meals gave new meaning to the words “food fight.” But I gritted my teeth and overcame it—one disgusting tomato at a time.

The Secret History

Dec 1, 2002 By Don Graham

Did Richard King cheat his partner's heirs out of a chunk of the King Ranch nearly 120 years ago? He may have—and if the Texas Supreme Court permits Chapman v. King Ranch, Inc., to go to trial, the past could come back to haunt the state's most storied spread.

Meanwhile, Back at the Ranch

Nov 1, 2002 By Pamela Colloff

Once upon a time, the Central Texas town of Crawford was like Mayberry: Everyone knew everyone, no one talked politics, and the air was ripe with the aroma of hogs. Then the leader of the free world bought a little place west of the Middle Bosque River, and nothing was ever the same again.

The Day Treva Throneberry Disappeared

Mar 1, 2002 By Skip Hollandsworth

The North Texas teenager went missing in the late eighties. For years, no one knew where she was, or even if she was still alive-no one, that is, except a mysterious young woman two thousand miles away.

President Bush?

Jun 30, 1998 By Paul Burka

He’s the front-runner even before he has officially entered the race, but sky-high expectations are the least of the obstacles George W. Bush faces in his quest for the White House.

Still on the Case

Nov 1, 1983 By ronrosenbaum

Assassination buffs come in all shapes and convictions—archivists, technologists, mob-hit theorists, and more—but they are all obsessed with Lee Harvey Oswald, and his crime is the focus of their lives.

Never Love a Bandido

Apr 30, 1979 By Dick Reavis

Someone was gunning down members of the state’s toughest motorcycle gang one at a time. Doe hoped her man wouldn’t be next.