Newt Gingrich

Public Policy Polling: a Newt ball game

Nov 14, 2011 By Paul Burka

GOP Presidential race Gingrich 28 Cain 25 Romney 18 Perry 6 Bachman/Paul 5 Huntsman 3 * * * * Tweets by PPP about Perry: * 67% of voters nationally now view Rick Perry unfavorably- pretty amazing figure * Perry favorability is 34/48 with California GOP voters…getting towards being under water…

Poll update 11/6

Nov 6, 2011 By Paul Burka

These are the latest available polls in key states for the Republican primary: U.S. Republican Primary (Rasmussen) 11/2 Cain 26% Romney 23% Gingrich 15% Perry 8% Iowa  Caucus (Insider Advantage) 11/6 Cain 30% Romney 15% Gingrich 12% Paul 9% Bachmann 8% Perry 6% Santorum 2% Huntsman 2% Iowa Caucus (Des…

Romney holds big lead in N.H.

Jul 11, 2011 By Paul Burka

No surprise here. A WMUR/Granite State poll, conducted by the University of New Hampshire Survey Center, shows the former Massachusetts governor far in front, Bachmann running second, and everyone else in single digits. The date of the poll was not reported. The poll results (773 likely Republican primary voters, MOE…

PPP: Republican frontrunners lose ground; could Perry be the beneficiary?

Mar 28, 2011 By Paul Burka

From Tom Jensen on the Public Policy Polling Web site: Much has been written about the weakness of the 2012 Republican Presidential candidate field but what I think might be most remarkable about the leading quartet of Mike Huckabee, Sarah Palin, Mitt Romney, and Newt Gingrich  is that they've all become more unpopular and by quite a good bit since we started monthly national 2012 polling in April of 2009. The fact that the more Americans are exposed to them, the less they like them certainly does not bode well for their competitiveness next year. * In April 2009 Huckabee's favorability was +8 at 42/34. Now it's -7 at 35/42, for a 15 point drop over the last two years. His net drop has been 25 points with Democrats, 7 points with Republicans, and 19 points with independents. * In April 2009 Palin's favorability was -7 at 42/49. Now it's -22 at 35/57, for a 15 point drop over the last two years. Her net drop has been 19 points with Democrats, 18 points with Republicans, and 19 points with independents.

Thursday afternoon tea

Apr 20, 2010 By Paul Burka

I attended a tea party meeting on tax day. It was held at the Doubletree on Interstate 35 north. The session took place in the hotel ballroom, so the atmosphere was rather subdued. The attendees were almost entirely white and in the 40 to 60 age cohort. I did see one African-American couple. From my vantage point, at the back of the room, women appeared to outnumber men. The word that is always used to describe tea party members is "angry," but that was not the mood here. I didn't see any signs on display either. These were ordinary folks, salt-of-the-earth types. As I arrived, a man onstage was talking. He was wearing a suit and appeared to be some kind of official. "If you're a Republican in district 47, and you want to give Valinda Bolton an early retirement--and we don't endorse any candidates--you need to get involved at the local level, in your precinct. If you're a Republican or a Democrat, we're in this together, because if what we're doing doesn't work for all Americans, then we're doing the wrong thing." The official called on people in the audience. A woman from Kerr County said, "You said that the only way was to get involved at the local level. There's as much bad stuff going on at the local level as there is in Washington, D.C." The next question from the audience was, "How do we not splinter off into a third party?" The answer from the dais was, "There is no one leader of the tea party. We're savvy. We get it." "Our view is, when you have a primary, pick the one that embodies your principles. Then vote for someone who is fiscally conservative." About this time, Newt Gingrich arrived and was introduced to enthusiastic applause. "Thank you for that very warm welcome," Gingrich says. "Today [April 15] we pay for government. Three days from now is the anniversary of Paul Revere's ride. What has made America remarkable is the people's willingness to stand up for their rights. They really believed what is written in the Declaration of Independence. We are endowed by our Creator. These rights are inalienable. We are the only people in history to say power comes from God to you. You are personally sovereign." "The second part--you're endowed with the right to pursue happiness--in the eighteenth century, happiness meant wisdom. It doesn't say that we're all endowed with equal happiness, or that we have happiness stamps, or redistributed happiness." "You're sending a signal to the rest of America to get involved. There is zero reason to believe that elected politicians are an elite, an aristocracy. Only 535 serve in the House. [This was a mistake that a former speaker should not make. Only 435 serve in the House. Another 100 serve in the Senate.] The American dream was to decentralize government, to have citizens engaged." "I believe adamantly, we have to be the movement of Yes and the party of Yes." "Obama, Pelosi, and Reed are the secular socialist machine." "The morning after we win, we have to be prepared to do things. You have to say what you're going to do and then do them. Government should be a conversation among all of us." [Then Gingrich mentioned his record as speaker]

McCain’s strategy: lunacy or genius?

Sep 25, 2008 By Paul Burka

My first reaction to McCain’s decision to suspend his campaign and forego the debate due to the economic meltdown was that it was an awful move. My second reaction was the same. The country is facing a crisis and McCain, who just ran a TV spot saying, “I’ve tackled tougher…

Straight Arrow

Jan 1, 1995 By Paul Burka

The new Ways and Means chairman, Bill Archer, takes aim at the federal budget.