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Meet the Official Cat of the Alamo, Miss Isabella Francisca Veramendi de Valero

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Nearly a year ago, we noted with grief the passing of Mistress Clara Carmack, also known as C.C., the official cat of the Alamo. C.C., of course, had taken over the role as the historic mission’s feline representative years after the passing of Ruby, who’d served as the Alamo’s cat from 1981-1986. The (scratching) post won’t remain vacant nearly as long this time, though, as C.C.’s replacement has officially been named: Meet Miss Isabella Francisca Veramendi de Valero, also known as Bella, the new Alamo cat. 

According to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Bella, a calico, was found at the Presidio la Bahia in Goliad, and was taken to the Alamo by an employee. 

Bella wears a tag that says, “I Belong At The Alamo.” She’s been seen on a cannon, playing near a computer keyboard and frolicking with workers.

Staffers care for and pay her expenses. Bella spends nights in an Alamo office.

Her official duties include welcoming visitors and hunting rodents, and enjoying the occasional saucer full of milk. 

The ongoing presence of an official Alamo cat is one of the quirkier and more delightful traditions surrounding the fabled mission. Both Ruby and C.C. are buried on the grounds (presumably to the consternation of noted Alamo memorabilia collector Phil Collins, who we imagine would have proudly stuffed, mounted, and displayed the beasts), and each of the animals receives permanent memorials on the website of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, where sentences like “C.C., as you can see from her photo, was a regal feline who was aware of her importance,” “during her short life not a stray cat, dog, nor ‘nother varmit dared set foot in the sacred battleground,” and “she liked reading about Ms. Clara Driscoll, who with Adina de Zavala, saved the Alamo from being demolished” appear with utmost sincerity. 

May Bella’s tenure at the Alamo be long and glorious, with ample time for rodent-hunting and luxiurating in the sun. 

(image via the Texas Land Office)

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