Texana

The Legend of John Holmes Jenkins

Feb 19, 2020 By Chris O'Connell

He was a notorious deal maker known for bringing priceless pieces of Texas history back to the state. He was also a suspected forger and arsonist. Thirty years ago, he was found dead in the Colorado River near Austin, and to this day a question remains: Could John Holmes Jenkins have masterminded his own death?

TEXAS HISTORY - Paredes and Dobie Illustration
Américo Paredes vs. J. Frank Dobie

Sep 18, 2019 By John Phillip Santos

For years, the great folklorist convinced many scholars and activists that the vaunted “Texas Man of Letters” was an anti-Mexican racist. Maybe it’s time to reconsider that judgment—as Paredes himself eventually did.

Singin’ on the Range

Jul 15, 2013 By Paul Knight

At the Fort Griffin Fandangle, Texas’s oldest outdoor musical, an all-amateur local cast reenacts its own bloody history.

What an Employer!

Jan 21, 2013 By Jason Cohen

Whataburger sticks it to the man, filing a lawsuit against debt collector NCO for repeatedly calling the company's corporate headquarters in search of one employee. 

Tools of the Trade

Jan 21, 2013 By Texas Monthly

Cooking like a Texan requires its own special gear, whether it’s a woodpile for the smoker, a skillet your granny used, or a well-worn wooden spoon (maybe even the one your momma spanked your hiney with as a kid). Tortilla PressOne simple push = one fresh corn tortilla! Lime…

How Not to Cook Like a Texan

Jan 21, 2013 By John Spong

I’m still shocked by the number of people who suggested I didn’t know what I was doing. The first such skeptic just happened to be the Texanist, my housemate that winter of 1995, who was then known to the greater world simply as Dave. When I informed him of my…

Mama Grande’s Rice

Jan 21, 2013 By Sylvia Csares

My grandmother, or Mama Grande, lived in Donna, between Brownsville and McAllen, and we’d often go see her on Sundays. We’d take Highway 281, a two-lane road that runs parallel to the Rio Grande and that Dad called el camino militar. I remember sitting in the backseat of his ’57…

Abel Gonzales
I Believe I Can Fry

Jan 20, 2013 By Katy Vine

How a mild-mannered database analyst from Dallas became the undisputed king of extreme competitive deep-frying in Texas—which is to say, the world.

Cowgirl Up!

Aug 31, 2012 By Jordan Breal

From horseback riding to grilling my own ribeye, three days in Bandera brought out my inner Dale Evans.

The Rattler, 1992-2012

Aug 5, 2012 By Jason Cohen

The Six Flags Fiesta Texas thrill ride, which at one time was the tallest, steepest, fastest wooden rollercoaster in the country, shut down operations Sunday. 

Foodways Texas Is Getting Fat and Sassy

Mar 26, 2012 By Patricia Sharpe

Foodways Texas, which was founded in July 2010 “to preserve, promote, and celebrate the diverse food cultures of Texas," held its second annual symposium in Austin this past weekend. A couple of hundred participants listened to talks on the theme of “Texas Preserved”—a deliberately wide-ranging topic that covered cocktails, the drought, cattle, sugar plantations, heritage pigs, beer, shrimp boats, oysters, “trash fish,” and even mayhaw jelly. Attendees also ate, very, very well, from a brisket dinner catered by Austin ‘cue maestro John Mueller (with sides by Hoover’s Cooking) to the recreation of a Texas farm dinner circa 1840 at Boggy Creek Farm. The main course at the latter feast consisted of succulent grilled Red Wattle pigs (a heritage breed) provided by Revival Market in Houston; the chef for the occasion was Sonya Cote of Austin’s East Side Showroom and the brand new Hillside Farmacy. Here are four choice moments from the nearly two-dozen presentations at the symposium: "Two generations ago Texas housewives could buy sugar grown, refined, and packaged in Texas. The brand was Imperial, and it was downright disloyal to buy anything else. But gradually the thriving Texas sugar cane industry collapsed. The cause of its slow death was a perfect storm of cane disease, bad weather, and cheap sugar from other countries, to name just three reasons. But today, sugar cane may be making a comeback in the Rio Grande Valley. Could Texas once again become a sugar belt—or sugar bowl?" - MM Pack, food writer and culinary historian, Austin, speaking on “A Short but Not Always Sweet History of Sugar in Texas.”

I Say Burrito, You Say Taco

Dec 1, 2011 By Patricia McConnico

Our top-notch team of anonymous reviewers have some strong words on what to call those delicious tortillas filled with things like eggs, beans, or chorizo. Regardless of semantics, though, they all like to eat them.

Anita Perry

Aug 31, 2005 By Evan Smith

“He’s probably stronger now than when we were younger, but I’ve changed that same way. And we’ve probably gotten more conservative as we’ve gotten older.”