Patricia Hart – DUPE

Stories

Minority Report

As Democrats and Republicans prepare for the hand-to-hand combat of 2002, African American and Hispanic candidates are finally on the front lines.

Party Poopers II

Ronald Reagan once commanded, “Thou shalt not speak ill of a fellow Republican.” So why has the state GOP declared war on itself over resdistricting?

The Craddickal Right

Tom Craddick of Midland wants to be the first Republican Speaker of the House in Texas since 1873. He may already have the votes, but his critics are questioning his tactics.

Right Makes Might

After a conservative think tank used its clout to help scuttle a science textbook, some Republicans declared victory. The rest declared war.

Mr. Happy Man Goes to Washington

Ron Kirk may be this year’s most jovial political candidate, but his bid for the U.S. Senate is as much about race as personality. He knows it. His fellow Democrats know it. And you’d better believe the Republicans know it.

Race of Races

Who will succeed Brown as the mayor of Houston? He’ll probably be black or Hispanic, but he could be White.

Christmas Carole

When it’s time for her to give the gift of a revenue estimate, Comptroller Rylander could be naughty or nice. Either way, the Legislature better watch out.

Ex Marks the Spot

Being governor was great, but not being governor is even better.

The Enforcer

The name on everyone’s lips this legislative session is unknown to most people outside Austin—inside Austin too. But Mike Toomey, the governor’s chief of staff, is the most powerful political operative at the Capitol—and the most feared. Just ask his fellow Republicans.

The Unkindest Cut

Three months ago we named David Dewhurst one of the state’s best legislators. Now we’re not so sure.

Hood Riddance

How is school finance like a Russian novel? And other questions about the most pressing issue in Texas—and Rick Perry’s plan for dealing with it.

Speakergate

For the Republicans under investigation for campaign-finance violations, Sharpstown is the elephant in the room.

Signs of Trouble

The Democratic congressmen targeted by the GOP
redistricting plan think they can survive.

3.—25.

Twenty-three other people with more clout than they know what to do with. (Well, they know exactly what to do with it.)

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